time for a one mile lap swim/workout structure

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Skipthomp48, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Skipthomp48

    Skipthomp48 Guest

    I have no idea where I would fit with all the expereinced swimmers on this site. I do a one mile
    swim, no stopping, no flip turns, in the 48-51minute time frame. No idea whether this is good,
    great, bad, average, slightly above average for a middle aged male? Comments please.

    I do not stop between sets, although not doing a flip turn, I do recognize a get a3- 5 second
    break or so.

    Also, recommendations from the group. I do 3-4 swims per week. From a workout, stroke
    betterment/practice am I better off to move the work out to say one and a half miles, keeping it at
    the 3-4 sessions/swims per week, or should I increase the swims to 5-6 days per week keeping the
    work out at one mile. My only objective other than fitness is to be able to accomplish/enhance my
    open water swimming this summer. Please note, that if I do not switch strokes during the mile I find
    my free style getting sloppy. I generally do one breast, 9 freestyle, one breast,...etc. Problem is
    doing breast in open water wearing a tri wet suit. Thx in advance for the groups comments/critiques.
     
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  2. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In <[email protected]> Skipthomp48 wrote:
    > I have no idea where I would fit with all the expereinced swimmers on this site. I do a one mile
    > swim, no stopping, no flip turns, in the 48-51minute time frame. No idea whether this is good,
    > great, bad, average, slightly above average for a middle aged male? Comments please.

    It's a bit slow compared to the dedicated swimmers in this group, but nothing to be ashamed of.

    We have a wide range of skills represented here. Just for comparison, I'm a 47 year old male. I
    seldom swim my miles continuously (I usually swim sets of 100s and 200s), but wouldn't have any
    trouble doing your workout in about 27 minutes. Larry (our beloved 56 year old doctor) might clock
    something closer to your time. Terry (similar age) on the other hand could easily beat me.

    > Also, recommendations from the group. I do 3-4 swims per week. From a workout, stroke
    > betterment/practice am I better off to move the work out to say one and a half miles, keeping it
    > at the 3-4 sessions/swims per week, or should I increase the swims to 5-6 days per week keeping
    > the work out at one mile.

    You can't do both?

    I'd probably increase yardage, and also mix in a few sets of relatively hard interval work.
    Something to get the heart pounding.

    > My only objective other than fitness is to be able to accomplish/enhance my open water swimming
    > this summer.

    You should practice some open water style then. Every 4th or 6th stroke should be heads-up, so you
    can sight against landmarks on the shore.

    Ross
     
  3. Skipthomp48

    Skipthomp48 Guest

    Thankyou for comments. Yes, I can probably do both, just wondered which of the two might be more
    beneficial. Further, as weather warms I try to get 15-20 miles in a week running (5 miles per run),
    thus there is only so much time in a day. Obviously I have a long way to go to catch you!!!

    My first objective this winter was to consistantly complete a mile at each workout. New objective is
    to lower time. What would you suggest is the best approach to lowering my time to say forty minutes?

    What would you consider "hard interval"? Thx, JPT
     
  4. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In <[email protected]> Skipthomp48 wrote:
    >
    > My first objective this winter was to consistantly complete a mile at each workout. New objective
    > is to lower time. What would you suggest is the best approach to lowering my time to say forty
    > minutes?

    Interval training builds speed. You're interested in long distances, so I'd look at some long
    interval work in addition to your daily mile.

    Whether you can do 3 workouts a week or 6 depends on your schedule. Obviously more would be better.
    I don't do the running you do (I can hardly run a couple blocks), so I swim more.

    > What would you consider "hard interval"?

    That's a personal thing. Basically it's whatever it takes to get your heart rate up to "high" (say,
    160+), followed by the minimal rest to get your pulse back down to merely "pounding" (say, below
    140), and repeat.

    For me, that might be a set of 5x200yd (8 pool lengths) crawl. I can do each 200 in 2:30 - 2:40, so
    I'd start a new interval every 3:00 and rest the remaining 20-30 seconds.

    > Thx, JPT
    >

    Ross
     
  5. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On 20 Feb 2004 22:03:08 GMT, [email protected] (Skipthomp48) wrote:

    >Thankyou for comments. Yes, I can probably do both, just wondered which of the two might be more
    >beneficial. Further, as weather warms I try to get 15-20 miles in a week running (5 miles per run),
    >thus there is only so much time in a day. Obviously I have a long way to go to catch you!!!
    >
    >My first objective this winter was to consistantly complete a mile at each workout. New
    >objective is to lower time. What would you suggest is the best approach to lowering my time to
    >say forty minutes?
    >
    >What would you consider "hard interval"? Thx, JPT

    Just my two cents but at 48-51 minutes a mile I'm guessing there's a bit of room for
    improvement on the technique end of things too. You may make some serious gains doing some
    drill work. 48-51 is roughly 2:45 a hundred, about where I was at when I started, I was even
    a bit slower. I dropped quite a bit 30+ secs on the 100 over 2-3 months working on technique
    alone. Combining the two would probably work wonders.

    ~Matt
     
  6. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 20:33:01 +0000 (UTC), Ross
    Bogue <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Larry (our beloved 56 year old doctor) might clock something closer to your time.

    Seems to me that Larry's talked about doing his 2000s in 32 minutes, or thereabouts, so he might
    keep up with you, Ross.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]alO'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  7. Curt

    Curt Guest

    I am not here to get into a pissing contest on who is fast or whatever. I suggest you read the book
    "Total Immersion". It should help your times without increasing effort. I suspect your form is in
    need of improvement.

    Curt

    "Skipthomp48" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m10.aol.com...
    > Thankyou for comments. Yes, I can probably do both, just wondered which
    of the
    > two might be more beneficial. Further, as weather warms I try to get
    15-20
    > miles in a week running (5 miles per run), thus there is only so much time
    in a
    > day. Obviously I have a long way to go to catch you!!!
    >
    > My first objective this winter was to consistantly complete a mile at each workout. New objective
    > is to lower time. What would you suggest is the best approach to lowering my time to say
    forty
    > minutes?
    >
    > What would you consider "hard interval"? Thx, JPT
     
  8. Mrdancer

    Mrdancer Guest

    "Skipthomp48" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have no idea where I would fit with all the expereinced swimmers on this site. I do a one mile
    > swim, no stopping, no flip turns, in the
    48-51minute
    > time frame. No idea whether this is good, great, bad, average, slightly
    above
    > average for a middle aged male? Comments please.

    Continuous one-mile swim, flip turns, non-stop -- 32-33 minutes -- 35y.o. male

    (started swimming at 18 w/ beginning swimmers class in college (got a C), taught myself the rest,
    learned flip turns in grad school, learned bilateral breathing just a few years ago)

    It's easy to get in a rut when doing endurance swimming. I suggest you do breakout sets (like 10x100
    w/ 30-second intervals, swimming at max speed) every other week to help build up your speed.
     
  9. On 20 Feb 2004 19:18:39 GMT, [email protected] (Skipthomp48) wrote:

    >I have no idea where I would fit with all the expereinced swimmers on this site. I do a one mile
    >swim, no stopping, no flip turns, in the 48-51minute time frame. No idea whether this is good,
    >great, bad, average, slightly above average for a middle aged male? Comments please.

    What, exactly, do you mean by a "mile"? 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by
    competive swimmers. An actual mile in a 25 yd pool would be 70.4 laps. If you're in a 50 meter pool,
    32 laps will get you very close to an actual mile.

    The average 1500 M open water swim split for most triathlons is usually somewhere between 25 and 35
    minutes, depending on weather conditions, legality of wetsuits, whether or not the local community
    has a serious swimming program, etc. If you made that same bunch swim a full mile, it would take
    them about 2 minutes longer.

    >
    >I do not stop between sets, although not doing a flip turn, I do recognize a get a3- 5 second
    >break or so.
    >
    >Also, recommendations from the group. I do 3-4 swims per week. From a workout, stroke
    >betterment/practice am I better off to move the work out to say one and a half miles, keeping it at
    >the 3-4 sessions/swims per week, or should I increase the swims to 5-6 days per week keeping the
    >work out at one mile. My only objective other than fitness is to be able to accomplish/enhance my
    >open water swimming this summer. Please note, that if I do not switch strokes during the mile I
    >find my free style getting sloppy. I generally do one breast, 9 freestyle, one breast,...etc.
    >Problem is doing breast in open water wearing a tri wet suit. Thx in advance for the groups
    >comments/critiques.
    >

    At the pace you're swimming, you could probably improve a great deal by working on both technique
    and power and also by doing better turns (since about 20% of the distance in a 25 yd pool can be
    covered by the push off alone). Get a coach, read an instructional book, join a master's program,
    etc. and also start working in some intervals to improve power.
     
  10. Skipthomp48

    Skipthomp48 Guest

    Swim in a 25 yd and 25 meter pool. The 25 yd is the high school, and 72 laps is a mile. I am told at
    the health club that 66 laps is a mile in the meter pool. I am just taking their word for it.

    Did try some of the suggestions from this site today. timing not exact but 4 laps in the meter pool
    were approx 2 minutes. 33 laps (half mile) at 23minutes. I know recognize after talking with people
    on this site that my turns need to be quicker. It was definityly a harder work out today..JP
     
  11. Oscargrouch

    Oscargrouch Guest

    "Radioactive Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by competive swimmers.

    why?
     
  12. On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 13:01:51 -0500, "oscargrouch"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Radioactive Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by competive swimmers.
    >
    >why?

    I'm not sure exactly why. I don't believe there's any technical reason. The 1650 yd just happens to
    be one of the official distances of U.S. Masters swimming (http://www.usms.org/) and it is often
    referred to as a "mile". You'd have to do some research to find the history on it.
     
  13. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 22 Feb,
    Radioactive Man <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 13:01:51 -0500, "oscargrouch" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Radioactive Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by competive swimmers.
    > >
    > >why?
    >
    > I'm not sure exactly why. I don't believe there's any technical reason. The 1650 yd just happens
    > to be one of the official distances of U.S. Masters swimming (http://www.usms.org/) and it is
    > often referred to as a "mile". You'd have to do some research to find the history on it.
    >
    >
    Equivalent to 1500m
    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  14. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Skipthomp48" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have no idea where I would fit with all the expereinced swimmers on this site. I do a one mile
    > swim, no stopping, no flip turns, in the
    48-51minute
    > time frame. No idea whether this is good, great, bad, average, slightly
    above
    > average for a middle aged male? Comments please.
    >

    I've read the whole thread and it's fascinating to see how people are performing with regards to
    time because with me especially, I just get in the pool and swim without really figuring out how I'm
    doing against other people. Can I canvass opinion on what times people are doing for breaststroke
    alone, any distance? For reference, 25m I can do in 20 seconds whereas endurance (up to 6km) I'm
    running at 1300m per 30 minutes (sorry for the mix of units!).
     
  15. M. W. Smith

    M. W. Smith Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 13:01:51 -0500, oscargrouch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Radioactive Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by competive swimmers.
    >
    > why?

    I never considered it to be a mile. I always considered it to be as close as you can get to 1500
    meters in a pool measured in yards.

    In Norway, 10 kilometers is 1 mile. Norway takes the metric system very seriously.

    martin

    --
    If you are a US citizen, please use your constitutional right to vote, because we badly need a new
    president.
     
  16. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In <[email protected]> Donal Fagan wrote:
    >
    > Seems to me that Larry's talked about doing his 2000s in 32 minutes, or thereabouts, so he might
    > keep up with you, Ross.

    :) I'm getting slower every year, but Larry just keeps improving. It won't be long before I'm
    :struggling to keep up with him.

    And a general response to the others who have responded to this thread: Good ideas, all of them. I
    agree with all of you. Get a coach, read that book, join a club.

    Ross
     
  17. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 01:05:54 GMT, Radioactive Man
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What, exactly, do you mean by a "mile"? 1650 yds (66 laps in a 25 yd pool) is considered a mile by
    >competive swimmers. An actual mile in a 25 yd pool would be 70.4 laps.

    Our 25 yd pool posts a list with a mile at 72 lengths, which would be 5400 feet, and a lap as
    two lengths.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  18. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:00:25 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >>Our 25 yd pool posts a list with a mile at
    72 lengths, which would be 5400 feet, and a lap as two lengths.<<

    >Last time I checked a "mile" was 5280 feet or 1760 yards. For a 25 yard length pool lane, this
    >equals 70.4 lengths per mile. You do the math.

    I actually posted the math, and that's what our pool uses. I 'd swim 70 lengths and call it close
    enough, but I suppose someone feels it is better to swim a little longer than a little shorter.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  19. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 15:45:56 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >No way of getting around it, a true "mile" (i.e. land mile) is a mile at 5280 feet, ...

    Everyone knows that, but the question was "what is a 'mile' in the pool." Few, if any pools, have a
    length that divides evenly into 1760 yards, and some people use the 'metric mile' of 1650 yards.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  20. Helgi Briem

    Helgi Briem Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 01:10:00 GMT, Donal Fagan <[email protected]hlink.net>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 15:45:56 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:
    >
    >>No way of getting around it, a true "mile" (i.e. land mile) is a mile at 5280 feet, ...
    >
    >Everyone knows that, but the question was "what is a 'mile' in the pool." Few, if any pools, have a
    >length that divides evenly into 1760 yards, and some people use the 'metric mile' of 1650 yards.

    The ridiculous vagaries of the archaic system of measurements you yanks use is a never-ending
    source of amusement to me. When are you people going to drag yourselves kicking and screaming into
    the 21st century?
     
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