three's company? or 8 is enough?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by recycled, May 14, 2008.

  1. recycled

    recycled Guest

    I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.

    Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one person
    really needs three bikes?

    My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension X-country
    MB just 6 years old.

    I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.

    So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?
     
    Tags:


  2. Cathy Kearns

    Cathy Kearns Guest

    "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?


    My husband, an avid cyclist, recently passed away. My mom and dad,
    attempting to help me dig out from all this stuff, look into the garage and
    say, two people (my daughter and I) seven bikes, perhaps we could get this
    back down to two. Well, not quite. It seems three and a half of those
    bikes are mine. (My "despite my weight I can be fast" carbon fiber road
    bike, my "going shopping and lunching in my skirt and heels" town bike, and
    my "the road is too slick for skinny tires but I need a workout anyway"
    hybrid bike.) I suppose, since my captain is gone, I don't really need the
    road tandem anymore. I suppose we could get it down to four. Though my
    daughter is now jonesing for a new bike. Sometimes she thinks she needs
    another "ride to school" bike, though in three weeks she's graduating to a
    school she will likely walk to. And sometimes she thinks she needs some
    lycra and a road bike.
     
  3. On May 14, 4:35 pm, "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >
    > Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one person
    > really needs three bikes?
    >
    > My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    > relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension X-country
    > MB just 6 years old.
    >
    > I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    > would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.
    >
    > So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?



    Save yourself a step or two and get an actual road bike.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >
    > Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one person
    > really needs three bikes?
    >
    > My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    > relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension X-country
    > MB just 6 years old.
    >
    > I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    > would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.
    >
    > So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?


    I like my disease.

    -Race Bike
    -Commuter road bike with fenders and rack
    -Cyclocross Bike
    -MTB
    -ridiculous TT/city/Alfine gearhub Pinarello thing
    -small-wheel tandem
    -crap folding bike with two-speed kickback hub
    -BMX in bits and pieces
    -pristine early-80s MTB a friend found in the trash

    Plus miscellaneous frames, parts, projects, crap, and such.

    I'd seriously like to add a full-suspension trailbike to the mix,

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "In other newsgroups, they killfile trolls."
    "In rec.bicycles.racing, we coach them."
     
  5. "Cathy Kearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    |
    | "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | news:[email protected]
    | > So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?
    |
    | My husband, an avid cyclist, recently passed away. My mom and dad,
    | attempting to help me dig out from all this stuff, look into the garage
    and
    | say, two people (my daughter and I) seven bikes, perhaps we could get this
    | back down to two. Well, not quite. It seems three and a half of those
    | bikes are mine. (My "despite my weight I can be fast" carbon fiber road
    | bike, my "going shopping and lunching in my skirt and heels" town bike,
    and
    | my "the road is too slick for skinny tires but I need a workout anyway"
    | hybrid bike.) I suppose, since my captain is gone, I don't really need
    the
    | road tandem anymore. I suppose we could get it down to four. Though my
    | daughter is now jonesing for a new bike. Sometimes she thinks she needs
    | another "ride to school" bike, though in three weeks she's graduating to a
    | school she will likely walk to. And sometimes she thinks she needs some
    | lycra and a road bike.

    Bikes are rapidly multiplying in my household, as my kids get into riding
    more and more. My son actually makes good use of whatever he has (he borrows
    my mountain bike, but has his own road bike and track bike), while my
    daughter just needs to have the bikes, ridden or not. It's only when my wife
    actually rides and has her bike in the house as well that it hits the fan
    and she talks about wanting to have a house where you're not constantly
    tripping over bikes.

    My own needs are relatively modest. I've got my extremely-nice road bike
    (Madone 5.9 SSL), my very nice "rain" road bike (5900), and my ancient (by
    mtb standards) Klein Mantra mountain bike. I do own a track bike, but it
    hasn't been ridden in many years.

    I don't recall how old your daughters are, but they've got an excellent
    program for young kids at the velodrome. Every 2nd & 4th Sunday, with an
    early session for kids 9-13 or so, and a later session for kids 13-17. No
    prior experience required, and it's done in a way that the kids have a lot
    of fun regardless of their ability.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "recycled" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >
    > Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles.


    Maybe /your/ fancy does ;-)

    > But what one person
    > really needs three bikes?


    .... hmmm, lessee:

    1) all-weather utility bike
    2) ugly weather fun bike
    3) fair weather fun bike

    Sounds reasonable to me.

    But if you ride both off-road and on-road, there's
    an excuse for a fourth bike.

    And then there're tandems.

    And having a spare bike kickin' around for
    friends & visitors. Although I guess a tandem
    would do in a pinch.

    And orphaned bikes who just need a loving home.

    > My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    > relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension X-country
    > MB just 6 years old.
    >
    > I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    > would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.


    I think Robert's right about just springing for a
    full-on road bike.

    > So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program


    Perish the thought!

    > or do I go for it?


    Knock yerself out. Maybe get rid of some stuff
    to make room for more bikes. Sofas take up more
    room than they're worth, they're hard for a longer
    legged person to stand-up from, and your cat(s) will
    either claw it to bits or pee on it (or both.) At
    least two bikes can fit in the space taken up by
    one sofa.

    Tables take up a lot of space too. Provide everybody
    with folding TV dinner tables. Card tables fold up
    readily, and can just be leaned against a wall. Don't
    have a BarcaLounger or La-Z-boy hogging a bunch of space.
    You don't need it anyways; you /ride/, you don't
    sit around.

    Bunk beds -- kick the lower bunk out so you can park
    some bikes there, and sleep on the upper bunk.
    Make use of vertical space.

    Closets are often great for hanging bikes up in.

    How many hours per day does your bathtub just
    sit there unused, keeping that space being from
    being used for storage?

    I furthermore suggest becoming fascinated with bike
    trailers, and then longtails.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    Nothing is safe from me.
    I'm really at:
    tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
     
  7. recycled

    recycled Guest

    "Cathy Kearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?

    >
    > My husband, an avid cyclist, recently passed away. My mom and dad,
    > attempting to help me dig out from all this stuff, look into the garage
    > and say, two people (my daughter and I) seven bikes, perhaps we could get
    > this back down to two. Well, not quite. It seems three and a half of
    > those bikes are mine. (My "despite my weight I can be fast" carbon fiber
    > road bike, my "going shopping and lunching in my skirt and heels" town
    > bike, and my "the road is too slick for skinny tires but I need a workout
    > anyway" hybrid bike.) I suppose, since my captain is gone, I don't really
    > need the road tandem anymore. I suppose we could get it down to four.
    > Though my daughter is now jonesing for a new bike. Sometimes she thinks
    > she needs another "ride to school" bike, though in three weeks she's
    > graduating to a school she will likely walk to. And sometimes she thinks
    > she needs some lycra and a road bike.


    So what you're saying is I'm not alone?
     
  8. On May 14, 5:35 pm, "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >  I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >
    >  Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one person
    > really needs three bikes?
    >
    >  My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    > relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension X-country
    > MB just 6 years old.
    >
    >  I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    > would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.
    >
    >  So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?


    http://www.starpulse.com/news/index.php/2006/06/19/robin_williams_talks_about_his_bicycle_a
    has A garage with 60 bicycles inside.
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected]/ public photo group
    http://www.bikeaddicts.com/ bicycle shop.
    http://www.wombats.org/addiction.html questionaire.
    http://www.bicyclesource.com/incurable_bikeaholic another
    questionaire.
    http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/lifestyle/trucycle.htm checklist.
    http://www.bikereader.com/solo/ca.html one rider's story.
    http://www.bikereader.com/solo/addicted.html meeting transcript.
    http://www.bikereader.com/contributors/misc/postnup.html marital
    conditional agreement.
    http://www.icebike.org/ for when 3 seasons is not enough.

    http://bikehugger.com/2008/04/oil_addiction_treatment_center.htm the
    evil alternative.
    http://www.bikereader.com/solo/petrol.html coming soon to your
    neighborhood mini-mart.
     
  9. recycled

    recycled Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]m...
    > On May 14, 4:35 pm, "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >>
    >> Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one
    >> person
    >> really needs three bikes?
    >>
    >> My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    >> relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension
    >> X-country
    >> MB just 6 years old.
    >>
    >> I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    >> would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.
    >>
    >> So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?

    >
    >
    > Save yourself a step or two and get an actual road bike.


    I've thought about it. I'm still not sold on it though. I want a little more
    ruggedness than they seem to possess.
     
  10. recycled

    recycled Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Knock yerself out. Maybe get rid of some stuff
    > to make room for more bikes.


    That is an issue. I've been mentally rezoning my bike park area.
     
  11. catzz66

    catzz66 Guest

    recycled wrote:
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]m...
    >> On May 14, 4:35 pm, "recycled" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >>>
    >>> Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one
    >>> person
    >>> really needs three bikes?
    >>>
    >>> My oldest at 12 years is a hardtail mountain bike at the point of being
    >>> relegated to winter/utility status. My other is a full suspension
    >>> X-country
    >>> MB just 6 years old.
    >>>
    >>> I'm looking at a cylco cross for a higher gear ratio and something that
    >>> would give me more bang for putting on road kilometers.
    >>>
    >>> So is there a Bicyclist's Anonymous program or do I go for it?

    >>
    >>
    >> Save yourself a step or two and get an actual road bike.

    >
    > I've thought about it. I'm still not sold on it though. I want a little
    > more ruggedness than they seem to possess.


    Well, sounds like you are just going to have to make a call and live
    with it.
     
  12. Rex Kerr

    Rex Kerr Guest

    recycled wrote:
    >
    > I'm wondering if I have a problem and I need a 12 step program.
    >
    > Being springtime a man's fancy turns to new bicycles. But what one
    > person really needs three bikes?


    Three? You've just started!

    --
    Work and recreation are not often effected at the same time.
    One using a bicycle in business makes an exception to the rule.
    - Dr. Edgar H. Earl, Rochester. (~1892)
     
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