Timex GPS



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Jac

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Anyone familiar with this. I ran a 20 miler with a guy on the NCR trail outside of Baltimore on
Saturday, and it was amazingly accurate. I know some of you use GPSs that have map features, etc,
but i would use the Timex for both running and benting. Anyone know of a similar device which
transmits the information to a watch?

Thanks John Clarke
 
S

Seth Jayson

Guest
There are bike computers that transmit the information to a watch. There are also cool ones that
store and graph your speed, etc. (The Brain, I think, specialized?) A google search on appropriate
keywords will get you started.

I've used the Timex GPS watch and it's a decent unit, but here's my take:

It's about as big as a Garmin Etrex. It weighs about the same. The only thing it does that an Etrex
doesn't is give you a pace readout in
min/mile (although maybe you can get an etrex to do this, and for biking, you want mph or
kmph anyway)

It doesn't: map, locate, or do any of the other useful stuff a real GPS unit does, so I think you're
much better off getting a comparably-sized GPS unit. Also, the armband is the only way to secure it
to yourself/bike short of rigging something else, whereas I have seen some nicely-mounted GPS units
on handlebars.
 
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John Riley

Guest
I like the idea of something that would measure distance, regardless of which bike I was on, and
would also work for walking. I don't especially need it to read to a watch, though. I don't know if
I would be able to master the complexity of the mapping function on the Garmin, so I don't know if I
would use it.

Are they comparable in terms of battery life?

JohnRiley1 (at) rogers.com
 
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John Riley

Guest
[email protected] (john riley) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I like the idea of something that would measure distance, regardless of which bike I was on, and
> would also work for walking. I don't especially need it to read to a watch, though. I don't know
> if I would be able to master the complexity of the mapping function on the Garmin, so I don't know
> if I would use it.
>
> Are they comparable in terms of battery life?
>
> JohnRiley1 (at) rogers.com

I see they are not. Twelve hours on the Timex GPS and 18 hours on the Garmin. Also looks like the
Timex _is_ a Garmin inside.

JR
 
S

Seth Jayson

Guest
The regular GPS units also measures distances. As for mapping, it's no more complicated than
pressing a button and walking. You need only use the features you want. Like I said, I see no point
in spending a comparable amount of money on a unit that's the same size, but does much much less.

> I like the idea of something that would measure distance, regardless of which bike I was on, and
> would also work for walking. I
 
J

John Ruggiero

Guest
I'm new to bents (I'm buying one this week) but have used a Garmin eTrex Vista for years on hikes,
geocaching, mtn bikes, road bikes, and wind-powered vehicles. The main objection to getting a gps
with moving-map display is the cost. There are garmins from $100- up to the Vista at $350-. I can't
believe the Timex would be less than the cost of a low-end gps.

With a garmin and some $20 software (AAA MAP and Go for example) you can sit your handy laptop on
your passenger's lap and have a moving-map that is actually big enough to be useful.

Also, realize that we are at war now and gps signals may not be as accurate as the display leads you
to believe. From what I hear, the signal may be distorted significantly (miles off).

-john

"Seth Jayson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> The regular GPS units also measures distances. As for mapping, it's no more complicated than
> pressing a button and walking. You need only use the features you want. Like I said, I see no
> point in spending a comparable amount of money on a unit that's the same size, but does much
> much less.
>
>
> > I like the idea of something that would measure distance, regardless of which bike I was on, and
> > would also work for walking. I
 
S

Seth Jayson

Guest
Not true.

> Also, realize that we are at war now and gps signals may not be as accurate as the display leads
> you to believe. From what I hear, the signal may be distorted significantly (miles off).
 
C

Carl

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"John Ruggiero" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Also, realize that we are at war now and gps signals may not be as accurate as the display leads
> you to believe. From what I hear, the signal may be distorted significantly (miles off).

The selective distortion has never been that far off. I just loaded the track from last night's
ride, and it laid right over the streets perfectly, so accuracy is still fine.

-Carl
 
J

John Riley

Guest
"John Ruggiero" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> I'm new to bents (I'm buying one this week) but have used a Garmin eTrex Vista for years on hikes,
> geocaching, mtn bikes, road bikes, and wind-powered vehicles. [...]

Can one buy a bike holder, or do you have to make these?

JohnRiley1 (at) rogers.com
 
K

Ken Kobayashi

Guest
On 23 Apr 2003 14:09:26 -0700, [email protected] (Seth Jayson) wrote:

>> Can one buy a bike holder, or do you have to make these?
>>
>Look heah: http://shop.garmin.com/accessory.jsp?sku=010%2D10267%2D00

Also look at the RAM mount (http://www.ram-mount.com/). The Garmin mount probably works fine for
upright bikes, but for our non-standard bikes the RAM mount allows far more freedom in mounting
position and angle.

Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
 
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