Tick, tick, tick...



Status
Not open for further replies.
Z

Zilla

Guest
No it's not a bomb, but the little critter kind.

I went riding yesterday for about one hour, and slept soundly last night. When I got to work this
morning, my wife calls and says she found a tick crawling on my pillow. Obviously I must have picked
it up during the ride, but no tick bite on me anywhere - thank you!

Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?

--
- Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
 
K

Ken

Guest
"Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in news:VCaEa.2717$Dc2.979 @fe09.atl2.webusenet.com:
> Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?

DEET based insect repellants suposedly work, but the problem is that ticks jump off tall grass and
bushes onto your clothing, then they crawl up your shirt to your neck. You probably don't want to
use DEET all over your body. A better approach is to inspect your skin (everywhere) immediately
after ending your ride. As long as you get them off at the end of your ride, they can't do much
damage. Look especially under your socks around the edges of your clothing. A friend would be
helpful (sometimes fun, too). Wash your hair vigerously to get them out of your hair.
 
Z

Zilla

Guest
Getting them out of my hair is easy - I don't have any. :) (Except on arms and legs, and, well....)

--
- Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)

"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in news:VCaEa.2717$Dc2.979 @fe09.atl2.webusenet.com:
> > Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?
>
> DEET based insect repellants suposedly work, but the problem is that ticks jump off tall grass and
> bushes onto your clothing, then they crawl up your shirt to your neck. You probably don't want to
> use DEET all over your
body.
> A better approach is to inspect your skin (everywhere) immediately after ending your ride. As long
> as you get them off at the end of your ride,
they
> can't do much damage. Look especially under your socks around the edges
of
> your clothing. A friend would be helpful (sometimes fun, too). Wash your hair vigerously to get
> them out of your hair.
 
S

Stephen Baker

Guest
Zilla says:

>Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?

Not that I've found to be any good. The best way is to do a rigourous "tick check" after any
considerable time spent outdoors. If you have a SigOther to share the check with, it can become
interesting. ;-)

Steve
 
C

crazy6r54

Guest
I went riding yesterday and when I rode over to put down a few Guinness some of the same. The wife
says you bring your friends with you. There was a catipillar on my shoulder and a spider bite on the
underside of my fore- arm. Pests are here to stay.

Fire up MTB 03
 
J

Jd

Guest
[email protected] wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I went riding yesterday and when I rode over to put down a few Guinness some of the same. The wife
> says you bring your friends with you. There was a catipillar on my shoulder<snip>

Was it a D9?

JD needs one for racing
 
K

Kara Tyson

Guest
You may want to try something called Permethrin.

Or you could wear a dog collar at the ankles (I know people who do that).

Kara Tyson Lyme Disease Support Group of AL
 
K

Kara Tyson

Guest
Oh, but the Permethrin is just for clothing. Do not put in on your skin.
 
K

Kara Tyson

Guest
[email protected] wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I went riding yesterday and when I rode over to put down a few Guinness some of the same. The wife
> says you bring your friends with you. There was a catipillar on my shoulder and a spider bite on
> the underside of my fore- arm. Pests are here to stay.
>
> Fire up MTB 03
__________________________
Are you absolutly sure this was a spider bite??

Just checking,

Kara Tyson Lyme Disease Support Group of AL
 
W

Wanguard

Guest
"Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Getting them out of my hair is easy - I don't have any. :) (Except on arms and legs, and,
> well....)
>
> --
> - Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
>
>
> "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in news:VCaEa.2717$Dc2.979 @fe09.atl2.webusenet.com:
> > > Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?
> >
> > DEET based insect repellants suposedly work, but the problem is that
ticks
> > jump off tall grass and bushes onto your clothing, then they crawl up
your
> > shirt to your neck. You probably don't want to use DEET all over your
> body.
> > A better approach is to inspect your skin (everywhere) immediately after ending your ride. As
> > long as you get them off at the end of your ride,
> they
> > can't do much damage. Look especially under your socks around the edges
> of
> > your clothing. A friend would be helpful (sometimes fun, too). Wash
your
> > hair vigerously to get them out of your hair.
>

Me not an expert. But me have the same problem and me found following. DEET based stuff seams to be
strongest stuff but it is not very friendly for skin and definitely not to synthetic material.
Brains who are making Autan seams to get an another chemical less aggressive and strong as DEET,
products are AUTAN ACTIVE. Also there are many natural repellents, mostly Citrus based, which comes
even in version that are super good for your skin.

So, browse a bit on a web you will find more detailed information.

D'amir
 
A

Alexn

Guest
"Technician" <[email protected]> wrote

>
> Though now i have a little bottle of Bens 100 Max Formula (95% N,N- diethyl-m-toluamide, whatever
> that is)

That would be Deet.
 
T

Technician

Guest
AlexN <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote
>
> >
> > Though now i have a little bottle of Bens 100 Max Formula (95% N,N- diethyl-m-toluamide,
> > whatever that is)
>
> That would be Deet.
>

Ahh, i see. so why do they feel the need to post the chemical name, when DEET would suffice (most
people know DEET, but not that other name).

And further more, how do they get DEET from "N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide"? if it were up to me, i would
have called it NDMT or something similar.
--
~Travis

travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
 
K

Kathleen

Guest
Technician wrote:

> what's wrong with DEET on skin? The insect repellant i used in the past had DEET, and i would
> cover my arms, legs, neck, behind my ears, and basically any exposed skin that would not sweat
> into my eyes (sprayed my helmet for that part of me).<snip>

The repellent formulas that work the best, the ones with a high concentration of DEET, can cause
chemical burns. I wiped my hand across my forehead - just wiping off sweat - after applying insect
repellent to my arms and legs. The amount that transfered to my skin was enough to give me blistered
burns where my helmet pads touched my forehead. I confine my usage of the high octane stuff to very
light sprayings and only in areas where nothing's going to be pressing or rubbing.

You have to be careful about getting it on plastics, too. I guess if your helmet hasn't melted by
now, it's probably ok.

Kathleen
 
T

Technician

Guest
Kathleen <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> Technician wrote:
>
> > what's wrong with DEET on skin? The insect repellant i used in the past had DEET, and i would
> > cover my arms, legs, neck, behind my ears, and basically any exposed skin that would not sweat
> > into my eyes (sprayed my helmet for that part of me).<snip>
>
> The repellent formulas that work the best, the ones with a high concentration of DEET, can cause
> chemical burns. I wiped my hand across my forehead - just wiping off sweat - after applying insect
> repellent to my arms and legs. The amount that transfered to my skin was enough to give me
> blistered burns where my helmet pads touched my forehead. I confine my usage of the high octane
> stuff to very light sprayings and only in areas where nothing's going to be pressing or rubbing.
>

Hmmm, duly noted. Guess i will apply a thinner layer than normal.

> You have to be careful about getting it on plastics, too. I guess if your helmet hasn't melted by
> now, it's probably ok.
>

Probably the main reason my helmet has not melted is i don't really use insect repellant all that
much. only if riding in a place known to be concentrated with biting insects, and if i don't feel i
will be able to keep in motion enough to keep the blood suckers at bay, then i will apply some
repellant, otherwise i am not bothered by insects. i will usually apply a little on the top of the
cheek bones, just to keep them away from my eyes though. But interestingly, i just happened to start
noticing strange burns under my watch band. guess just washing after a ride is not enough. gotta
wash that fabric watch band too. i'm actually glad you mentioned this as i was getting a little
worried about those burns as they came seemingly from nowhere.
--
~Travis

travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
 
T

Technician

Guest
Technician <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> Kathleen <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> > The repellent formulas that work the best, the ones with a high concentration of DEET, can cause
> > chemical burns.

Just noticed, the other repellant with DEET had only 23%, the new stuff i got has 95%, so i guess it
would be a good idea to use it very sparingly if the other stuff was strong enough to cause burns
under my watch band.

BTW, what is considered a high concentration?
--
~Travis

travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
 
K

Kathleen

Guest
Technician wrote:
> Technician <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
>
>>Kathleen <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
>>
>>>The repellent formulas that work the best, the ones with a high concentration of DEET, can cause
>>>chemical burns.
>>
>
> Just noticed, the other repellant with DEET had only 23%, the new stuff i got has 95%, so i guess
> it would be a good idea to use it very sparingly if the other stuff was strong enough to cause
> burns under my watch band.
>
> BTW, what is considered a high concentration?

The stuff that burned me was about 35%, IIRC. If it was me, I don't think I'd use the 95%
stuff at all. It'd probably be a good idea to just keep your watch in your camelbak. Even if
you don't wind up with chemical burns, after marinating in sweat and insect repellent even
synthetic fabrics will start to stink.

There's something about being bitten, even by an insect, that's disgusting on a visceral
level. At the last flyball tournament we went to, several of us were walking our dogs around
the hotel grounds. There was a snot-nosed urchin - probably 7 or 8 years old - riding his
bike around the grounds, buzzing past us as close as he could manage and barking at the
dogs, trying to get a rise out of them as his trailer trash father and mother watched from
the upstairs balcony, smiling indulgently. Requests to keep the bike away from the dogs
brought no results, and though we briefly fantasized letting one or two of the more
excitable dogs loose "accidentally", the risk was deemed too high. The dogs were current on
their shots, but you can't vaccinate against everything and god only knew what the little
cretin might have been carrying. I got mine, though. While attempting to obtain the best
possible line of attack, the kid had followed us up a hill on the lawn, then went even
further up, into an unmowed area, with grass and weeds grown maybe 2 feet tall, all the
better to gain speed on his kamakazi runs past the dogs. As we prepared to return to our
rooms, I called up to his mother, all helpful concern... "Oh, hey, you'll want to check your
boy over real carefully before bedtime tonight. He was up playing around in the tall grass,
and it's just *loaded* with ticks."

"OMIGAWD!!!! THEO!!!!! GIT YOUR BUTT UP HERE RAHT NAOW!!!!!! "MAAAAAA!!!!"

Kathleen
 
W

Wanguard

Guest
> what's wrong with DEET on skin? The insect repellant i used in the past had DEET, and i would
> cover my arms, legs, neck, behind my ears, and basically any exposed skin that would not sweat
> into my eyes (sprayed my helmet for that part of me).
>
> Though now i have a little bottle of Bens 100 Max Formula (95% N,N- diethyl-m-toluamide, whatever
> that is) that i keep in my bak.
> --
> ~Travis
>
> travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/

It's wrong that it's kind a pesticide. And its applied on your skin when is most wournable. So if
you are not burnt immidiatly like Kathleen was, it's a question of absorbing that agressive
chemichal in your organisam that can result in ... something wrong. For example, you cannot catch
cancer, you develop one with time. So if you can and care, it's wise to avoide bad things.

D'
 
B

Bruce Edge

Guest
On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 20:59:34 -0400, Zilla wrote:

> No it's not a bomb, but the little critter kind.
>
> I went riding yesterday for about one hour, and slept soundly last night. When I got to work this
> morning, my wife calls and says she found a tick crawling on my pillow. Obviously I must have
> picked it up during the ride, but no tick bite on me anywhere - thank you!
>
> Any lotion or spray to persuade these critters to stay away?

Deet works OK, but the best thing is to avoid hitting brush as you go by. I've stopped and examined
some bushes in bad tick areas and you can see clumps of ticks swarming over the end of every branch
and leaf. No amount of deet or anything else is going to save you from that. Wear white socks, make
the little bastards easier to see. I tend to pick them up on my socks (aside from the endo into the
bushes case), so I check them pretty often.

-Bruce
 
T

Technician

Guest
Kathleen <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> Technician wrote:
> > Technician <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> >
> >>Kathleen <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
> >>
> >>>The repellent formulas that work the best, the ones with a high concentration of DEET, can
> >>>cause chemical burns.
> >>
> >
> > Just noticed, the other repellant with DEET had only 23%, the new stuff i got has 95%, so i
> > guess it would be a good idea to use it very sparingly if the other stuff was strong enough to
> > cause burns under my watch band.
> >
> > BTW, what is considered a high concentration?
>
> The stuff that burned me was about 35%, IIRC. If it was me, I don't think I'd use the 95%
> stuff at all. It'd probably be a good idea to just keep your watch in your camelbak. Even if
> you don't wind up with chemical burns, after marinating in sweat and insect repellent even
> synthetic fabrics will start to stink.
>

Well, i tried a good drip on a band-aid, stuck it on my arm, and went for a ride to see if it did
bad things. after a good hour ride, plus the 4 hours extra where i forgot to take it off, and it
left no real burn, just a slightly irritated looking patch that did not feel any different. what
this tells me is, either it does not affect my skin (on my arm anyway) as bad, or my skin is just
really tough. either way, i think i will limit any use to maybe 2 or 3 hours tops (IOW, apply when
the bugs get thick, not before the ride).

That sounds like a good idea with taking the watch off. i usually only wash it once in a while, when
i notice the sweet smell of rotting flesh coming from my wrist. the lack of sweat should improve it
quite a bit, though.
--
~Travis

travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
 
Status
Not open for further replies.