Threadless stem recommendations

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Scott McDonald, Jan 29, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands to stay
    away from, fitting tips, compatibility with bars, etc.

    Thanks in advance,

    Scott
     
    Tags:


  2. "Scott McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands to
    > stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with
    bars,
    > etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Scott

    I have bicycles with a TTT Forgie and a Ritchey Comp. I like the look of the Forgie but both
    function well. Both are moderately priced as well.

    Brian Lafferty
     
  3. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Scott McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands to
    > stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with
    bars,
    > etc.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Scott
    >

    Go to a good LBS. They should be willing to let you exchange an inexpensive brand that they stock in
    lots of sizes until you find the one that gives you the perfect fit. When you get the length and
    angle right you can go for the pricey pretty one if you wish. Just don't cut the steerer tube to
    short to soon.

    I did the above with the local shop and Salsa MotoAce stems. Inexpensive, stiff, reasonable weight,
    lots of sizes available. Kind of industrial looking but worked so well I've never felt compelled to
    change it out for the pretty one. Also a good choice for a carbon steerer. Bill
     
  4. scott-<< On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands
    to stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with bars,

    hard to beat Ritchey. great design, various models and levels, good shape handlebars...

    had some problems with DEDA...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    "Scott McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands to
    > stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with bars, etc.

    Don't do it. You'll look like a johnny-come-lately bike equipment fashion victim.

    Dick (if it was good enough for Eddy, it's good enough for you) Durbin
     
  6. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Having bikes with both threaded and threadless stems on them, the biggest thing advantage for
    threadless I can see are the removable face plates for the bars. Makes changing things a lot easier.

    I have always liked my Eclypse steel stems, but the new Ritchey Pro stems I'm riding now are so much
    easier to deal with.

    As far as what threadless stem you want, it comes down to: what rise/length stem puts you in the
    proper position? I like Ritcheys, have had a Forgie, a Forge Ahead, and some generic stems. As long
    as they're the right size, all you're buying are name and weight. They all seem about as equally
    stiff, clamp onto the bars about the same, and basically do the same job.

    "Dick Durbin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Scott McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on brands to
    > > stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with
    bars,
    > > etc.
    >
    > Don't do it. You'll look like a johnny-come-lately bike equipment fashion
    victim.
    >
    > Dick (if it was good enough for Eddy, it's good enough for you) Durbin
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >Having bikes with both threaded and threadless stems on them, the biggest thing advantage for
    >threadless I can see are the removable face plates for the bars. Makes changing things a lot
    >easier. I have always liked my Eclypse steel stems, but the new Ritchey Pro stems I'm riding now
    >are so much easier to deal with.

    You can get removeable faceplate quill stems. So that shouldn't be the reason you go threadless.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  8. Dick Durbin <[email protected]> schreef in berichtnieuws
    [email protected] <snip>
    > Dick (if it was good enough for Eddy, it's good enough for you) Durbin

    You mean the same Eddy that argued: 'nobody uses a bamboo stick for a pole vault anymore, so why
    should anyone ride the same bike as I did?'

    He seems to consider threadless stems good enough for all bicycles he produces.
     
  9. [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > scott-<< On the market for my first threadless stem (road). Would appreciate your feedback on
    > brands to stay away from, fitting tips, compatibility with bars,
    >
    > hard to beat Ritchey. great design, various models and levels, good shape handlebars...
    >
    > had some problems with DEDA...
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    I had some serious problems with Deda stems last season, the Newton in particular. I had heard
    that they were fickle with tightening and things like that (Ti hardware strips easily), so I took
    out my trusty torque wrench to tighten the bolts. Seems as though that wasn't enough to prevent
    the clamp ear on the back of the stem from snapping off when I was doing some maintenance. That
    would have been pretty catastrophic during a ride or race I think. I moved over to Thomson stems,
    sturdy, stiff, and dependable. They aren't the most lightweight stems on the market, but I,
    personally, have never had a problem with anything Thomson has made over the years. I have a
    couple of their stems now, and won't ride anything but their posts on my bikes. Just personal
    preference. Take what you may.

    Tom
     
  10. [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > hard to beat Ritchey. great design, various models and levels, good shape handlebars...

    I'm interested in your take on the bars. I had to go with their classic shape because their WCS bend
    was too radical for me. Do they make something in-between - similar to ITM Millinium or something? I
    just like simple flats, not drops that come back 3 inches past the center of the bar.

    That being said - Ritchey road stuff is my favorite of all the parts I've used. With the movement
    towards "black" on a bike (carbon everywhere), I like their seatpost, bars, stem, wheels. Keep the
    good stuff coming Tom.

    a
     
  11. Dick Durbin

    Dick Durbin Guest

    "Jonathan v.d. Sluis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Dick Durbin <[email protected]> schreef in berichtnieuws
    > [email protected] <snip>
    > > Dick (if it was good enough for Eddy, it's good enough for you) Durbin
    >
    > You mean the same Eddy that argued: 'nobody uses a bamboo stick for a pole vault anymore, so why
    > should anyone ride the same bike as I did?'
    >
    > He seems to consider threadless stems good enough for all bicycles he produces.

    If he is going to sell any bikes at his price level, he'd better have threadless stems on them.
    That's all the dedicated followers of fashion will accept these days. I am not aware of there
    being any great hue and cry from riders complaining about quill stems and wanting something
    different. I suppose they work just fine and make it easier to remove the bar, but they are
    butt-ugly and clunky looking.

    Dick Durbin just and old, set-in-his-ways fart
     
  12. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    I don't know if they're making them this year, but I've been buying all of the "Pro" bars I've found
    at Supergo. Nice shape, not as extreme as the BioMax Pro, and fairly light. Its got that nifty
    little bump where your palm goes.

    Mike "Andrew Martin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > hard to beat Ritchey. great design, various models and levels, good
    shape
    > > handlebars...
    >
    > I'm interested in your take on the bars. I had to go with their classic shape because their WCS
    > bend was too radical for me. Do they make something in-between - similar to ITM Millinium or
    > something? I just like simple flats, not drops that come back 3 inches past the center of the bar.
    >
    > That being said - Ritchey road stuff is my favorite of all the parts I've used. With the movement
    > towards "black" on a bike (carbon everywhere), I like their seatpost, bars, stem, wheels. Keep the
    > good stuff coming Tom.
    >
    > a
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...