Threadless vs. Threaded headsets

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Jun 25, 2003.

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  1. I currently ride on old Univega bike with the threaded head set that came with it. I am looking at a
    new Trek bike with a "threadless" design. I am not a racer, more Touring / Endurance rider (I ride
    about 100 miles a week and do a century every year). My fear is that the threadless desin will be
    too low / short for me? is this right?

    Cheers,

    Tom
     
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  2. Jkpoulos7

    Jkpoulos7 Guest

    >My fear is that the threadless desin will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    >

    Yes if the fork steerer tube gets cut too short youre screwed. If it's left longer you can use
    spacers above or below the stem to vary the height. Some shops leave the tube long for this purpose
    then will cut the tube when you find the optimal height for a neater appearance. Avoid ANY bike with
    a precut steerer tube since you will go crazy attempting to get the right h-bar height. The low bar
    looks racier but most people cannot find any comfort like that.
     
  3. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    Or try a adjustable stem for threadless .They give you a lot of adjustments.

    --
    J/O Trailblazer At large !!
     
  4. "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I currently ride on old Univega bike with the threaded head set that came with it. I am looking at
    > a new Trek bike with a "threadless" design. I am not a racer, more Touring / Endurance rider (I
    > ride about 100 miles a week and do a century every year). My fear is that the threadless desin
    > will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    >

    Not necessarily, but do make sure that the bike with the threadless fork has enough steerer tube
    showing to allow for a fair bit of adjustment whilst you find the position you're happy with (simply
    juggle the position of stem and spacers to suit).

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  5. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Typically some combination of a slightly rising stem (0 to +10 degrees as opposed to -17) and 5+
    cm of spacers on the steerer tube will but the bars at a decent height. I like 'em level with
    the saddle.

    Another thing to consider is frame design. If you go with a frame with a sloping top tube, you can
    often get a size that is on the larger side. The sloping gives you standover clearance while
    bringing the front end up. Just make sure the top tube won't be too long.

    Kyle

    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > I currently ride on old Univega bike with the threaded head set that came with it. I am looking at
    > a new Trek bike with a "threadless" design. I am not a racer, more Touring / Endurance rider (I
    > ride about 100 miles a week and do a century every year). My fear is that the threadless desin
    > will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Tom
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jkpoulos7" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >My fear is that the threadless desin will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    > >
    >
    > Yes if the fork steerer tube gets cut too short youre screwed. If it's left longer you can use
    > spacers above or below the stem to vary the height. Some shops leave the tube long for this
    > purpose then will cut the tube when you
    find
    > the optimal height for a neater appearance. Avoid ANY bike with a precut steerer tube since you
    > will go crazy attempting to get the right h-bar
    height.
    > The low bar looks racier but most people cannot find any comfort like that.

    This is all true, except that you can get stems with more rise, and most of those can be flipped to
    adjust the bar height either above or below that of a straight (90 degree) stem. You can also use
    steering tube extenders to add a couple of inches to a steerer that's otherwise cut too short, a bit
    of a kludge, but they work well in practice and are much less clunky looking than the typical
    adjustable angle stems sold with hybrid/comfort bikes.
     
  7. [email protected] (Jkpoulos7) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >My fear is that the threadless desin will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    > >
    >
    > Yes if the fork steerer tube gets cut too short youre screwed.

    <cut>

    Not necessarily, it is possible to fit a quill stem in a threadless steerer tube/A-headset, might
    not be very elegant, but it works.

    Andrew Webster
     
  8. > Not necessarily, it is possible to fit a quill stem in a threadless steerer tube/A-headset, might
    > not be very elegant, but it works.

    How do you compress the headset at that point? Do you just ride with it loose, i.e. falling apart?
    Or do you mean threading the steerer?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  9. On Wed, 25 Jun 2003 22:13:21 GMT, "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How do you compress the headset at that point? Do you just ride with it loose, i.e. falling apart?
    >Or do you mean threading the steerer?

    Well, make sure the star nut is down near the bottom of the steerer (using an extra long bolt, if
    necessary), clamp on a collar rather than a stem, remove cap, would be my train of thought. Dunno if
    that'd actually work.

    Jasper
     
  10. Andrew Webster wrote:

    >... it is possible to fit a quill stem in a threadless steerer tube/A-headset, might not be very
    >elegant, but it works.

    It is _sometimes_ possible to do this. We do this routinely installing SR suspension forks on
    Raleigh Twentys. These have steel steerers with
    1/16" wall thickness, so they work great after being threaded.

    However I've run into other steel steerers that had the wrong size bore, making it impossible to use
    a conventional 7/8" (22.2 mm) stem.

    Also, this should NEVER be done on a fork with an aluminum or plastic steerer, those are not strong
    enough to take the outward pressure of the wedge/expander without distorting or cracking.

    Sheldon "All Generalizations Are False" Brown
    +----------------------------------------------------------+
    | And what are all these mysteries to me, | Whose life is full of indices and surds? | x^2 +
    | 7x + 53 |
    | = 11/3 --Lewis Carroll |
    +----------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  11. OK, here is a sort of on topic question to add to this; is there a lockring type device that can be
    used for clamping the threadless headsets? That way you could still use a regular quill type stem.

    That would certainly simplify the height adjustment problem...

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Although much has been written ( esoecially here!) about the subject in theory, you really just need
    to ensure _your_ bicycle fits properly and the theory can wait.

    Consult your dealer and ask specifically about handlebar height. If your present bike fits well and
    the new one can duplicate that position, then you're fine!

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971 "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > I currently ride on old Univega bike with the threaded head set that came with it. I am looking at
    > a new Trek bike with a "threadless" design. I am not a racer, more Touring / Endurance rider (I
    > ride about 100 miles a week and do a century every year). My fear is that the threadless desin
    > will be too low / short for me? is this right?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Tom
     
  13. Trying

    Trying Guest

    Thanks, I did finally buy a bike (Trek 1000 2002 model, sweet deal!) and the Ahead was uncut and the
    position was fine. I think because the bike was sized properly I had no problem.

    Thanks for the help. (and for the help that was over my head! <gg>)

    Cheers,

    Tom

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Although much has been written ( esoecially here!) about the subject in theory, you really just
    > need to ensure _your_ bicycle fits properly and
    the
    > theory can wait.
    >
    > Consult your dealer and ask specifically about handlebar height. If your present bike fits well
    > and the new one can duplicate that position, then you're fine!
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971 "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > > I currently ride on old Univega bike with the threaded head set that
    came
    > > with it. I am looking at a new Trek bike with a "threadless" design. I
    am
    > > not a racer, more Touring / Endurance rider (I ride about 100 miles a
    week
    > > and do a century every year). My fear is that the threadless desin will
    be
    > > too low / short for me? is this right?
    > >
    > > Cheers,
    > >
    > > Tom
    > >
    >
     
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