Threadless to Threaded?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gary Mishler, May 2, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gary Mishler

    Gary Mishler Guest

    Can a fork with a 1" steel or alloy threadless steerer be converted to a threaded steerer? If so,
    how big of a deal is it and what should you expect to pay to have it done?

    Thanks, Mish
     
    Tags:


  2. > Can a fork with a 1" steel or alloy threadless steerer be converted to a threaded steerer? If so,
    > how big of a deal is it and what should you
    expect
    > to pay to have it done?
    >
    > Thanks, Mish

    Mish: Very few shops have appropriate tooling for installing virgin threads on a fork that
    originally had none. Most of the dies that shops use are fine for cleaning threads up, or adding new
    ones providing the guide threads are original (in other words, once a die is cutting entirely new
    territory, having left behind the original threads that it could use as a guide, thread quality
    declines dramatically). The best way to cut threads is on a lathe, but not too many people are set
    up for that.

    Of course, aluminum threads might cut like butter, but I'm not aware of anybody using threaded 1"
    aluminum steer tubes, as I don't think they'd be very strong (the threads would be very easily
    damaged with use).

    There are many benefits to using a threadless system; is there some particular requirement for your
    project that requires a threaded fork?

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Replace the fork?

    "Gary Mishler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Can a fork with a 1" steel or alloy threadless steerer be converted to a threaded steerer? If so,
    > how big of a deal is it and what should you
    expect
    > to pay to have it done?
    >
    > Thanks, Mish
     
  4. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Easy, replace the fork

    "Gary Mishler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Can a fork with a 1" steel or alloy threadless steerer be converted to a threaded steerer? If so,
    > how big of a deal is it and what should you
    expect
    > to pay to have it done?
    >
    > Thanks, Mish
     
  5. gmisher-<< Can a fork with a 1" steel or alloy threadless steerer be converted to a threaded
    steerer? If so, how big of a deal is it and what should you expect to pay to have it done?

    If steel, the steerer can be threaded...but must be done in such a way to ensure the threads are
    parallel to the fork crown seat, like on a lathe. We charge about $50...

    Not for aluminum, can be threaded but material too soft for this.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Gary Mishler

    Gary Mishler Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > There are many benefits to using a threadless system; is there some particular requirement for
    > your project that requires a threaded fork?

    Mike,

    Not *required*, no. What I was thinking of doing was replacing a cro-moly fork on my hybrid with a
    Winwood (or similar) carbon fork with metal steerer, but preserve the threaded headset and use a
    suspension stem. I have a machine shop nearby that has done some odd things for me before that could
    probably thread the steerer for me. BUT if strength of threaded alloy steerer is going to be a
    problem, then that's not going to work anyway. I can go threadless and give up the suspension stem
    if needed. Or, I can just keep the fork I have for that matter.

    FYI - My project is this: I have an approx 7 yr old Trek 750 that I'm trying to build up into a more
    suitable bike for unpaved roads/cinder trails in Europe and eventually Alaska rides. I'm thinking of
    upgrading to XT 9 speed drivetrain, good 36 spoke touring rims/hubs, and some type of mild front
    suspension (hence the threaded fork/suspension stem described above).

    Originally I was looking for a simple 700c suspension fork that would accept canti brakes, but that
    became enough of a hassle that I thought of going the route described above. I know everyone is
    using V brakes now, but the bike came with canti's, has non linear levers, has no cable stop for V
    brakes on top tube, and linear brakes interferer with my rear rack.

    Thanks - as always - for your input.

    Mish
     
  7. On Sat, 03 May 2003 12:24:42 GMT, "Gary Mishler" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> There are many benefits to using a threadless system; is there some particular requirement for
    >> your project that requires a threaded fork?
    >
    >Mike,
    >
    >Not *required*, no. What I was thinking of doing was replacing a cro-moly fork on my hybrid with a
    >Winwood (or similar) carbon fork with metal steerer, but preserve the threaded headset and use a
    >suspension stem. I have a machine shop nearby that has done some odd things for me before that
    >could probably thread the steerer for me. BUT if strength of threaded alloy steerer is going to be
    >a problem, then that's not going to work anyway. I can go threadless and give up the suspension
    >stem if needed. Or, I can just keep the fork I have for that matter.
    >
    >FYI - My project is this: I have an approx 7 yr old Trek 750 that I'm trying to build up into a
    >more suitable bike for unpaved roads/cinder trails in Europe and eventually Alaska rides. I'm
    >thinking of upgrading to XT 9 speed drivetrain, good 36 spoke touring rims/hubs, and some type of
    >mild front suspension (hence the threaded fork/suspension stem described above).
    >
    >Originally I was looking for a simple 700c suspension fork that would accept canti brakes, but that
    >became enough of a hassle that I thought of going the route described above. I know everyone is
    >using V brakes now, but the bike came with canti's, has non linear levers, has no cable stop for V
    >brakes on top tube, and linear brakes interferer with my rear rack.
    >
    >Thanks - as always - for your input.
    >
    >Mish
    >
    >
    >
    No need to give up the suspension stem. i" threadless Softride stems are still easly available in
    both steel and aluminum, in several lengths.

    Bob
     
  8. John Dacey

    John Dacey Guest

    On Sat, 03 May 2003 12:24:42 GMT, "Gary Mishler" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What I was thinking of doing was replacing a cro-moly fork on my hybrid with a Winwood (or similar)
    >carbon fork with metal steerer, but preserve the threaded headset and use a suspension stem. I have
    >a machine shop nearby that has done some odd things for me before that could probably thread the
    >steerer for me.

    Do not assume that the inside diameter of all threadless steerers will be appropriate for use with a
    quill stem. Freed from the constraints of having threads cut in it, a manufacturer might specify a
    steerer tube that will have walls thinner (or thicker, which would almost certainly the case with
    aluminum) than one that will provide a proper match for a Ø 22.2 stem quill.

    -------------------------------
    http://www.businesscycles.com John Dacey Business Cycles, Miami, Florida 305-273-4440 Now in our
    twentieth year. Our catalog of track equipment: seventh year online
    -------------------------------
     
  9. On Sat, 03 May 2003 12:42:29 GMT, Robert Quindazzi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 03 May 2003 12:24:42 GMT, "Gary Mishler" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>> There are many benefits to using a threadless system; is there some particular requirement for
    >>> your project that requires a threaded fork?
    >>
    >>Mike,
    >>
    >>Not *required*, no. What I was thinking of doing was replacing a cro-moly fork on my hybrid with a
    >>Winwood (or similar) carbon fork with metal steerer, but preserve the threaded headset and use a
    >>suspension stem. I have a machine shop nearby that has done some odd things for me before that
    >>could probably thread the steerer for me. BUT if strength of threaded alloy steerer is going to be
    >>a problem, then that's not going to work anyway. I can go threadless and give up the suspension
    >>stem if needed. Or, I can just keep the fork I have for that matter.
    >>
    >>FYI - My project is this: I have an approx 7 yr old Trek 750 that I'm trying to build up into a
    >>more suitable bike for unpaved roads/cinder trails in Europe and eventually Alaska rides. I'm
    >>thinking of upgrading to XT 9 speed drivetrain, good 36 spoke touring rims/hubs, and some type of
    >>mild front suspension (hence the threaded fork/suspension stem described above).
    >>
    >>Originally I was looking for a simple 700c suspension fork that would accept canti brakes, but
    >>that became enough of a hassle that I thought of going the route described above. I know everyone
    >>is using V brakes now, but the bike came with canti's, has non linear levers, has no cable stop
    >>for V brakes on top tube, and linear brakes interferer with my rear rack.
    >>
    >>Thanks - as always - for your input.
    >>
    >>Mish
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >No need to give up the suspension stem. i" threadless Softride stems are still easly available in
    >both steel and aluminum, in several lengths.
    >
    >Bob
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3606624027&category=22694
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...