time for a one mile lap swim/workout structure

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Skipthomp48, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Mrdancer

    Mrdancer Guest

    "Helgi Briem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > The ridiculous vagaries of the archaic system of measurements you yanks use is a never-ending
    > source of amusement to me. When are you people going to drag yourselves kicking and screaming into
    > the 21st century?

    Well, you see, our system is designed to be unnecessarily complex so as to make us work our brains
    harder, thus leading us to be more intelligent all-around thinkers. Or something like that. ;-)
     


  2. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 09:58:03 +0000, Helgi Briem
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The ridiculous vagaries of the archaic system of measurements you yanks use is a never-ending
    >source of amusement to me.

    We live to brighten your day.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  3. Dave Rusin

    Dave Rusin Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Helgi Briem <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When are you people going to drag yourselves kicking and screaming into the 21st century?

    Probably around the 22nd or 23rd.
     
  4. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 22:15:49 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >Well, then I suppose we're arguing semantics: literal "mile" vs figurative "mile."

    Maybe semantics, maybe just practical approximation. If you train near a quarter mile track, you can
    easily run a literal mile by doing four laps.

    Pools aren't built around the mile. Unless you have maybe a 20, 22 or 40 yard pool, you would have
    to start or finish some distance from the wall to swim a precise mile.

    Swimming a mile doesn't interest me, I always aim for 500, 1000, 1500 yards, etc. But I guess they
    don't call them "milestones" for nothing because a lot of fitness swimmers do count in miles and our
    YMCA even keeps a chart of top ten miles swum and water-walked every year.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  5. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 25 Feb,
    Donal Fagan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pools aren't built around the mile. Unless you have maybe a 20, 22 or 40 yard pool, you would have
    > to start or finish some distance from the wall to swim a precise mile.

    I swim every Saturday in a 36.67 yard pool, 48 lengths is exactly a mile. There are also
    27½yard pools around, 64 lengths will be exactly a mile in those. A 25m pool is about 8 metres
    short of a mile.

    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  6. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 01:03:36 GMT, Brian D
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A 25m pool is about 8 metres short of a mile.

    So 25m + 8m = 1 mile? I've got the metric system all wrong. :)

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  7. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 14:55:42 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >Donal Fagan's latest post for this thread:

    Who is twisting *your* arm?

    >Whether a pool length is suited for a precise mile distance (being divisible by a whole number of
    >lengths or laps) is irrelevant.

    Not to me.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  8. Helgi Briem

    Helgi Briem Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 01:03:36 GMT, Brian D <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 25 Feb, Donal Fagan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Pools aren't built around the mile. Unless you have maybe a 20, 22 or 40 yard pool, you would
    >> have to start or finish some distance from the wall to swim a precise mile.
    >
    >I swim every Saturday in a 36.67 yard pool, 48 lengths is exactly a mile. There are also
    >27½yard pools around, 64 lengths will be exactly a mile in those. A 25m pool is about 8 metres
    >short of a mile.

    Really? So a mile is 33 metres? I didn't know that ;-)
     
  9. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 26 Feb,
    Donal Fagan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 01:03:36 GMT, Brian D <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >A 25m pool is about 8 metres short of a mile.
    >
    > So 25m + 8m = 1 mile? I've got the metric system all wrong. :)
    >
    Oops, I missed out a bit, 64 lengths in a 25m pool is about 8 metres short of a mile.

    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  10. Brian D

    Brian D Guest

    On 26 Feb,
    Helgi Briem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 01:03:36 GMT, Brian D <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On 25 Feb, Donal Fagan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> Pools aren't built around the mile. Unless you have maybe a 20, 22 or 40 yard pool, you would
    > >> have to start or finish some distance from the wall to swim a precise mile.
    > >
    > >I swim every Saturday in a 36.67 yard pool, 48 lengths is exactly a mile. There are also 27½yard
    > >pools around, 64 lengths will be exactly a mile in those. A 25m pool is about 8 metres short of
    > >a mile.
    >
    > Really? So a mile is 33 metres? I didn't know that ;-)
    See other post, a brainfart. I missed out a little bit, like the first 63 lengths ;^)
    --
    BD add 1 to from address to reply [13435]
     
  11. Helgi Briem

    Helgi Briem Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 12:26:32 GMT, Brian D <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> >I swim every Saturday in a 36.67 yard pool, 48 lengths is exactly a mile. There are also 27½yard
    >> >pools around, 64 lengths will be exactly a mile in those. A 25m pool is about 8 metres short of
    >> >a mile.
    >>
    >> Really? So a mile is 33 metres? I didn't know that ;-)

    >See other post, a brainfart. I missed out a little bit, like the first 63 lengths ;^)

    No probs. That's what Usenet is all about, anyway. Pedantically correcting other people's trivial
    errors and thereby reinforcing your sense of superiority.
     
  12. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 21:13:22 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >Whether a pool length is suited for a precise mile distance (being divisible by a whole number of
    >lengths or laps) is irrelevant.

    >>Not to me.

    > OK, what is the relevance? And, why?

    Per SkipThomp48: "The mile I defined in the original post here was:
    1) Local High School defines its 25 yd pool mile at 72 laps."

    72 lengths would be 1800 yards.

    "2) Health club at 66 laps in a 25 meter pool."

    66 lengths would be 1650 meters, about 1804 yards.

    "Again this is what the staff at these two institutions post to the general public."

    And that's what they tell people at my pool, too.

    Now you can tell us how far a real mile is, as if we didn't know ... again.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  13. Oscargrouch

    Oscargrouch Guest

    agreed...why they take the pool i swim in, which is a perfectly good 50m X 25m, and carve it up into
    two 25 yard pools, is beyond me

    "Helgi Briem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 01:10:00 GMT, Donal Fagan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 15:45:56 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:
    > >
    > >>No way of getting around it, a true "mile" (i.e. land mile) is a mile at 5280 feet, ...
    > >
    > >Everyone knows that, but the question was "what is a 'mile' in the pool." Few, if any pools,
    > >have a length that divides evenly into 1760 yards, and some people use the 'metric mile' of
    > >1650 yards.
    >
    > The ridiculous vagaries of the archaic system of measurements you yanks use is a never-ending
    > source of amusement to me. When are you people going to drag yourselves kicking and screaming into
    > the 21st century?
     
  14. M. W. Smith

    M. W. Smith Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 09:05:32 -0500, oscargrouch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > agreed...why they take the pool i swim in, which is a perfectly good 50m X 25m, and carve it up
    > into two 25 yard pools, is beyond me

    You wouldn't want to, of course, if you can run 25m lanes across it. But if it was 50m by only 20m
    or something, then it makes sense to have a movable boom so you can split into two 25m pools and
    double the number of training groups that can train simultaneously.

    martin

    --
    If you are a US citizen, please use your constitutional right to vote, because we badly need a new
    president.
     
  15. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 11:01:24 -0800 (PST),
    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote:

    >Then why not just call it an 1800 yard swim rather than a mile?

    Who wants to do an 1800 yard swim?

    >Again, call it a 1650 meter swim.

    Who wants to do a 1650 meter swim?

    >The horse died long ago, yet it's still being beaten.

    Again, who is twisting your arm? I'm just telling you the way things are done. Folks want to swim a
    mile and 72 lengths will get them a mile and change.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  16. Tony Bryant

    Tony Bryant Guest

    [email protected] (Steve Curtis) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >>Our 25 yd pool posts a list with a mile at 72 lengths, which would be
    > 5400 feet, and a lap as two lengths.<<
    >
    >
    > Last time I checked a "mile" was 5280 feet or 1760 yards. For a 25 yard length pool lane, this
    > equals 70.4 lengths per mile. You do the math.
    >
    > Steve Curtis

    A little etymology combined with some Latin.

    "Mile" derives from the Latin "Milia Passuum", meaning 1000 paces. (reference
    http://laser.physics.sunysb.edu/~wise/wise187/janfeb2001/weblinks/physics_words.html).

    To the Roman soldier a pace consisted of bringing one foot forward, then the other to reach the same
    state as at the beginning of the pace (much the same situation as the debate here on what
    constitutes a lap). With a stride length of about 80 cm this would make a Roman mile about 1600 m or
    very similar to the modern concept.
     
  17. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On 26 Feb 2004 18:33:50 -0800,
    [email protected] (Tony Bryant) wrote:

    >A little etymology combined with some Latin.
    >
    >"Mile" derives from the Latin "Milia Passuum", meaning 1000 paces. (reference
    >http://laser.physics.sunysb.edu/~wise/wise187/janfeb2001/weblinks/physics_words.html).
    >
    >To the Roman soldier a pace consisted of bringing one foot forward, then the other to reach the
    >same state as at the beginning of the pace (much the same situation as the debate here on what
    >constitutes a lap). With a stride length of about 80 cm this would make a Roman mile about 1600 m
    >or very similar to the modern concept.

    Yeah, and according to dictionary.com, a mile represents radically different distances in different
    countries.

    >>>
    Note: The distance called a mile varies greatly in different countries. Its length in yards is, in
    Norway, 12,182; in Brunswick, 11,816; in Sweden, 11,660; in Hungary, 9,139; in Switzerland,
    8,548; in Austria, 8,297; in Prussia, 8,238; in Poland, 8,100; in Italy, 2,025; in England and
    the United States, 1,760; in Spain, 1,552; in the Netherlands, 1,094.
    >>>

    Also, one definition of mile is 'A relatively great distance' or some such.

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  18. Helgi Briem

    Helgi Briem Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 04:43:22 GMT, Donal Fagan <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>>>
    >Note: The distance called a mile varies greatly in different countries. Its length in yards is, in
    > Norway, 12,182; in Brunswick, 11,816; in Sweden, 11,660; in Hungary, 9,139; in Switzerland,
    > 8,548; in Austria, 8,297; in Prussia, 8,238; in Poland, 8,100; in Italy, 2,025; in England
    > and the United States, 1,760; in Spain, 1,552; in the Netherlands, 1,094.
    >>>>
    >
    >Also, one definition of mile is 'A relatively great distance' or some such.

    Not only that, but the definitions of feet, inches, yards, ounces, pints and pounds and other
    imperial units also vary from country to country and time to time.

    Go metric already.
     
  19. Diablo

    Diablo Guest

    of course, if oscarthegrouch is actually an american, it makes sense to carve it up into 2 25y pools
    - then they can hold championship SC meets. with only a 50m, (assuming theres no warm down facility)
    they can't.

    if hes not a yank however, then yeah, its a dumbass move.

    "m. w. smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 09:05:32 -0500, oscargrouch <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > agreed...why they take the pool i swim in, which is a perfectly good 50m X 25m, and carve it up
    > > into two 25 yard pools, is beyond me
    >
    > You wouldn't want to, of course, if you can run 25m lanes across it. But if it was 50m by only 20m
    > or something, then it makes sense to have a movable boom so you can split into two 25m pools and
    > double the number of training groups that can train simultaneously.
    >
    > martin
    >
    > --
    > If you are a US citizen, please use your constitutional right to vote, because we badly need a new
    > president.
     
  20. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 15:08:26 +0000, diablo wrote:

    > of course, if oscarthegrouch is actually an american, it makes sense to carve it up into 2 25y
    > pools - then they can hold championship SC meets. with only a 50m, (assuming theres no warm down
    > facility) they can't.
    >
    > if hes not a yank however, then yeah, its a dumbass move.
    >
    >
    Saving, of course, the oh-my-gosh-yards-while-kinda-dumb-are-really-fun-to-race factor. Personally
    I'd rather in favour of a 15m competition pool or, I dunno, a World Cup of Water Sliding tour or
    something. Only partly tongue in cheek.

    --Mike
     
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