Tips for all us aspiring wheel builders



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M

Michael Dart

Guest
"Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> This site has some the best advice I've seen anywhere. Of course we
should
> still read a good book like The Bicycle Wheel, but this guy has some great tips.
> http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#WTQ1
>
> Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.
> --
> Slacker
>
>

Good stuff. True, you don't need all the truing stands and stuff. But having a nice truing stand is
a luxury and makes it easy to get comfortable at a table rather than sitting on the floor by your
upsidedown bike. As he said bringing the spokes to tension and truing wheels requires patience and
patience comes easier for me if I am comfortable.

See if you can find a 'Spokey' spoke wrench. I initially overlooked these as being "too much plastic
must be ****.. Ah...ah...death to you!" but found they grip the spoke on three corners and won't
round them off like other wrenchs can. I used one of those Park 3 way wrenches on my first wheels
and boy my thumb wasn't happy.

Speed tip: always leave the nipples square to the rim when tensioning. The spoke wrench will fall on
each the same way making for less fumbling around.

Also the instructions found in Zinn and the Art of Mountian Bike Maintenance are very easy to follow
for lacing up the spokes.

Mike - Always buy your wheelbuilder beer!
 
G

G.T.

Guest
Slacker wrote:
> This site has some the best advice I've seen anywhere. Of course we should still read a good book
> like The Bicycle Wheel, but this guy has some great tips.
> http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#WTQ1
>
> Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.

I just use Sheldon's tips:

www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

Much easier to read and it doesn't teach you myth and legend, e.g. tying and soldering spokes.

Greg
--
"Destroy your safe and happy lives before it is too late, the battles we fought were long and hard,
just not to be consumed by rock n' roll..." - The Mekons
 
C

Clydesdalemtb

Guest
Slacker wrote:

> Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.

I am by _no_means_ an "expert"..... Sure, I've read a few books and websites, and built a few dozen
wheels, but I am certainly NOT an expert.
 
B

Bill Wheeler

Guest
On Sun, 01 Dec 2002 23:20:47 GMT, "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote:

>This site has some the best advice I've seen anywhere. Of course we should still read a good book
>like The Bicycle Wheel, but this guy has some great tips.
>http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#WTQ1
>
>Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.
Thanks for the link.

Peace, Bill The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a reflector, that is, the mind
should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of the world.
:-]
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
"Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote:

>This site has some the best advice I've seen anywhere. Of course we should still read a good book
>like The Bicycle Wheel, but this guy has some great tips.
>http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#WTQ1
>
>Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.

One of my favorite aids to building wheels is to lace the wheel, then mark the outside of each spoke
with a black felt-tip marker. Now you can tell how much spoke windup you are dealing with, and
correct for it ever time. It's nice to ride a new pair of wheels without all those *pings* that tell
you your wheel's not quite as true as it was.

Above all else, don't forget to stress relieve the wheels. This will keep your spokes healthy and
happy for many, many miles to come.

Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > This site has some the best advice I've seen anywhere. Of course we
> should
> > still read a good book like The Bicycle Wheel, but this guy has some
great
> > tips. http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/faq.htm#WTQ1
> >
> > Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.
> > --
> > Slacker
> >
> >
>
> Good stuff. True, you don't need all the truing stands and stuff. But having a nice truing stand
> is a luxury and makes it easy to get
comfortable
> at a table rather than sitting on the floor by your upsidedown bike. As
he
> said bringing the spokes to tension and truing wheels requires patience
and
> patience comes easier for me if I am comfortable.
>
> See if you can find a 'Spokey' spoke wrench. I initially overlooked these as being "too much
> plastic must be ****.. Ah...ah...death to you!" but found they grip the spoke on three corners and
> won't round them off like other wrenchs can. I used one of those Park 3 way wrenches on my first
> wheels and boy my thumb wasn't happy.
>
> Speed tip: always leave the nipples square to the rim when tensioning. The spoke wrench will fall
> on each the same way making for less fumbling
around.
>
> Also the instructions found in Zinn and the Art of Mountian Bike
Maintenance
> are very easy to follow for lacing up the spokes.
>
> Mike - Always buy your wheelbuilder beer!

Ah, that was easy http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/tools-h-z.html#spokewrenches and cheap too!
Looks a lot more finger friendly then my Park....good call.
--
Slacker
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"ClydesdaleMTB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>
> Slacker wrote:
>
> > Perhaps our resident wheel expert, Clyde or ?, can verify the accuracy.
>
> I am by _no_means_ an "expert"..... Sure, I've read a few books and websites, and built a few
> dozen wheels, but I am certainly NOT an expert.

Well, you're close enough...at least most of the time.
--
Slacker
 
J

Jonathan Harris

Guest
Michael Dart wrote:

> Good stuff. True, you don't need all the truing stands and stuff. But having a nice truing stand
> is a luxury and makes it easy to get comfortable at a table rather than sitting on the floor by
> your upsidedown bike. As he said bringing the spokes to tension and truing wheels requires
> patience and patience comes easier for me if I am comfortable.
>
> See if you can find a 'Spokey' spoke wrench. I initially overlooked these as being "too much
> plastic must be ****.. Ah...ah...death to you!" but found they grip the spoke on three corners and
> won't round them off like other wrenchs can. I used one of those Park 3 way wrenches on my first
> wheels and boy my thumb wasn't happy.

Spokeys are good, but I'd recommend having one with the sides cut down. Having to take out and
remount the spoke key every half turn is annoying to say the least.

--
a.m-b FAQ: http://bombacommand.iwarp.com/ambfaq.htm

b.bmx FAQ: http://bombacommand.iwarp.com/bmx_faq.htm
 
R

Russell.Pinder

Guest
.
>
> I just use Sheldon's tips:
>
> www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html
>
> Much easier to read and it doesn't teach you myth and legend, e.g. tying and soldering spokes.
>
> Greg

Yep - me too excellent clear instructions which have resulted in every wheel I've built so far (all
4 of them) being at least as good as any I've ever bought and better than most.

Russ
 
D

David Kunz

Guest
Jonathan Harris wrote:
> Michael Dart wrote:
>
>> Good stuff. True, you don't need all the truing stands and stuff. But having a nice truing stand
>> is a luxury and makes it easy to get comfortable at a table rather than sitting on the floor by
>> your upsidedown bike. As he said bringing the spokes to tension and truing wheels requires
>> patience and patience comes easier for me if I am comfortable.
>>
>> See if you can find a 'Spokey' spoke wrench. I initially overlooked these as being "too much
>> plastic must be ****.. Ah...ah...death to you!" but found they grip the spoke on three corners
>> and won't round them off like other wrenchs can. I used one of those Park 3 way wrenches on my
>> first wheels and boy my thumb wasn't happy.
>
>
> Spokeys are good, but I'd recommend having one with the sides cut down. Having to take out and
> remount the spoke key every half turn is annoying to say the least.

I like my DT-Swiss. Holds to all sides of the nipple and has nice wings for easy turning. Looks like
a wind-up toy key :).

David Kunz
 
C

Clydesdalemtb

Guest
David Kunz wrote:
>
> I like my DT-Swiss.

I'd like one too but at $50.00 each... ummm nope.

> Holds to all sides of the nipple

so does the VAR

> and has nice wings

So does a Maxi-Pad

--
John G. Just jealous
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
"David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> I like my DT-Swiss. Holds to all sides of the nipple and has nice wings for easy turning. Looks
> like a wind-up toy key :).
>
> David Kunz
>

Yeah but $59 bucks! I'm the biggest tool junkie I know and have a hard time with that one.

Mike - Mmmmm....bike tools
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> > I like my DT-Swiss. Holds to all sides of the nipple and has nice wings for easy turning. Looks
> > like a wind-up toy key :).
> >
> > David Kunz
> >
>
> Yeah but $59 bucks! I'm the biggest tool junkie I know and have a hard
time
> with that one.
>
> Mike - Mmmmm....bike tools

I just assumed that was a typo....$59....they must be outta their mind!
--
Slacker
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> > I like my DT-Swiss. Holds to all sides of the nipple and has nice wings for easy turning. Looks
> > like a wind-up toy key :).
> >
> > David Kunz
> >
>
> Yeah but $59 bucks! I'm the biggest tool junkie I know and have a hard
time
> with that one.
>
> Mike - Mmmmm....bike tools

And Mike T's site recommends havin' two wrenches. When you drop one, you pop on the other so you
won't lose your place!

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/tools-h-z.html#spokewrenches

DTW
 
C

Clydesdalemtb

Guest
Slacker wrote:
> I just assumed that was a typo....$59....they must be outta their mind!

It is indeed a fine tool...If you are a pro, building wheels day in and day out, it is worth every
dollar. It is like comparing a Craftsman to Snap On (Mac).
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
"ClydesdaleMTB" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>
> Slacker wrote:
> > I just assumed that was a typo....$59....they must be outta their mind!
>
> It is indeed a fine tool...If you are a pro, building wheels day in and day out, it is worth every
> dollar. It is like comparing a Craftsman to Snap On (Mac).
>

Tis true. I'm with you on the VAR tool though, nice compromise between the two. Though if you're a
weight weenie the Spokey is very light to carry on rides.

Mike - The DT would go very nice with the TS-3 Master Truing Stand. mmmmm.
 
D

David Kunz

Guest
Michael Dart wrote:
> "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
>>I like my DT-Swiss. Holds to all sides of the nipple and has nice wings for easy turning. Looks
>>like a wind-up toy key :).
>>
>>David Kunz
>>
>
>
> Yeah but $59 bucks! I'm the biggest tool junkie I know and have a hard time with that one.
>
> Mike - Mmmmm....bike tools

My LBS bought an extra and sold it to me for $20.00. I didn't realize I was getting such a
good deal :).

David Kunz
 
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