Tips for riding with a trailer

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by LSMike, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school, and
    wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the principle
    of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.
     
    Tags:


  2. On 20 Jan 2005 05:10:51 -0800, "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school, and
    >wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the principle
    >of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.


    Never used one. But in a similar principle to child seats, remember
    that the child will not be exercising and will therefore not generate
    much heat.

    --
    Amazon: "If you are interested in 'Asimov's I-Robot',
    you may also be interested in 'Garfield - The Movie'.
    ... erm, how do they figure that one out?
     
  3. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    LSMike wrote:
    >
    > I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school, and
    > wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the principle
    > of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.


    Not much else really - you should find it pretty easy as motorists will
    give you a much wider berth.
    Its obvious really, but make sure toddler is strapped in and can't throw
    teddy out (it makes a good game.
    Also on't have the front open while riding as all manner of nasties can
    be thrown up by your back wheel. A mudguard is highly advisable, and I'd
    also suggest you attach a good long flap to it.
    Enjoy - people will wave, so wave back :)

    And when you get to school everyone else will look at it with envy.
    "I wanna ride" - and that's just from the other parents.

    John B
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>,
    LSMike ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school,
    > and wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the
    > principle of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.


    I haven't trailered kids, just luggage, but I used to do that a lot. And
    the main tip I could offer is don't try taking corners really really
    fast. Also, balancing the rig while getting on and off can be more
    complex than with an ordinary bike.

    But apart from care when mounting, dismounting and cornering /fast/, no
    problems.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; MS Windows: A thirty-two bit extension ... to a sixteen bit
    ;; patch to an eight bit operating system originally coded for a
    ;; four bit microprocessor and sold by a two-bit company that
    ;; can't stand one bit of competition -- anonymous
     
  5. LSMike wrote:
    > I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school, and
    > wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the principle
    > of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.


    Ignore all the warnings that come with it. My one came with stickers
    saying something along the lines of "do not use in traffic", "wear a
    helmet and seatbelt", "do not corner above 5mph" etc.

    I forgot that I was towing it once and took a corner at the bottom of a
    hill v.v. fast. No problems.
     
  6. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 14:33:06 +0000 someone who may be JohnB
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >Also on't have the front open while riding as all manner of nasties can
    >be thrown up by your back wheel. A mudguard is highly advisable, and I'd
    >also suggest you attach a good long flap to it.


    In the summer the net will keep most things out, apart from the fine
    powder found on many Sustrans paths and where cattle use the road.
    Also riding through wet patches in summer will throw water onto the
    occupant. All of this may put them off, so the plastic cover needs
    to be deployed when necessary.

    Think of where the trailer wheels will go and try to avoid sudden
    bumps, as the occupant will probably not be able to prepare for
    them. While it is difficult to turn a child trailer over, single
    child trailers are more susceptible to this.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  7. Andy Morris

    Andy Morris Guest

    LSMike wrote:
    > I've recently started trailering my toddler to/from nursery school,
    > and wondered if any regulars have some tips above and beyond the
    > principle of BIG and of course Cyclecraft.


    A bit different, but while we're on the subject.

    I've just started taking my youngest (6 yo) to school with a trailer bike my
    lessons learnt would include:

    Fit mudguards to you bike and the trailer bike, include a crud catcher on
    the
    trailer downtube or a very long flap on the rear of you bike.

    Get (you and your passenger) used to the wobble on quite roads first.

    Go into corners much slower, you cant chuck it around.

    Even when riding it without a passenger, think twice before overtaking slow
    or stationary traffic, you need a larger gap to get back into and have less
    acceleration.

    Always carry waterproofs and a hat for your passenger, they get cold and
    desponendent vary quickly when went.

    Its a real gas init?

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/


    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 20/1/05 10:43 pm, in article [email protected],
    "David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 20 Jan 2005 14:33:06 +0000 someone who may be JohnB
    > <[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    >> Also on't have the front open while riding as all manner of nasties can
    >> be thrown up by your back wheel. A mudguard is highly advisable, and I'd
    >> also suggest you attach a good long flap to it.

    >
    > In the summer the net will keep most things out, apart from the fine
    > powder found on many Sustrans paths and where cattle use the road.
    > Also riding through wet patches in summer will throw water onto the
    > occupant. All of this may put them off, so the plastic cover needs
    > to be deployed when necessary.


    Absolutely, but in the summer the plastic cover can act as a greenhouse.. Do
    stop and check the occupants fairly frequently, especially those who are
    less able to communicate.

    > Think of where the trailer wheels will go and try to avoid sudden
    > bumps, as the occupant will probably not be able to prepare for
    > them. While it is difficult to turn a child trailer over, single
    > child trailers are more susceptible to this.
    >


    In my experience (Winther Dolphin tractor driver for seven years), a good
    trailer will be very difficult to turn over accidentally on a flat road. You
    will need to hit a bump or some such.

    1. Stability. I find the trailer aids bike stability. When riding up hill
    and being overtaken by asthmatic joggers, I found balance was fine until the
    front wheel started lifting off..

    2. Wheel tracking. Do watch where the wheels go and know how wide it is. I
    tried to get through some gates/kerbs where the trailer was marginally wider
    than the gap.

    3. Suspension. For vvery young children you may want to run the trailer
    tyres at reduced pressure to make a softer ride. Even the paint on double
    yellow lines can provide enough vibration to upset a cranky rugrat. AS they
    get older you can pump the tyres up harder.

    4. Keep out a bit further than normal, you need to keep the tyre clearance
    from the kerb. Cars will leave you space.

    5. You cannot bunnyhop a bike/trailer combo.

    6. If you are doing the shopping, put the weight over the axle. (good
    principle anyway for weight carrying). Don't leave anything that can be
    opened (bread, sticky buns, fruit, yoghurt etc) within reach of the
    passenger.

    7. You may want sun shades for the summer. I made little popper on curtains
    for my trailer and they were very useful.

    Have fun.

    ...d
     
Loading...
Loading...