Tire liners vs slime

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by -, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.
    Thnx
     
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  2. [email protected] wrote:
    > I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are
    > sharp on the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the
    > snakeskins any better. Thnx


    Slime is messy and doesn't always work. Liners help. Thornproof tubes also
    help a lot. Kevlar-resistant tires help some, although in my experience
    they haven't. Using all at the same time should make you virtually
    impenetrable.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  3. On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 23:32:47 GMT, <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    >the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.


    I have experience with Slime. I use Mr. Tuffies a lot and love them.
    They do slow the bike a little.

    JT

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  4. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 23:32:47 GMT, <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    >the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.
    >Thnx
    >


    It depends on what type of tire, and where you will be riding it.

    I don't use any of it. Most of the time I do use a tire that is
    considered flat resistant. Either with a kevlar belt or in
    Continental's case "Duraskin".

    Give us some more details.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  5. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    > the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.
    > Thnx
    >
    >

    I use both in my off road bike. Those liners are tough. I've ridden
    through patches of cacti and have the needles sticking out the tire yet
    have not flatted.

    On my road bike which has neither, I flat regularly. Owell - the price
    for speed, I suppose.
     
  6. Guest

    I mainly cycle tour city streets, and light trails on a fully loaded self
    supported touring rig. I'm running conti TT's with tuffy liners, glass,
    metal chips, nails in the roads are common. Can tuffys become displaced and
    slice my tire? Decending down some hills at a high speed, and getting a
    flat could be a serious problem.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp

    on
    > the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any

    better.
    > Thnx
    >
    >
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:
    > I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    > the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.
    > Thnx
    >
    >

    I've been using the same pair of Mr. Tuffies for over ten years. The
    only flat I got while using them was when I accidentally folded over the
    end of one and it - sliced the tube. Oh and a pinch flat because I
    neglected proper inflation. I never had a properly installed Mr. Tuffy
    damage the tire.

    Kevlar? Good, but not like the Tuffies. Sharp glass still cuts trhough
    kevlar, but not easily through the thick Tuffy plastic.

    Combine both? That's my current setup - I never have flats.

    Sorry I can't vouch for Slime. I haven't needed to use it.

    -Collin
     
  8. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I mainly cycle tour city streets, and light trails on a fully loaded self
    > supported touring rig. I'm running conti TT's with tuffy liners, glass,
    > metal chips, nails in the roads are common. Can tuffys become displaced and
    > slice my tire? Decending down some hills at a high speed, and getting a
    > flat could be a serious problem.


    Tuffies very, very rarely cause flats. One theory, which I abide by
    when installing them, is that they only or primarily cause flats when
    their overlapping secion is oriented incorrectly relative to the
    wheel's rotation. The idea is that they should be oriented so that when
    you're looking at the bike from the left side, and the overlap is at
    the 9 o'clock position, that the downwards-pointing end of the tire
    liner will be on the outside, and that this will be gentler on the
    tube. It makes sense and I've seen some tire liner flats caused by
    having it oriented opposite, and none when it's oriented as described.
    The other thing is that rim strips shouldn't be cut, because that can
    also cause flats if the cut end contacts the tube.

    Basically, if you ride Tuffies, you still need to carry a spare tube.
    But you would need to even if there wasn't a question of them causing
    flats.
     
  9. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp
    > on
    > the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any
    > better.
    > Thnx
    >
    >

    Slime is OK, but due to the solvent they use in Slime or other stuff like
    Slime, you cannot patch the tube should it get a flat.
    The solvent causes the patch adhesive to dissolve over a period of time and
    the patch comes loose on you. Plus the solvent that oozes out at the hole,
    won't let the patch stick prperly either. I am amazed as to how many flats
    one can get even with Slime as the hole is too big for Slime to seal OK.
    When i was a kid on a kid's bike, Slime was the only thing to use and it
    worked OK up to a point, eventually you had to replace the tube and or tire,
    as you couldn't keep enough air in the tube to ride around the neighborhood
    even.

    I prefer using a good tire with kevlar or some other puncture resistant
    layer inside. The Tuffy liners are good if you don't have those kinds of
    tires. Good tubes are OK, but carry several spares and a patch kit etc.

    If you are in a heavy thorn are one of the solid tire/tube items may be the
    only way to go. There is also a company that makes solid tubes too, WalMart
    sometimes has them in MTB sizes too. But these tend to make the wheels
    heavier and that irks a lot of people, plus you lose some of the phuematic
    air cushion effect riding over bumps and such. But it is a tradeoff that is
    worth it in some cases.
    Here is one compnay http://www.airfreetires.com/
    Here is a airless tube compnay http://www.nomorflats.com/
     
  10. Guest

    Really good point Nate, I'll have to check the overlap on the liners
    something I never considered. A friend of mine crossed paths with a fellow
    touring around america - http://www.northamericacyclingexpedition.com/ He's
    running two tuffys in the rear tire he told him in that rear knobby tire
    with no flats, the the front one has no liner, and he's had six flats. I bet
    that rear wheel weighs a ton! Thank you for the tips everyone, I'm learning
    alot


    "Nate Knutson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > I mainly cycle tour city streets, and light trails on a fully loaded

    self
    > > supported touring rig. I'm running conti TT's with tuffy liners, glass,
    > > metal chips, nails in the roads are common. Can tuffys become displaced

    and
    > > slice my tire? Decending down some hills at a high speed, and getting a
    > > flat could be a serious problem.

    >
    > Tuffies very, very rarely cause flats. One theory, which I abide by
    > when installing them, is that they only or primarily cause flats when
    > their overlapping secion is oriented incorrectly relative to the
    > wheel's rotation. The idea is that they should be oriented so that when
    > you're looking at the bike from the left side, and the overlap is at
    > the 9 o'clock position, that the downwards-pointing end of the tire
    > liner will be on the outside, and that this will be gentler on the
    > tube. It makes sense and I've seen some tire liner flats caused by
    > having it oriented opposite, and none when it's oriented as described.
    > The other thing is that rim strips shouldn't be cut, because that can
    > also cause flats if the cut end contacts the tube.
    >
    > Basically, if you ride Tuffies, you still need to carry a spare tube.
    > But you would need to even if there wasn't a question of them causing
    > flats.
    >
     
  11. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 23:32:47 GMT, <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp on
    >the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any better.


    I have one bike with a stupidly difficult rim that makes removing a tire damn
    near impossible - it has a pre-slimed tube. Otherwise I wouldn't bother with any
    of that crap.

    Ron
     
  12. Keir

    Keir Guest


    >>I'm a newbe, whats most of you prefer. I heard the tuffy liners are sharp
    >>on
    >>the ends, and if they move can slice a tire. Are the snakeskins any
    >>better.


    RE: slime. note on slime, apparently only useful for casual riding.
    Off-roading and fast speeds not compatible, dunno why, just what i read
    (manufacturer recommendation)
     
  13. EdgeRider

    EdgeRider Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Really good point Nate, I'll have to check the overlap on the liners
    > something I never considered. A friend of mine crossed paths with a fellow
    > touring around america - http://www.northamericacyclingexpedition.com/ He's
    > running two tuffys in the rear tire he told him in that rear knobby tire
    > with no flats, the the front one has no liner, and he's had six flats. I bet
    > that rear wheel weighs a ton! Thank you for the tips everyone, I'm learning
    > alot


    Hi drehus27...I am that rider...I had two tuffies in my rear tire since
    Delaware on my current perimeter tour of the USA and Canada and have
    not had one flat since. The only problem I had was hitting a hole which
    had been dug out of the pavement to access a survey cap and my wheel
    got dinked and had to replace it. But it wound up giving me a bunch of
    spare spokes! I ride 700cx38's. I am a self-contained rider so I keep
    tabs on the toatl weight factor for my rig...total 70-75lbs with
    trailer included! It's capacity is 200lbs but I don't want to Beverly
    Hillbilly it on this ride! :) Heading to San Diego from Ft. Meyers, FL.
    Who was your friend? Maybe I will remember him. My email is on the
    site.
    Remember...Not wearing a helmet is NOT COOL...even on a motorcycle.
     
  14. liners brand the tubes at overlap-rotate and inspect
    slime tubes are terrific but only work when used with liners-captures
    the slime
    use 2 liners!!!
    slime tubes are repaired using superglue or NAPA cement-hang tube with
    hole up for 3-4 days then repair gently
    kevlar belts are de riguer-non kevlar belted tires are antiquo
    the liner will keep a tube in when the kevlar belt seperates and holes
    out from serious cuts
    i did all this and ran over a grassly median avoiding dirt from
    excavation-
    and ripped the sidewall with a buried broken bottle....
     
  15. Dave

    Dave Guest

    John met you in florida at the 50 mile marker, I think you took his picture.
    I ride with him touring during the summer. Cheers
    Dave

    "EdgeRider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Really good point Nate, I'll have to check the overlap on the liners
    > > something I never considered. A friend of mine crossed paths with a

    fellow
    > > touring around america - http://www.northamericacyclingexpedition.com/

    He's
    > > running two tuffys in the rear tire he told him in that rear knobby tire
    > > with no flats, the the front one has no liner, and he's had six flats. I

    bet
    > > that rear wheel weighs a ton! Thank you for the tips everyone, I'm

    learning
    > > alot

    >
    > Hi drehus27...I am that rider...I had two tuffies in my rear tire since
    > Delaware on my current perimeter tour of the USA and Canada and have
    > not had one flat since. The only problem I had was hitting a hole which
    > had been dug out of the pavement to access a survey cap and my wheel
    > got dinked and had to replace it. But it wound up giving me a bunch of
    > spare spokes! I ride 700cx38's. I am a self-contained rider so I keep
    > tabs on the toatl weight factor for my rig...total 70-75lbs with
    > trailer included! It's capacity is 200lbs but I don't want to Beverly
    > Hillbilly it on this ride! :) Heading to San Diego from Ft. Meyers, FL.
    > Who was your friend? Maybe I will remember him. My email is on the
    > site.
    > Remember...Not wearing a helmet is NOT COOL...even on a motorcycle.
    >
    >
     
  16. I am a wrench, I have seen tuffie strips cause about 10-15 flats in the
    years I've been changing flats. Every time I have changed a tire with
    a tuffie strip in it, the tuffie strip has been the cause of the flat,
    and normaly it's at the edge not at the end of the tuffie strip. Slime
    also causes flats, or rather it causes valve problems. The slime is
    suppost to work like your red blood cells do when you get a cut, small
    fibers in the slime will build up around the leak, causing it to stop
    leaking. The problem is those fibers get caught in your valve
    (schreader only) and prevent it from being able to seal. As for
    tuffies I don't belive that it would be a problem if any of those
    people had inflated a their tires more then once in there lives. A
    tire, tube, and rim are a very dynamic interface, in other words they
    move around, if you've ever seen a wheel with the valve pointing to a
    spoke on either side of it, that's why. As your tire losses air (all
    tires lose air that is natrual) your tire creaps around and often pulls
    the tube with it, that alone causes flats, insert a third object in
    there and now you have a serious chafing issue. All the flats I've
    seen from tuffie strips are not cuts so much as a chafe, ever rubbed a
    whole in a piece of paper with an eraser (I have real serious grammer
    and spelling issues, lmfao)? Well the same thing happens at the bottom
    of your wheel when you ride. The side wall of your tire compresses
    when it is under load. Use whatever you want to but I personally
    charge over twice the normal rate when I have to deal with a slime
    tube, and I flat out refuse to install tuffie strips. If you are
    worried about getting flats use thorn-proof tubes, they are 18 times
    thicker then normal tubes. Thorn-proof tubes are 4.5mm thick in the
    center under the tread, and normal tubes are .25mm thick, that's a HUGE
    diffrence. And you don't have to worry about getting slime in your
    eye, or on your shoes. One of my friends dropped off his bike for some
    brake work about 6 months after I talked him in to spending the extra
    $6 for thorn-proof tubes, and in front of him I picked out 3 pieces of
    glass and a wire from his rear tire, no flat. Other things you might
    want to think about, riding in the gutter is just asking for a flat.
    The draft from cars sweeps all the debris in the road to the side as
    they pass, that means if you ride on a busy road in the "bike lane" or
    in the gutter you are riding thru all the glass. If you notice you
    just ran over a patch of broken glass, put your shoe on your tire as
    you ride for a moment to brush it off, most pieces of glass do not
    cause a flat as soon as you run them over, they stick and then every
    time they hit the pavment they go in a little further. If you can find
    a route that has less traffic, and ride down the middle of the lane you
    will get less flats then someone who rides two blocks over in the "bike
    lane".
    p.s. I hate "bike lanes" what a joke.
    -Tim
     
  17. On 21 Feb 2006 17:24:07 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am a wrench, I have seen tuffie strips cause
    > about 10-15 flats in the
    > years I've been changing flats. Every time
    > I have changed a tire with
    > a tuffie strip in it, the tuffie strip has been the cause of the flat,
    > and normaly it's at the edge not at the end of the tuffie strip.


    I'm not a wrench. Guess I have been lucky as I've used Mr. Tuffies
    for over 10 years with no problems at all....

    JT

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