time trial bike??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by oneradtec, Jan 3, 2004.

  1. oneradtec

    oneradtec New Member

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    I am making a frugal attempt to build a dedicated time trial bike.
    I don't want to spend 2,500 u.s. dollars or more.

    I have an older Italian 'Ciocc' lugged steel frame with a chrome fork and chromed rear triangle(columbus tubes). It's in perfect condition without a single scratch and a beautiful multi colored glossy paint.

    I was thinking of adding a modern set of aero wheels and dedicated Time Trial handlebars with the shifters at the end of the aero bars.

    Also...I have an old set of Dura Ace 8-speed components lying around....Perhaps I will use this groupset...since I believe that I could get by just fine with 8 speeds on time trials that are mostly flat.

    Perhaps I might need to add a seat post that is angled forward to shift my body in the true TT position.

    What do you experienced TT'ers think about this set up? I would ensure that I didn't cut costs when it comes to the wheel set. Do you think this will cost me in performance..even if I train hard. Should I forget it and just buy a modern machine and break the bank?

    Please help...as I plan to do Master's Nationals TT.

    Greg Lemond rode a similar set up in the final days TT into Paris at the '89 Tour de France...and I believe that it still stands as the fastest TT in tour history...and stands up still today against all the modern riders and their space age bikes. Strong heart, legs and lungs will prevail heh?
     
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  2. pedalhome

    pedalhome New Member

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    My best recommendation is to get yourself a Look Ergostem. Position of the stem/bars in relation to the body is one of the biggest position factors that riders overlook when setting up TT bikes. Of course wheels are the best thing to spend a lot of money on...but frame, seatpost, components...less important in my mind.

    The Look Ergostem gives you almost unlimited position choices for you upper body. I actually change mine around to suit the TT distance/profile. If it's a short prologue...I go a bit lower. If it's a longer, climbing TT (TT at the Tour of the Gila in NM is a good example), than I raise it up to reach more of a power, climbing position.

    Well, that's my suggestion. The look stem will have a little bit of flex in it, but who cares? You're not sprinting on it. I've used one for 3 years now with really good results. Try it.

    michael
     
  3. Rudy

    Rudy New Member

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    The one question I would ask you is that...how long is your current road bike's top tube?
    TT bike usually runs a little smaller or more specifically shorter on the top tube in order for you to be able to get into a more comfortable and aero position while resting your arms on the aerobars. The elbow while resting the aerobar pads are ALMOST at a 90 degrees angle. So start there and see. Competitive TT bikes usually have a much lower handlebar position (lower than the saddle level) but if your top tube is too long, you may want to raise the handle bar (flip the stem?) to be able to get into an aero position, albeit not as aero as that of a true TT bike.
    Yes a seatpost that allows you to get closer to the aerobars would also help. Check into the Look or BP Ergo carbon or BP Stealth seatposts. They can be adjusted fore and aft by 2 or 2.5 inches, then you can still move the saddle forward along its rail to get more forwarded. They have a curve that you can turn them around to get more .... closer to the aerobar.
    But fit and comfort is very important, so I would start there before spending tons of cash on a set of wheels because you may need a new frame.
    Sure, strong heart and lungs, legs are everything.
    GL
     
  4. Aztec

    Aztec New Member

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    If you are looking to get into an aggressive aero position, your frame will not work. A 73d seat tube -- even with a seatpost angled forward, if you can find one -- is too slack. You want to maintain your hip/torso angle, but when you lower the bars to get your back closer to parallel to the ground, you will be closing that hip/torso angle (i.e., your knees will hit your chest, or come closer to doing so). That assumes you can get your bars down low enough in the first place.

    With your budget, just go and buy a TT bike. You can get a Cervelo Dual -- a very good set up -- for $1600. Skip all the fancy wheels and stuff. The first thing is to get FIT into the aero position correctly. That will make infinitely more difference than slick wheels.
     
  5. Kirkster

    Kirkster New Member

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