Time Trial Training Help

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by gregkeller, Aug 31, 2014.

  1. gregkeller

    gregkeller New Member

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    OK, so here's the deal. I've been an on again, off again cyclist for a handful of years. More off than on, but i've got the bug and want to get into good shape. Have a new kid (2 months old) who is taking up the majority of my time, and rightfully so i'd rather spend time with him than out on my bike, but the bike helps me keep my sanity also.

    Here are my goals, and i'd love some help. Here in NJ we have a nice TT series that spans April-August with 12 events, nothing longer than a 40k, and most of them in the 15-30 minute effort range. I'd like to do well in these. That's it. I don't want to do any mass start races, I don't want/need to do any 100 mile rides. I really just want to get really good at these <1hr efforts. In the past i've gotten my FTP up to 320-330, but that was with 15 hrs a week on the bike. I can't spend that much time riding now, nor do I really want to.

    I guess my question is am I insane in thinking I can get back to this level of fitness (320+ FTP) on much less training? Remember I really only want to be able to do a 40k TT, so don't feel like I need the a really big base, but then again, I need enough base to be able to handle the tough workouts that come with focused FT training. Not enough base and a threshold workout spanks me so bad I can't ride for a couple of days, or a VO2 workout takes a week to recover from.

    Any help/ideas/advice? A coach at this point isn't in the cards, but might be if I can show myself that I can focus on the bike for the next few months, but I want to prove to myself that i've got the motivation to have a go at this again before I commit to paying for coaching. Thanks in advance guys.
     
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  2. JibberJim

    JibberJim Member

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    Yes, I'm sure you can get to that on ~8 hours a week, I had no trouble getting back to where I was before the baby was born on much less training, even totally unstructured riding training with a serious bit of effort over a relatively short time period got me back for the shorter durations, the depth of fitness wasn't there - but that doesn't matter for your target events.

    The main thing though if you're really serious about TT results, focus on aerodynamics, not fitness for most of it, you'll get way more bang for your time.
     
  3. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    What are the courses like?
     
  4. gregkeller

    gregkeller New Member

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    For the most part courses are flat, out and backs. There is one hill climb (i'm in trouble), a few that are more rolling, and one hilly circuit that they don't allow TT bikes for. It's a nice series, and i'm not talking myself into believing that i've got a shot to win the overall, but I think with a solid dose of L4 and VO2 work I can get in decent shape to do alright, maybe
     
  5. RapDaddyo

    RapDaddyo Active Member

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    In that case, there's little incentive to work on your anaerobic work capacity. So, I agree that a steady dose of L4/L5 is about right. Of course, trainer rides are likely to be the most efficient use of your limited time. It's not too difficult to do 75% L4 as a percentage of time on the bike and close to 50% L5. I find it much more difficult to hit those percentages on the road. And, you can do all or most of your time on a trainer in the TT position. Harder to do that on the road, depending on your training routes.
     
  6. JibberJim

    JibberJim Member

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    Here in the UK time trialling is possibly even more competitive than road racing (in a 10 mile TT today, you needed to beat 30mph average just to come in the top 86...) and there are lots of folk who train almost all the time on the turbo outside races and don't do more than 8 hours a week.

    "Tops" (who wrote http://www.amazon.co.uk/Time-Trialling-Fly-Through-Pain-Barrier-ebook/dp/B009YL5JVG ) on his experiences claims 6-9 hours a week of training purely on the turbo, and he was doing very well in 12 hour events let alone short ones, there are lots of others doing similar. Other top guys spend almost all their time on the turbo outside aero testing - which is also extremely important.
     
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