threaded to threadless



AlexOkp

New Member
Jun 14, 2006
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Hey, first off, I'm new to the forum, so hello. I'm 20 and live in San Marcos Texas. I've got an older peugeot monaco with egg beater pedals, selle san marco bontrager carbon rail saddle,shimano cranks and and panaracer pasela tourguard tires. I know I'm weird for doing all this to an old peugeot, but the money hasn't equalled what I'd be paying for a newer bike so I don't feel like a complete moron yet.
I'm looking to swap my threaded forks for some carbon threadless forks. I've read around and I see mostly tips and conversions to changing the quill stem to a threadless stem. So I'm wondering, would it be best to just get a threadless stem and forks. Would it work that easy or am I over looking something? I have a feeling the headset falls into play somewhere here.
Thanks and I'm kind of a n00b at all this so, take it easy.
 
artmichalek said:
You are going to have to replace the headset as well.
so basically i just need to find a whole threadless set up that fits? nothing special right? like no 'conversions' or weird things like that?
so are the sizes and everything pretty common or am I going to have some trouble? anything else I should look out for? I'm pretty sure my forks are 700c or 27"
 
AlexOkp said:
so basically i just need to find a whole threadless set up that fits? nothing special right? like no 'conversions' or weird things like that?
so are the sizes and everything pretty common or am I going to have some trouble? anything else I should look out for? I'm pretty sure my forks are 700c or 27"
Any fork/headset/stem combo with a 1" steerer should fit the frame. If your wheels are in fact 27" instead of 700c it's going to limit your fork choices. There are some 700c forks out there designed for increased tire clearance that will hold a 27". You'll want to try to match the rake and axle to crown length of the old fork. I would strongly recomend talking to your LBS about what the specifics because you're probably going to need them to do the headset swap.
 
artmichalek said:
Any fork/headset/stem combo with a 1" steerer should fit the frame. If your wheels are in fact 27" instead of 700c it's going to limit your fork choices. There are some 700c forks out there designed for increased tire clearance that will hold a 27". You'll want to try to match the rake and axle to crown length of the old fork. I would strongly recomend talking to your LBS about what the specifics because you're probably going to need them to do the headset swap.
thanks man. my best friends a bike tech, so i'll just ask him. he thinks i'm a moron for even doing anything to this bike so i just wanted to get down to the specifics that i need to ask him.
 
AlexOkp said:
thanks man. my best friends a bike tech, so i'll just ask him. he thinks i'm a moron for even doing anything to this bike so i just wanted to get down to the specifics that i need to ask him.
A nice carbon fork can set you back $300+. A headset, probably $50 for a cheap one and then you'll need a threadless stem (another $50). The point your friend might be getting at, is you'll be dropping some good coin on an old bike, and you'll still have slow wheels, a heavy frame and a drivetrain that might be obsolete. I would ride it and save up for a new bike down the road. I know, this sounds like really boring advice from a 42 year old fat guy, but I can say that the upgrade thing just never really pays off, unless you're starting with a sweet frame. Wheels are always the best upgrade (IMHO) too. Keep riding, this bike will make you super strong.
 
You don't nessacarily have to get a wound up carbon fork and the most bad ass expensive stem...

Fork 89.00
Headset 24.99
Stem 28.00

The whole deal for under $150

I guess now you have to start asking yourself is this a really good peugot frame or just an el cheapo...look for a sticker that tells you what kind of metal its made out of... or let us know what the current type of components are. It could be a really cool or a dud...

Don't get one of those threadless adapters... the whole reason to go with threadless is to have a better headset... the adapter uses your current headset which is what you want to get rid of...
 
Try to give us more model name/date information. Check the decals on the frame. I did a short search on Peugot Monaco and found that name was used for multiple models over a range of years. It would be better to have loacl people help you since they can look at the frame and tell you wether it was a sweet one in its day or a POS. You can't polish a turd.
 
Alright well, it doesn't look too terribly old. It's in excellent condition. One dencal on the bottom tube of the frame says HLE which stands for Haute Limite Elastique. Then there's the bright peugeot logos which are orange, blue, white and yellow. The frame is a silverish white and then there's a tag that I'm assuming is the vin or serial number. That help at all?
 
Here's what I've figured out so far:
The tubing is high tensile steel. HLE was the replacement for the Carbolite 103 on used the entry level Peugeot models. It came out around 1985.I think mine's a little newer than an 85'.
 
jamesdemien said:
Don't get one of those threadless adapters... the whole reason to go with threadless is to have a better headset... the adapter uses your current headset which is what you want to get rid of...

Umm, there's nothing wrong with conventional headsets so long as they're quality, and well maintained. I've had a whole load more trouble with Aheadsets than I've ever had with conventional ones.
 
AlexOkp said:
Here's what I've figured out so far:
The tubing is high tensile steel. HLE was the replacement for the Carbolite 103 on used the entry level Peugeot models. It came out around 1985.I think mine's a little newer than an 85'.
Your friend is both right & wrong about your upgrading endeavor ...

Your frame is a bit porky ... probably weighs close to 6 lbs without ANYTHING attached to it; but, that doesn't mean it is a bad ride.

If you realize that almost EVERYTHING (except the seatpost) can probably be moved to a better frame in the future, than the upgrades you are making aren't necessarily a bad thing.

The attached picture is an OLDER Peugeot with a Reynolds 501 frame (circa 1985 ... rear dropouts respaced to 130mm) -- a slightly better frame than yours, but not by much -- which I refer to it as my "Winter" bike. The only original bits on the frame are the rear dropout's adjusting screws. The crankset is Dura Ace 7700, the front derailleur is Ultegra 6503, the rear derailleur is XTR 950 ... wheels have DA hubs & MAVIC rims ... etc. Mostly higher end stuff which could be readily moved to another frame at any time if I wanted to.

When I switched my Peugeot's Carbolite steel fork for the LOOK carbon fiber fork (the headset is a Campagnolo Record), the ride did not change -- carbon fiber & all other frame materials attempt to mimic the RIDE of a steel frame at a reduced weight ... a high tensile carbon steel frame like yours has THE ride which framemakers attempt to replicate (even, better steel frames try to mimic the ride of a high tensile carbon steel frame)!

Having said that, the ONLY thing that changing to a carbon fork will do is to reduce the overall weight of your bike by about a pound, or so ... unless you get the Alpha-Q sub-3 fork which will apparently give you a worse ride (according to someone who switched his Kestrel fork for the particular Alpha-Q fork because he is a weight weenie)!

So, unless your fork is damaged, changing forks will be mostly a cosmetic exericise ...

Changing to lighter tubes & tires will give you more bang for your buck ... at the risk of more flats.

Investing the money on better (?) wheels than you may have will give you a greater return than changing forks.

Possibly, even a a "better" bottom bracket may be a greater benefit.
 
One caution...

I seem to recall that both headsets and bottom brackets on some French bikes are exclusive to French bikes. Some French headsets are not 1", they are slightly different in size, so you might not be able to swap as easily as you would otherwise.

You can probably ask in forums with many Classic & Vintage members to see if they can confirm your headset size.

I believe I saw a Monaco Mixte bike once that was made in Canada. I don't know if they all were. I also don't know if Canadian made Peugeots had the odd ball size for the headset or not.
 
dgregory57 said:
One caution...

I seem to recall that both headsets and bottom brackets on some French bikes are exclusive to French bikes. Some French headsets are not 1", they are slightly different in size, so you might not be able to swap as easily as you would otherwise.

You can probably ask in forums with many Classic & Vintage members to see if they can confirm your headset size.

I believe I saw a Monaco Mixte bike once that was made in Canada. I don't know if they all were. I also don't know if Canadian made Peugeots had the odd ball size for the headset or not.
THAT is a VERY GOOD CAUTION when dealing with older French bikes ...

But, the Canadian Peugeots all use, AFAIK, English threads for the BB & headsets (if threaded).

MY Peugeot was probably the last one which used a French threaded headset ... the head tube is a normal 1" size ... and, the LOOK fork & Camapgnolo headset that I installed both have English theads.

Fortunately, the BB shell on my Peugeot had English threads ...
 
alfeng said:
THAT is a VERY GOOD CAUTION when dealing with older French bikes ...

But, the Canadian Peugeots all use, AFAIK, English threads for the BB & headsets (if threaded).

MY Peugeot was probably the last one which used a French threaded headset ... the head tube is a normal 1" size ... and, the LOOK fork & Camapgnolo headset that I installed both have English theads.

Fortunately, the BB shell on my Peugeot had English threads ...
Yeah mine's a canadian peugeot. Thanks for all the info guys and I'll admit probably 70% of the reason I'd like a carbon fork is for aesthetics. Alfeng your bike looks awesome. I was wondering, what are some modern frames that i could swap these parts to if I ever wanted to? I actually went and bought some lighter tires and new tubes 2 days ago, I noticed a HUGE difference. I had no problem climbing hills that used to otherwise give me some trouble, but maybe that's just me. Once again, thanks for the help guys I'm taking everything into consideration. If I sell a project motorcycle I have for the amount of money I'd like I might just get a 02' Trek 1000, but otherwise I'll just continue to crank on the old Peugeot. I don't mind either way.
 
AlexOkp said:
Yeah mine's a canadian peugeot. Thanks for all the info guys and I'll admit probably 70% of the reason I'd like a carbon fork is for aesthetics. Alfeng your bike looks awesome. I was wondering, what are some modern frames that i could swap these parts to if I ever wanted to? I actually went and bought some lighter tires and new tubes 2 days ago, I noticed a HUGE difference. I had no problem climbing hills that used to otherwise give me some trouble, but maybe that's just me. Once again, thanks for the help guys I'm taking everything into consideration. If I sell a project motorcycle I have for the amount of money I'd like I might just get a 02' Trek 1000, but otherwise I'll just continue to crank on the old Peugeot. I don't mind either way.
This is just my opinion ... others may disagree/agree ... but, I think you won't be particularly happy with the Trek 1000.

The Trek 1000 is undoubtedly a nice-enough bike ... but, AFAIK, it has an aluminum frame which is not as nicely "tuned" as the zoot-suit aluminum frames from Klein or Cannondale.

Still, IMO, the BEST buy for under $1000 is the Mercier which Sprtymama is selling on eBay (many sizes are available) ... ~$700 + $40 shipping ... mostly Tiagra (?) with a 105 rear derailleur. It's a bike with a steel frame ... probably fabricated in Taiwan ... but, that's okay ...

The listing has ended, but you can certainly contact the seller about the bike:


The Reynolds Ouzo Comp carbon fiber fork is a really nice fork ... it is the "economy" version which has an aluminum shoulder instead of being a full carbon fork ...

BTW. If you choose to buy a replacement fork for your Peugeot, it will have a 1" steerer (as has been previously mentioned). Most non-steel frames use forks with 1 1/8" steerers. To use a 1" threadless (or, threaded) fork in a frame with a larger head tube, you need a PROBLEM SOLVER headtube reducer (essentially, a shim) which costs about $30 ... and, your local bike shop will more-than-likely be completely clueless.

There are a lot of nice, used steel frames which you can get on eBay.

If you've got money to spare, there are MANY new, steel Italian frames which are available, but the prices start at about $800, retail, and go up to about $2000 (there may be MORE expensive steel frames out there) ... that's custom frame price range. I think Bob Jackson (Leeds, England) still sells steel bike frames. Waterford is an American frame builder who still sells steel frames (big bucks, like most steel frames) -- a Waterford frame will impress all but the most uninitiated.
 
alfeng said:
THAT is a VERY GOOD CAUTION when dealing with older French bikes ...

But, the Canadian Peugeots all use, AFAIK, English threads for the BB & headsets (if threaded).

MY Peugeot was probably the last one which used a French threaded headset ... the head tube is a normal 1" size ... and, the LOOK fork & Camapgnolo headset that I installed both have English theads.

Fortunately, the BB shell on my Peugeot had English threads ...

I know for sure that at least some Peugeots used French threads at least up to 1988 - I just sold a 1988 PY10P frame (FRench built), which had French threads.
 
Eastway82 said:
I know for sure that at least some Peugeots used French threads at least up to 1988 - I just sold a 1988 PY10P frame (FRench built), which had French threads.
Ah, I guess Peugeot started switching over to English threaded BB shells with the lesser bikes, first!
 
alfeng said:
Ah, I guess Peugeot started switching over to English threaded BB shells with the lesser bikes, first!

Could be! Maybe they were just using up the high end French stuff they had in stock!

Also meant to point out earlier that if you get a 1in threadless fork, it's simple enough to get it threaded so you can use your existing threaded headset/stem combo. I did this recently, fitting a pair of threadless Rock Shox to my wife's old Scott mtb. Worked a treat.