tire cuts



hughes

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
16
0
0
75
Does anyone know of some bonding agent that will stick to tire tread ? I can't find anything that will glue cuts together or fill cuts and adhere to the rubber. Hughes
 

Don Shipp

New Member
May 20, 2005
1,007
0
0
64
hughes said:
Does anyone know of some bonding agent that will stick to tire tread ? I can't find anything that will glue cuts together or fill cuts and adhere to the rubber. Hughes
Superglue.
 

Trainingwheelz

New Member
Sep 16, 2005
35
0
0
Used carb gell packets used on the underside between tire and tube serve as a nice inner patch/reinforcer.Never heard of anyone filling in cuts though..

Ian
 

hughes

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
16
0
0
75
Trainingwheelz said:
Used carb gell packets used on the underside between tire and tube serve as a nice inner patch/reinforcer.Never heard of anyone filling in cuts though..

Ian
Ian, I've always refurred to an inner patch as a boot. I'm talking about a large cut of the tread on the outside , either cutting thru the casing or not . John
 

domaindomain

New Member
Dec 20, 2004
383
0
0
I would say get a new tire. If its bad enough to have you thinking about glue and the like, it warrants replacing.

Think about your own safety and the inconvenience of the tyre failing again at the worst time possible.

Then weigh that up against the few £s for a new tyre....

Put the cut one on your turbo trainer bike if you have one, at least you'll get a bit more wear out of it that way
 

Trainingwheelz

New Member
Sep 16, 2005
35
0
0
I realize now that you may be talking about a mtn. bike tire and see as how I did not have this in mind during my previous post, I thought that filling in a cut would be more detrimental to the ride in that it may cause rolling problems. But, if the fix is on a mtn. bike tire, I will endorse ShooGoo!

Ian
 

hughes

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
16
0
0
75
Trainingwheelz said:
I realize now that you may be talking about a mtn. bike tire and see as how I did not have this in mind during my previous post, I thought that filling in a cut would be more detrimental to the ride in that it may cause rolling problems. But, if the fix is on a mtn. bike tire, I will endorse ShooGoo!

Ian
Ian, You were right the first time it is a road bike tire. There are alot of broken beer bottles in Texas, and I can't afford to replace a tire every time I get a bad cut. I have developed a very good booting system using ripstop nylon and contact cement. I just used the Shoegoo and I think it's going to work good. After booting and filling I sand down the cut flush and it rides lik new. John
 

dhk

New Member
Sep 1, 2003
2,259
0
0
74
hughes said:
Thanks, the Shoegoo works good.
Have you tried different tires? What about pressures? I've had a problem with cuts on Michelin Pro Race, but found that GP 3000's are a lot tougher.

Have found that running at max rated pressures seems to make tires more prone to cuts and flats. Believe this is because with max allowable pressure, the harder tire is less conforming to sharp objects on the road. Also, the casing of the tire is under more tension, so that it's easier to slice through it.
 

Doctor Morbius

New Member
Mar 15, 2004
1,792
2
0
domaindomain said:
I would say get a new tire. If its bad enough to have you thinking about glue and the like, it warrants replacing.

Think about your own safety and the inconvenience of the tyre failing again at the worst time possible.

Then weigh that up against the few £s for a new tyre....

Put the cut one on your turbo trainer bike if you have one, at least you'll get a bit more wear out of it that way
That's exactly what I do with cut or worn tires. It's not worth the risk of getting a flat at an inopportune time, IMO. Tires can be had cheap if one buys in bulk. Even decent tires if one is willing to look for sales and buy before they are needed.
 

Weisse Luft

New Member
May 28, 2004
1,306
0
0
Doctor Morbius said:
That's exactly what I do with cut or worn tires. It's not worth the risk of getting a flat at an inopportune time, IMO. Tires can be had cheap if one buys in bulk. Even decent tires if one is willing to look for sales and buy before they are needed.
Shoe Goo. Clean the cut well, it will be dirty which will prevent adhesion. Booting the cut with a well-trimmed section of old tire casing is the only way to restore a cut tire.. Remove the tread rubber on the boot and glue it with contact cement to the inside of the tire.

Work a small amount into the cut with no pressure in the tube. If a knobby tire, fill the "negative space" with modeling clay. Wrap the tire with a few layers of strapping tape completely around the rim. Inflate to operating pressure and let set for a day. Remove tape (and clay) and the tire will be like new.
 

hughes

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
16
0
0
75
Doctor Morbius said:
That's exactly what I do with cut or worn tires. It's not worth the risk of getting a flat at an inopportune time, IMO. Tires can be had cheap if one buys in bulk. Even decent tires if one is willing to look for sales and buy before they are needed.
I've been booting tires,both clenchers and sewups for 30 years and have never had a failure at the boot. I can't bring myself to buy a new tire every time I get a bad cut,with bike tires costing almost as much as car tires. I ride both a single and on Sundays a tandem with my wife. I've booted tires on both bikes with no problems. The quality of the booting and application are crtical to success and longivity. How can bike tires cost as much as car tires? Are we getting hosed?
 

hughes

New Member
Jun 2, 2004
16
0
0
75
dhk said:
Have you tried different tires? What about pressures? I've had a problem with cuts on Michelin Pro Race, but found that GP 3000's are a lot tougher.

Have found that running at max rated pressures seems to make tires more prone to cuts and flats. Believe this is because with max allowable pressure, the harder tire is less conforming to sharp objects on the road. Also, the casing of the tire is under more tension, so that it's easier to slice through it.
You are probably right about pressure. I do ride close to max. pressure. I also ride light tires and small section [22]. I've always been willing to accept the down side of soch tires as long as I can repair them. My booting method and the ShoeGoo I think is the right solution. Thanks
 

Doctor Morbius

New Member
Mar 15, 2004
1,792
2
0
hughes said:
I've been booting tires,both clenchers and sewups for 30 years and have never had a failure at the boot. I can't bring myself to buy a new tire every time I get a bad cut,with bike tires costing almost as much as car tires. I ride both a single and on Sundays a tandem with my wife. I've booted tires on both bikes with no problems. The quality of the booting and application are crtical to success and longivity. How can bike tires cost as much as car tires? Are we getting hosed?
Good question. All of the tires I own were purchased on a closeout deal. I bought a bunch of Continental Ultra 2000's for $10 each at Nashbar when they had them on sale with a coupon. I bought about 15 of them. They're fine for training tires but a tad heavy for racing. For $10 each I can afford to toss them when they get cut. Fortunately, I don't get too many cuts. I can't bring myself to spend $45 on a bicycle tire but then I don't have any specialty needs.
 

el Ingles

New Member
Oct 3, 2003
730
0
0
66
dhk said:
Have you tried different tires? What about pressures? I've had a problem with cuts on Michelin Pro Race, but found that GP 3000's are a lot tougher.

Have found that running at max rated pressures seems to make tires more prone to cuts and flats. Believe this is because with max allowable pressure, the harder tire is less conforming to sharp objects on the road. Also, the casing of the tire is under more tension, so that it's easier to slice through it.

seen more cuts on michelin tyres than any other ¿ is it the silicon compounds they use ?