Time on the bike

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by baggie, May 13, 2004.

  1. baggie

    baggie Guest

    Hi all.

    I come from a very mediocre running background, and since running a
    marathon I've injured my leg, so now spending more time on the bike
    until I get fit again, but I was thinking how much time would you have
    to spend on the bike, to say run the equiv of 50kms a week?

    Also is a long slow bike ride the best way to lose weight??

    Many thanks!



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  2. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch Guest

    baggie wrote:
    > Hi all.
    > I come from a very mediocre running background, and since running a
    > marathon I've injured my leg, so now spending more time on the bike
    > until I get fit again, but I was thinking how much time would you have
    > to spend on the bike, to say run the equiv of 50kms a week?
    > Also is a long slow bike ride the best way to lose weight??
    > Many thanks!




    Well, if you are carrying an injured leg that may govern how you ride,
    but generally yeah - longer/easier is better for weight loss (but you
    need to eat on longer rides to avoid the dreaded bonk! - and the post-
    ride pigout). 'Drs' will no doubt mention the case for more total fat-
    calories burned if riding harder but IMHO that's a great theory without
    much day-in-day-out practicality (sorry Drs :rolleyes: )

    Any idea what kind of wattage/energy expenditure/Heart-rate you go thru
    on your 50k/week? that might be a good guide



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  3. baggie

    baggie Guest

    flyingdutch, I've injured the lower front part of my leg, the front
    tendon to be exact, so very painful when running, I'm thinking I won't
    be running again for another 4-6 weeks at least. It happend post
    marathon about 3 weeks ago.

    So for the last 14 days, I've been doing 1-2 spin classes per day,
    firstly trying to keep some kind of fitness but I want to lose weight.

    When I was running I was doing a long run of upto 30k (3.5 hrs) each
    weekend with 20-30k in the week, so I was getting through some calories
    I think, although they were done at a moderate intensity, I've just
    bought a HRM so could say what the levels there were.

    I bought a roadie for my first tri a month or so ago, so I'm thinking
    with my 7 or so spin classes mid week, I could knock out a 3-4 hour ride
    on the weekend, and I should mantain the cardio fitness, plus if I
    control what I eat more now, I will lose some weight (it is there to
    lose) so when I hit the running again I'll be lighter hopefully.

    what do you think?



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  4. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "flyingdutch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    [...]

    > Well, if you are carrying an injured leg that may govern how you ride,
    > but generally yeah - longer/easier is better for weight loss (but you
    > need to eat on longer rides to avoid the dreaded bonk! - and the post-
    > ride pigout). 'Drs' will no doubt mention the case for more total fat-
    > calories burned if riding harder but IMHO that's a great theory
    > without much day-in-day-out practicality (sorry Drs :rolleyes: )


    Say what? It's a fact. The harder you work the more calories you burn.
    Taking it stupidly easy just to keep your heart rate below some arbitrary
    number simply doesn't work you hard enough. You might as well stay in bed.

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  5. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch Guest

    Drs wrote:
    > Say what? It's a fact. The harder you work the more calories you burn.
    > Taking it stupidly easy just to keep your heart rate below some
    > arbitrary number simply doesn't work you hard enough. You might as well
    > stay in bed.




    I agree! Stuipdly easy isnt what i was selling. 'Moderate' would be more
    appropriate. especially for a guy nursing an injury!

    "Taking it stupidly easy just to keep your heart rate below some
    arbitrary number simply doesn't work you hard enough. You might as well
    stay in bed."

    Yeah, what would all those Eurpoean Pro's know?:D :D :D

    Take a look at Jan Ullrich's pre-season training regime (he is notorious
    for huge weight fluctuations in off-season). 6-7hrs a day at 50-60% MHR



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  6. Andy Simpson

    Andy Simpson Guest

    baggie wrote:
    > Hi all.
    >
    > I come from a very mediocre running background, and since running a
    > marathon I've injured my leg, so now spending more time on the bike
    > until I get fit again, but I was thinking how much time would you have
    > to spend on the bike, to say run the equiv of 50kms a week?
    >
    > Also is a long slow bike ride the best way to lose weight??
    >
    > Many thanks!


    I'm originally from a running background too, but mostly off-road. I started
    doing a fair bit of cycling when I couldn't run because of injury (and now
    I'm gradually switching back). I reckon a 300km week on the bike was about
    the same as an 85-90km running week, in terms of how fit I felt. So maybe
    150-180 km ?

    Of course there is riding and there is riding, as with running. Your regular
    8km blobby run wouldn't be as good for fitness/speed/stamina as a mix of
    fast runs, speed-work and long-run. Similarly for running.

    I've found that riding takes up much more time, but you don't feel as sore
    afterwards. This does mean that you can build up to riding proportionally
    further/longer faster than you can build up to running long distances (as
    you've probably found out).

    have fun,
    Andy
     
  7. Owen

    Owen Guest

    On Thu, 13 May 2004 07:38:00 +0000, baggie wrote:

    > Hi all.
    >
    > I come from a very mediocre running background, and since running a
    > marathon I've injured my leg, so now spending more time on the bike until
    > I get fit again, but I was thinking how much time would you have to spend
    > on the bike, to say run the equiv of 50kms a week?
    >
    > Also is a long slow bike ride the best way to lose weight??



    Do a Google search on calories and exercise.
    This one isn't too bad

    http://www.caloriecontrol.org/exercalc.html

    You have to ride a real lot more than running to burn off the same
    calories




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    Owen

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    __0 http://www.pcug.org.au/~rcook/rr.html for rides
    _ \<,_
    (_)./(_) http://weather.smh.com.au/weather/canberra.html
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  8. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum Guest

    wrote:
    > Do a Google search on calories and exercise. This one isn't too bad
    > http://www.caloriecontrol.org/exercalc.htmlhttp://www.caloriecontrol.or-
    > g/exercalc.html
    > You have to ride a real lot more than running to burn off the
    > same calories
    > --
    > Owen




    It would really depend on how efficiently you were at either of these
    activities, and what intensity you were exercising at. Those calorie
    calculators are worth 3/10ths of not very much.



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  9. baggie

    baggie Guest

    well today I did a very hilly 85kms, when I got home I crashed and
    am still knackered, it would have easily beaten me up as much as a
    25-30k run.

    The good thing about being injured and forcing you to hit the bike is,
    that you see a LOT more of your country!

    My arse is very sore, really should get som niks....



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  10. eb

    eb Guest

    >>>>> "Roadie" == Roadie scum <Roadie_scum> writes:

    Roadie> wrote:
    >> Do a Google search on calories and exercise. This one isn't too
    >> bad
    >> http://www.caloriecontrol.org/exercalc.htmlhttp://www.caloriecontrol.or-
    >> g/exercalc.html You have to ride a real lot more than running to
    >> burn off the same calories -- Owen




    Roadie> It would really depend on how efficiently you were at either
    Roadie> of these activities, and what intensity you were exercising
    Roadie> at. Those calorie calculators are worth 3/10ths of not very
    Roadie> much.

    I thought anyone with an ounce of common would be able to see that.
    It's quite feasible to ride with you heart rate not exceeding 110. On
    the other hand it's just as feasible to maintain a heart rate of 160.

    Running, well you're generally up around about 130 unless you're taking
    it really easy.
    --
    Regards
    Euan
     
  11. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    "baggie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > well today I did a very hilly 85kms, when I got home I crashed and
    > am still knackered, it would have easily beaten me up as much as a
    > 25-30k run.
    >
    > The good thing about being injured and forcing you to hit the bike is,
    > that you see a LOT more of your country!
    >
    > My arse is very sore, really should get som niks....
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    >


    yeah fitness can be very sport specific as you use different sets of muscles
    differently for running as to cycling.
    I'd take it easy at first and build your way up in cycling...ie. do some
    flat rides and gradually increase distance, throw a few hill climbs in and
    go from there....don't overdo it though.....got any mates who are cyclists
    too? Talk to them and go with them on their rides, if not try the local bike
    clubs...they have bunch rides that will have several knowledgable riders.

    good luck
     
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