tiny gripe about boredom, etc.

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Good news: after keeping it up for a few months, my endurance has got
    better and I can swim up to an hour at a reasonable pace with only 1
    quick break. Bad news: I usually cop out after 45 min even though I can
    go longer, because before I get too tired, I get too bored going back
    and forth the lane! Not even the extra challenge of negotiating
    obstacles (pregnant women, beer-bellied men, etc.) on Sunday morning
    sessions seems to do the trick. I guess the solution is to pick up my
    pace, if I want to burn more energy? A bit easier said than done but
    I'll try.
    Which brings me to another point: is (standard amateur) swimming not
    really energy intensive? Yesterday I decided to jog home from the
    municipal pool as it was closed when I got there and I wanted to get
    exercise of some sort. In 5 min of jogging, I felt as out of breath as
    nearly 30 min of swimming!

    Seb
     
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  2. Martin Smith

    Martin Smith Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Good news: after keeping it up for a few months, my endurance has got
    > better and I can swim up to an hour at a reasonable pace with only 1
    > quick break. Bad news: I usually cop out after 45 min even though I can
    > go longer, because before I get too tired, I get too bored going back
    > and forth the lane! Not even the extra challenge of negotiating
    > obstacles (pregnant women, beer-bellied men, etc.) on Sunday morning
    > sessions seems to do the trick. I guess the solution is to pick up my
    > pace, if I want to burn more energy? A bit easier said than done but
    > I'll try.


    A better solution would be to join a masters team.

    > Which brings me to another point: is (standard amateur) swimming not
    > really energy intensive? Yesterday I decided to jog home from the
    > municipal pool as it was closed when I got there and I wanted to get
    > exercise of some sort. In 5 min of jogging, I felt as out of breath as
    > nearly 30 min of swimming!
    >
    > Seb


    Swimming is energy intensive, but you've gotten efficient at your
    standard swim, so you have to work harder to get as tired as you used
    to. The same thing will happen with jogging if you jog regularly, but
    they are different sports, so they require different training. Swimming
    doesn't train you for running, nor does running train you for swimming.
     
  3. [snip]
    > > Which brings me to another point: is (standard amateur) swimming not
    > > really energy intensive? Yesterday I decided to jog home from the
    > > municipal pool as it was closed when I got there and I wanted to get
    > > exercise of some sort. In 5 min of jogging, I felt as out of breath as
    > > nearly 30 min of swimming!
    > >
    > > Seb

    >
    > Swimming is energy intensive, but you've gotten efficient at your
    > standard swim, so you have to work harder to get as tired as you used
    > to. The same thing will happen with jogging if you jog regularly, but
    > they are different sports, so they require different training. Swimming
    > doesn't train you for running, nor does running train you for swimming.


    Hmm, it could just be I'm still not swimming that energetically, I'm
    mostly comparing myself to the 'Sunday dippers'. Anyway, I kinda hoped
    that with all that swimming I'd have better breathing and circulation
    which should have helped me jogging. I guess they are quite different
    then.

    Seb
     
  4. Guest

    On 9 Apr,
    [email protected] wrote:


    > Hmm, it could just be I'm still not swimming that energetically, I'm
    > mostly comparing myself to the 'Sunday dippers'. Anyway, I kinda hoped
    > that with all that swimming I'd have better breathing and circulation
    > which should have helped me jogging. I guess they are quite different
    > then.


    I gave up running (temporarily, I hope) a couple of years ago due to a knee
    injury. My aerobic fitness (for swimming) has vastly declined. You do get
    some cross training benefit, but I find more the other way round. Running
    utilises bigger muscles in the legs, so exercises the cardiovascular system
    more thoroughly.



    --
    BD
    Change lycos to yahoo to reply
     
  5. Martin Smith

    Martin Smith Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > [snip]
    >
    >>>Which brings me to another point: is (standard amateur) swimming not
    >>>really energy intensive? Yesterday I decided to jog home from the
    >>>municipal pool as it was closed when I got there and I wanted to get
    >>>exercise of some sort. In 5 min of jogging, I felt as out of breath as
    >>>nearly 30 min of swimming!
    >>>
    >>>Seb

    >>
    >>Swimming is energy intensive, but you've gotten efficient at your
    >>standard swim, so you have to work harder to get as tired as you used
    >>to. The same thing will happen with jogging if you jog regularly, but
    >>they are different sports, so they require different training. Swimming
    >>doesn't train you for running, nor does running train you for swimming.

    >
    >
    > Hmm, it could just be I'm still not swimming that energetically, I'm
    > mostly comparing myself to the 'Sunday dippers'. Anyway, I kinda hoped
    > that with all that swimming I'd have better breathing and circulation
    > which should have helped me jogging. I guess they are quite different
    > then.


    Your better breathing and circulation *will* help you jogging -- if you
    keep jogging. But those big jogging muscles, not used in swimming to
    support your weight, are out of shape.
     
  6. I guess I know that I gotta do... jog to the pool for my swim and jog
    back! Barely 5 min either way, but better than nothing :)

    Seb
     
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