Tied and Soldered?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by hwttdz, Mar 25, 2005.

  1. hwttdz

    hwttdz New Member

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    Why would you tied and solder spokes on a wheel?
     
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  2. serenaslu

    serenaslu New Member

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    The most immediate effect will probably be to receive a whole bunch of contradictory and puzzling opinions of the effectiveness of the practice among different people.:rolleyes:

    Such as the following from Lennard Zinn:

    [size=-1]
    [/size]

     
  3. palewin

    palewin New Member

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    Apparantly a lot of pro teams believe it increases wheel strength, which is why they tie & solder wheels for the cobbled races in Belgium, such as Paris-Roubaix. Take a look at the write-up on Tafi's bike for P-R in the current VeloNews. Tied & Soldered!
     
  4. ritcho

    ritcho New Member

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    For the same reason you throw salt over your left shoulder.

    Ritch
     
  5. hwttdz

    hwttdz New Member

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    Would it make them harder to true? Because if the benefits are questionable but there are no drawbacks I don't see how it could hurt to try it.
     
  6. fish156

    fish156 New Member

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    Not likely, if your spokes are stainless steel. Lead/tin solder does not adhere to s.s. under normal conditions and so, the spoke will turn without any problem. All the tying and soldering really does is to create a mechanical bond between the two spokes that resists a change (under stress) in the geometry between the two spokes and moves some of the stress (of the spoke flexing under the wheel's load) away from the hub. I have heard some use the analogy that this is like a second, outer hub. I recommend getting the wire and solder that are specifically made for this task. Make sure you clean any flux off of each joint, or you will have corrosion that is difficult to get rid of later on. Gerd Schraner has some interesting things to say about tying and soldering in his book. I weigh 195 lbs and did not find that it made any discernable difference in my ride. As they say, your mileage may vary. A nice diversion for someone who has too much time on their hands (and likes to work with them).
     
  7. mitosis

    mitosis New Member

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    You mean to say you throw salt over your shoulder to make your wheels more rigid? LOL.
     
  8. neil0502

    neil0502 New Member

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    And yet ANOTHER opinion. That of Jobst Brandt, author of The Bicycle Wheel.
     
  9. strummer_fan

    strummer_fan New Member

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    Bernard Hinault writes in his bicycle training book that it also helps to keep a broken spoke from interfering with the works by keeping it in place. According to Hinault.... This allows a cyclist to limp home on a broken spoke.
     
  10. Hypnospin

    Hypnospin New Member

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    according to the owner of (now defunct) wheelsmith in palo alto (&los gatos)
    ca., it is a signature of style rather than functional excersise.



     
  11. ganderctr

    ganderctr New Member

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    I was reading on CyclingNews that they do it to keep the wheel truer in the event of a spoke breakage.
     
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