Ti for cyclocross

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Matthew Thomas, Feb 25, 2003.

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  1. I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I asked a
    cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much. Is this
    true? I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex in it.

    thanks, Matt
     
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  2. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Matthew Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I asked a
    > cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much. Is
    > this true? I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex in it.

    You already have your answer. That said, I think the best value is in steel and the
    lightest-cheapest are aluminum.

    Robin Hubert
     
  3. Jim Edgar

    Jim Edgar Guest

    Matthew Thomas at [email protected] wrote on 2/25/03 7:32 AM:
    > I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I asked a
    > cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much. Is
    > this true? I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex in it.

    It's a sad thing, midseason in Cross... All these discarded noodly titanium cross frames, spread
    across the landscape, rotting in the landfills, discarded like old apple cores. . .

    - or -

    1 - Frame fit

    2 - Clearance for Mud and stuff

    3 - Materials

    A pertinent question or two for your buddy, "Hunh? Which one was that exactly you're talking about?
    How long did you ride it?"

    There's a ton of good cross frames around now. Steel gives clearance, Alu gives slightly lighter
    weight, Ti is probably just beyond most crosser's winter budget, but would tend to have better
    clearance, light weight and all that non-ferrous weather resistance.
     
  4. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Jim Edgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BA80DBA1.38D8D%[email protected]...
    > Matthew Thomas at [email protected] wrote on 2/25/03 7:32 AM:
    > > I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I asked
    > > a cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much.
    > > Is this true? I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex
    > > in it.
    >
    > It's a sad thing, midseason in Cross... All these discarded noodly
    titanium
    > cross frames, spread across the landscape, rotting in the landfills, discarded like old apple
    > cores. . .
    >
    > - or -
    >
    > 1 - Frame fit
    >
    > 2 - Clearance for Mud and stuff
    >
    > 3 - Materials
    >
    > A pertinent question or two for your buddy, "Hunh? Which one was that exactly you're talking
    > about? How long did you ride it?"
    >
    > There's a ton of good cross frames around now. Steel gives clearance, Alu gives slightly lighter
    > weight, Ti is probably just beyond most crosser's winter budget, but would tend to have better
    > clearance, light weight and
    all
    > that non-ferrous weather resistance.
    >

    I don't know about y'all, but my 'cross bike isn't the primary bike in the quiver. As such, it was
    pieced together out of various bits and pieces I had laying around, or could find for cheap.

    I too dabbled a bit in 'cross this last winter (racing's started in San Diego already). I didn't
    know if I'd like it or not, what made a good 'cross frame, and what components were needed. I bought
    a used TET 'cross frame/fork for $175, and for another $2-300, built a complete 'cross bike. I found
    out that my Prestige steel frame rides like a champ, is reasonably light, but may be a bit short
    thru the top tube.

    My recommendation: buy something used, fairly inexpensive. That way, if you decide that you don't
    really like 'cross, you're not out big bucks.

    If you ride a 55cm road frame, I have a Kona 'cross frame/fork for sale that a buddy of mine backed
    out on. Email me for details.

    Mike
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Matthew Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I asked a
    > cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much. Is
    > this true? I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex in it.

    So you are saying that either the incessant cycling rumor mill or your own empirical experience was
    wrong. Gee, I wonder which?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. bigmatt-<< I am contemplating dabbling in cyclocross next fall and am shopping around for a frame. I
    asked a cx-racer buddy of mine about frames and he said Ti was "a no no" because it flexed too much.
    Is this true?

    No...yikes, where do people get these ideas.

    << I ride a Habanero road frame, and at 180 lbs. I can't detect a whole lot of flex in it.

    If Habanero makes a cross frameset, it will be a good one...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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