Time Trial postion sitting on 1 side more?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Sam123, Jun 22, 2014.

  1. Sam123

    Sam123 New Member

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    Time trialing.. has anyone had the feeling of sitting on one side of the saddle? I seem to and its slightly chafes me
     
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  2. AyeYo

    AyeYo Member

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    This might sound ridiculously obvious, but have you actually looked at the saddle? I've been wondering for weeks now why my right ass check was getting chaffed far more than normal. Just the other day I was taking my multi tool out of my saddle bag and noticed that the saddle was actually cocked to one side. The rails somehow torqued in the mount such that, while it was still pointed straight, the right rear was actually a good half inch higher than the left. It wasn't really noticable unless standing directly behind the bike at eye level with the saddle.

    Cliff notes: make sure the saddle is physically straight and level first.
     
  3. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Maybe the saddle's on crooked, maybe you have a leg that's shorter than the other, maybe your pelvis is injured, maybe you're unconsciously favoring one side, or maybe, as AgeYo suggested, your saddle is bent.

    If the equipment checks out, I suggest seeing a chiropractor and a fitter, in that order.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I agree with OBC.

    Every cyclist that I have observed riding ‘side-saddle’ had physiological issues…foot, leg and/or back problems.

    From simple muscular issues that were easily correctable to leg length mis-match to spine problems to joint problems…if your bike checks out OK it is time to get yourself to a sports orthopedic specialist.
     
  5. Colnago62

    Colnago62 New Member

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    I have about a 5mm spacer between my sole and cleat on my left side. It makes all the difference in the world. Find a person who has the skills to evaluate your position on the bike.
     
  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    You have to learn about your body and make adaptations for it.

    Years (decades) ago, I met a local (to New England) celebrity, an ex-ski and bicycle racer who was still riding and promoting the best road races in the Northeast. He had his cycling shoes off, for some reason, and I could clearly inspect the most motley but ingenious combinations of handmade wooden and plastic wedges and shims between the cleats and the soles of his shoes. From ski racing before the era of good releasable bindings, he must have broken every bone below the hips at least once and his legs had long ago forgotten what length they were supposed to mend to.
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    What Colnago62 said.

    If you even slightly suspect you have something like a difference in leg length, curvature of the spine, have lived a life that abused your body (Campy raises a hand to numbers 1 and 3!) or the like...seek out the best sports physiologist/doctor/guru you can find. Some coaches and trainers are well versed in correcting orthopedic abnormalities.

    From cleat shims to shoe inserts to orthopedic devices there are lots of ways to get 'straight' on your bike. Some folks only require pre-ride stretching or strength exercises and maybe a minor tweak to the bike's dimensions to get a comfortable fit that is easy on the body.
     
  8. Sam123

    Sam123 New Member

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    Body is fine legs all the same length off the bike I am actually highly functional, checked saddle and it is straight. I have never had it on any other bikes
     
  9. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    The more rotated hip position of the TT position may be causing your body to compensate for something that a more conventional riding position has not.

    Either that or your TT bike is crooked. [​IMG]

    At this point I'm guessing it's something in your bike setup that is causing you to ride to one side of the saddle as opposes to being centered on it...trying to avoid the chaffing.

    New saddle time? Lower the saddle? Nose down the saddle a little? Ride a little more rearward on the saddle (slide saddle forward)? A slightly shorter stem to reduce extension?
     
  10. Sam123

    Sam123 New Member

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    I reckon it could be the saddle, as I use to have back pain with the saddle being to forward as it use to force me in a posterior tilt so I moved it back, and tilt it very slightly overall I'm much more comfy just the chafing to 1 side.. The saddle was a cheapish one of ebay... so..
     
  11. Colnago62

    Colnago62 New Member

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    Have you had your legs measured? I didn't know I had a difference until I had my legs measured. I began riding seriously before clip less pedals. Riding with toe clips wasn't an issue. I was told that toe clips allowed for much more give. When I switched to clip less is when I noticed some tension in my joints and difficulty being comfortable on the saddle.
     
  12. Aerodynamics

    Aerodynamics New Member

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    Leg length is all fine no imbalances it maybe just the shape of the saddle I will look at others
     
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