Ti Bolts for Ritchey Stem



H

Henry Morgan

Guest
On 13 May 2004 12:51:42 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
Campagnolo ) wrote:

>hortakiller-<< Does anyone know where I can purchase
>titanium bolts for my Ritchey WCS road stem? >><BR><BR> <<
>it's just that the Ritchey bolts have rust in them
>>><BR><BR>
>
>I wouldn't do this. Ti bolts that need a fair amount of
>torque tend to gall or break. A stem is not a place to have
>things break. Why we don't sell Deda stems with their silly
>ti bolts.

That's why one uses an anti-galling compound on both Ti and
stainless. Ti bolts will not break in this application if
correctly torqued.

>
>Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
>Boulder, CO, 80302
>(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
> costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
C

Chalo

Guest
[email protected] (Richard Chan) wrote:

> I think the bolts that came with WCS stems are
> stainless already. I wouldn't use ordinally
> replacements from HW stores because the standard sets
> have nicely polished heads.

Stainless bolts are almost never polished. Most polished
fasteners on bikes are chrome plated and capable of rusting
in the right conditions. It is exceedingly rare for a bike
parts manufacturer to specify stainless fasteners, because
they are both more expensive and usually weaker than their
carbon steel counterparts.

In my experience as a career machinist, there is no
appreciable difference in quality among common stainless
bolts and screws from different sources. Hardened alloy
steel fasteners-- which are usually black in color-- come in
premium quality varieties which are distiguished by better
finish, tighter tolerances, and certified materials.

Chalo Colina
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Marty Wallace" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Kirby Krieger" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:[email protected]...
> >
> > "Howard Kveck" <[email protected]> wrote in
> > message news:YOURhoward-
> > [email protected]
> > > I'd stay away from hardware store stainless bolts,
> > > too, as they are of unknown quality. Try to find a
> > > good fastener supply place, if you can.
> > >
> >
> > Is this true (about hardware store quality)?
> >
> > Recommendations? Anyone? Thx.
> >
> Hi tensile Allen screws are about as good as you can get.

It still kind of gets down to quality: the ones from
fastener supply places (like Olander or Danforth) are
just better bolts than what you get at the local Orchard
Supply Hardware. Most readily available steel socket head
cap screws are of about the same grade (what you're
referring to as hi tensile), which is roughly in between
grade 5 and grade 8, as I recall (sorry, I left my
Machinery's Handbook at work).

An example of why I don't care for hardware store bolts:
Recently, I had to make some tooling to hold a part; it
involved some 10-32 socket head cap screws, which were to
be tightened and removed with a screw driver handle hex
driver. You can't really make a huge amount of torque
with those. On about the fifth loosening/tightening
cycle, the heads on the OSH brand bolts started popping
off. But the ones from Olander that we got to replace
those have been through at least 300 cycles with no loss.

--
tanx, Howard

"Moby **** was a work of art, What the hell
happened?"

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
H

Henry Morgan

Guest
On 14 May 2004 13:10:21 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
Campagnolo ) wrote:

>ship-<< That's why one uses an anti-galling compound on
>both Ti and stainless. Ti bolts will not break in this
>application if correctly torqued. >><BR><BR>
>
>
>ohhh really???
>
>Deda stems, with lots of antisieze gooped on the bolts,
>still snap, freeze, pull threads out. Ti bolts on a stem
>and many other places on a bicycle is dummmm
>

I believe you. Personally I haven't had any problems with
Ti. I don't know anyone else who has, either, but I can't
and won't argue with your example. I wonder if the Deda
design puts more stresses on the bolts than is prudent?
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:

> ship-<< That's why one uses an anti-galling compound on
> both Ti and stainless. Ti bolts will not break in this
> application if correctly torqued. >><BR><BR>
>
>
> ohhh really???
>
> Deda stems, with lots of antisieze gooped on the bolts,
> still snap, freeze, pull threads out. Ti bolts on a stem
> and many other places on a bicycle is dummmm

Agreed. When they were big fat 7 and 8mm bolts you could
swap to Ti. Now that stem designers have come to scrawny
little 5mm bolts, Ti stem bolts are maybe not safe to ride.

--
Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
April, 1971
 
A

Ajames54

Guest
Will Wright <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Having worked in the titanium business for almost 20
> years, I can tell you a little about bolts. If you buy
> standard titanium bolts made for the chemical industry,
> you would get somewhat weak bolts. These would be around
> 50,000psi yield strength much similar to a hardware store
> stove bolt (little stronger). These are made from
> commercially pure titanium and not alloyed to add
> strength.
>
> If you bought aircraft quality the strength would go up
> considerably to about 70,000psi or more. The alloys like
> ti-6al-4v would be what you would be looking for and be
> very common. Other alloys are even stronger and may be
> harder to find.
>
> One way to find out if what you are trying to do is safe
> is to find the existing bolt strength either from the
> manufacture of from the letter stamped on the bolt head,
> if there is one. For example many automotive bolts are
> stamped and used in specific locations. Compare this
> strength to the titanium alloy bolt.
>
> The alloy bolt, although not good for many chemical
> applications should not corrode in your application.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> John P.S. Try Titanium Fabrication Corp in Fairfield, NJ
> --Sales Div
>
>
> On Wed, 12 May 2004 19:51:12 -0400, "8cht"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Does anyone know where I can purchase titanium bolts for
> >my Ritchey WCS road stem? I'm not concerned about the
> >weight difference, it's just that the Ritchey bolts have
> >rust in them and I'd like to avoid that with ti bolts.
> >Also, exactly what size and type of bolts do I need to
> >replace the four on the face plate and the two bolts on
> >the back of the stem? Thanks in advance.
> >

I don't know the stem in question but I would be far more
concerned about the internal threads in what is I assume
aluminum, than I would be about the UTS of the fastener..

That being said Ti and Alu do not go well together...
(if the stem isn't aluminum please fell free to ignore
the comment)