Tips on Cleaning glue from Tubular Tyres ?



shorty

New Member
Apr 5, 2004
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Hi. I made a bit of a mess of my tyres when putting on my tubs the other day.

Have cleaned the rims and braking surface nicely with acetone. It explicitley said keep acetone away from tyres so not sure what to use on the tyres (bear in mind the rims are carbon so though ill be careful - there may be some overlap)

thanks
 
shorty said:
Hi. I made a bit of a mess of my tyres when putting on my tubs the other day.

Have cleaned the rims and braking surface nicely with acetone. It explicitley said keep acetone away from tyres so not sure what to use on the tyres (bear in mind the rims are carbon so though ill be careful - there may be some overlap)

thanks
Try applying ICE (in a plastic bag) to the excess glue ... the object is to HARDEN the glue by freezing it ... essentially, temporary simulated aging of the glue.

Use a cheap/disposable plastic spoon-or-knife (or, equivalent ... if you press too hard, the tool will sacrifice itself rather than impaling you or the tyre) that you would get at a fast food restaurant to pry the HARDENED GLUE from the tyre casing ...

This will probably be a mind-numbingly tedious process ...

For non-Crit use, you don't need that much glue, IMO, with a NEW (but, previously stretched) tyre ... I can definitely glue up two wheels & tyres with one tube of glue. Apparently, some people use two tubes of glue per wheel!
 
alfeng said:
Try applying ICE (in a plastic bag) to the excess glue ... the object is to HARDEN the glue by freezing it ... essentially, temporary simulated aging of the glue.

Use a cheap/disposable plastic spoon-or-knife (or, equivalent ... if you press too hard, the tool will sacrifice itself rather than impaling you or the tyre) that you would get at a fast food restaurant to pry the HARDENED GLUE from the tyre casing ...

This will probably be a mind-numbingly tedious process ...

For non-Crit use, you don't need that much glue, IMO, with a NEW (but, previously stretched) tyre ... I can definitely glue up two wheels & tyres with one tube of glue. Apparently, some people use two tubes of glue per wheel!

Yeah, thanks. I have been picking off what I can with my nails. I probably went a bit overboard using about a tube a wheel. But they are for crit use and pretty rough roads.

The tyres were stretched but still super tight. My friend wiho helped me put them on used to use Tubs alot and reckons he never had as much trouble in the past.
 
shorty said:
Yeah, thanks. I have been picking off what I can with my nails. I probably went a bit overboard using about a tube a wheel. But they are for crit use and pretty rough roads.

The tyres were stretched but still super tight. My friend wiho helped me put them on used to use Tubs alot and reckons he never had as much trouble in the past.
Deciding how LITTLE glue you need becomes as much a balancing act as an act of faith ...

I noticed that a pre-stretched, DRY (prior to gluing) tyre is almost impossible to roll of the rim even if there isn't any air in it -- lean on the wheel (or, bike with the dry mounted BUT uninflated tyres) at varying angles & observe that the tire isn't coming off. Roll the wheel/bike a bit while leaning it, and it still doesn't want to come off. Do it with dry mounted BUT inflated tyres and the tyres are not going to roll off the rim. Now, what happens during a turn at over 20MPH with a flat/blown tyre might be a bit different, so it definitely becomes an act of faith as to how much glue you need to keep them on the rim.

Anyway, I subsequently used less-and-less glue on the tyre so that the glue (for "recreational" riding, mind you) is only applied to keep the tyre from rotating on the rim ... just a dab of glue between each spoke hole (okay, these are older 36h wheels)!

Less glue ALSO should mean slightly better heat dissipation ... at least, that's my justification for frugality.

BTW. I'm thinking you didn't let the tyres rest long enough on your spare rims before gluing them ... give them a few days, or more, inflated to about 25PSI on your "spare" rims the next time.

You should probably have one-or-two SPARE pairs of tyres that have ben pre-stretched before your racing season begins in earnest! Definitely (for road racing/riding), your spare should be pre-stretched -- other than a tacoed wheel, I presume that there are few things that could be worse than trying to put an unstretched tyre on when you are on the side of the road.

FWIW. Generally, I don't think acetone is a good idea for future cleaning ... when the time comes to clean my rims (and, this doesn't happen too often in light of the miniscule amount of glue I use), I EITHER use paint thinner OR preferably vegetable oil-or-shortening followed by dishwashing soap & water. The latter is a MUCH SLOWER but non-toxic ... the vegetable oil/shortening will eventually soften the glue to a gummy sludge that you can wash off. With carbon rims, I would check with the manufacturer to find out what their recommendation is for cleaning the rims.
 
alfeng said:
Deciding how LITTLE glue you need becomes as much a balancing act as an act of faith ...

I noticed that a pre-stretched, DRY (prior to gluing) tyre is almost impossible to roll of the rim even if there isn't any air in it -- lean on the wheel (or, bike with the dry mounted BUT uninflated tyres) at varying angles & observe that the tire isn't coming off. Roll the wheel/bike a bit while leaning it, and it still doesn't want to come off. Do it with dry mounted BUT inflated tyres and the tyres are not going to roll off the rim. Now, what happens during a turn at over 20MPH with a flat/blown tyre might be a bit different, so it definitely becomes an act of faith as to how much glue you need to keep them on the rim.

Anyway, I subsequently used less-and-less glue on the tyre so that the glue (for "recreational" riding, mind you) is only applied to keep the tyre from rotating on the rim ... just a dab of glue between each spoke hole (okay, these are older 36h wheels)!

Less glue ALSO should mean slightly better heat dissipation ... at least, that's my justification for frugality.

BTW. I'm thinking you didn't let the tyres rest long enough on your spare rims before gluing them ... give them a few days, or more, inflated to about 25PSI on your "spare" rims the next time.

You should probably have one-or-two SPARE pairs of tyres that have ben pre-stretched before your racing season begins in earnest! Definitely (for road racing/riding), your spare should be pre-stretched -- other than a tacoed wheel, I presume that there are few things that could be worse than trying to put an unstretched tyre on when you are on the side of the road.

FWIW. Generally, I don't think acetone is a good idea for future cleaning ... when the time comes to clean my rims (and, this doesn't happen too often in light of the miniscule amount of glue I use), I EITHER use paint thinner OR preferably vegetable oil-or-shortening followed by dishwashing soap & water. The latter is a MUCH SLOWER but non-toxic ... the vegetable oil/shortening will eventually soften the glue to a gummy sludge that you can wash off. With carbon rims, I would check with the manufacturer to find out what their recommendation is for cleaning the rims.

Yes. Im hearing you. I had made the observations of how tight these things are even on dry rims. But then that image of Beloki was running thru my head !! Anyway, Suspect when I try and get the pesky things off ill realise why I didnt need to use as much as I did.

It was my first time (so erring on caution) and I followed manufturers guide and a couple of notes on the web, incidently - the manufacturer suggested the Acetone for the rims in the manual.

It has been suggested I try Eucalyptus oil on the tyres - soap and water should then remove any greasy residue.

I have a spare set of tyres stretching. Vittorias. They were a heck of alot easier to get on the dry rim than the Contis that I struggled with so hopefully that means that they will be easier and less messy to get on the race wheels.

thanks for your help.
 
shorty said:
Yes. Im hearing you. I had made the observations of how tight these things are even on dry rims. But then that image of Beloki was running thru my head !! Anyway, Suspect when I try and get the pesky things off ill realise why I didnt need to use as much as I did.

It was my first time (so erring on caution) and I followed manufturers guide and a couple of notes on the web, incidently - the manufacturer suggested the Acetone for the rims in the manual.

It has been suggested I try Eucalyptus oil on the tyres - soap and water should then remove any greasy residue.

I have a spare set of tyres stretching. Vittorias. They were a heck of alot easier to get on the dry rim than the Contis that I struggled with so hopefully that means that they will be easier and less messy to get on the race wheels.

thanks for your help.

I use White Lightning's Metal Prep spray to clean the rims and a bit of the tires after gluing, but I don't worry so much about the tires. I don't get too much on the tires, but even if I do, it only takes a ride or two before the glue on the tires gets so dirty that you don't see it. I definitely don't see it when riding.

Metal Prep is nice in that it doesn't leave a residue.
 
Tim Lamkin said:
Try Tufo Ext Tape....works wonderfull and is safe
for the glue on the tire, I use a tiny bit of De-Solv-It, which is a citrus oil based adhesive remover.

http://www.dtep.com/de-solv-it.htm

+1 on the Tufo Extreme tape

Just put on some Continental Competition tubs using the extreme tape on my Reynolds MV 32 T rims, all up took about 5 minutes from unrolling the tape to pumping up the tire. Just follow the instructional video on the Tufo website. Tire is easier to seat, as you position it before removing the protective tape and creating the bond.

The vid is at the bottom of the page.
http://www.tufo.com/index.php?lg=en&co=instrukce#Instr4

To take off you just roll the tire off a little bit on one side of the rim and then the other side, the tire comes off easily, the tape is reuseable , if not too much of the cotton strands from the tire base tape adheres to it. The tapes comes of the rims easily if you strip it slowly and there is no glue residue left on the rim or the tire base tape. The rim is like new after you take the tape off. While the tire is in place its a strong safe bond.

For reference Reynolds Composite approves using it with their carbon wheels.

http://www.reynoldscomposites.com/in...p?p_matter=faq
The answer is about half way down

I can't really notice any performance difference to gluing except for less mess and glue where its not supposed to be , I haven't had a tire roll off the rim yet with either method
 
...and the trick there is to ALSO get just enough not to roll the tire off in a hard corner, Try the Tufo Ext tape....Too easy and very safe, they know the correct amount.


Start to finish 10 minutes, I let them sit over night, I know some don't...however I do.