Tire patches/dried glue

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by George F. Johns, Mar 24, 2003.

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  1. I had a puncture yesterday so I got out the patch kit only to find that (once again) the glue had
    dried up, so I used one of my Park glueless patches only to have the tire go flat again in 5
    minutes. On average I manage only one repair per tube of glue and the glueless patches I've tried
    hold air for about 5 minutes. I've even opened at least one brand new tube to find it dried up. I
    tried buying just the glue at the LBS but they only had it in larger tubes that cost more than a
    patch kit so as a result I have an excess of patches but no glue. Has anyone found a better way? I
    am g(c?)lueless.

    George F. Johnson
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >I had a puncture yesterday so I got out the patch kit only to find that (once again) the glue had
    >dried up, so I used one of my Park glueless patches only
    to
    >have the tire go flat again in 5 minutes. On average I manage only one repair per tube of glue and
    >the glueless patches I've tried hold air for about 5 minutes. I've even opened at least one brand
    >new tube to find it dried up. I tried buying just the glue at the LBS but they only had it in
    >larger tubes
    that
    >cost more than a patch kit so as a result I have an excess of patches but no glue. Has anyone found
    >a better way? I am g(c?)lueless.

    I keep an extra tube in my seat pack as well as a full container of the glueless patches. If I get a
    flat, I can just replace the tube and keep riding. If I get unlucky and get a second flat, I use the
    glueless patches. I've never had one fail right away, I have had them fail about a year later. When
    I collect about 5 tubes with holes in them, I do a mass patching session. I bought a large tube of
    glue from the auto parts place. It hasn't dried up on me like the tiny ones that comes with the
    patch kits do.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  3. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Once you open a tube of glue, put it in the refrigerator at home and use it to patch tires there.
    Put a piece of polyetheylene between the cap and the threads on the tube. On the bicycle, try to
    carry unopened glue.

    You also can buy about $3 worth of glue in an auto store and use up all the patches you have.

    On 24 Mar 2003 17:39:43 GMT, [email protected] (George F. Johnson) wrote:

    > I've even opened at least one brand new tube to find it dried up. I tried buying just the glue at
    > the LBS but they only had it in larger tubes that cost more than a patch kit so as a result I have
    > an excess of patches but no glue. Has anyone found a better way? I am g(c?)lueless.
     
  4. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    George F. Johnson wrote:

    > I had a puncture yesterday so I got out the patch kit only to find that (once again) the glue had
    > dried up,

    Glue in those little tubes dries up because of contact with air. When you use the glue, make sure
    you squeeze out all of the air from the tube before putting the cap back on. Doing this, I can make
    one tube last a year or more.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  5. bball

    bball Guest

    On 24 Mar 2003 17:39:43 GMT, [email protected] (George F. Johnson) wrote:

    >I had a puncture yesterday so I got out the patch kit only to find that (once again) the glue had
    >dried up, so I used one of my Park glueless patches only to have the tire go flat again in 5
    >minutes. On average I manage only one repair per tube of glue and the glueless patches I've tried
    >hold air for about 5 minutes. I've even opened at least one brand new tube to find it dried up. I
    >tried buying just the glue at the LBS but they only had it in larger tubes that cost more than a
    >patch kit so as a result I have an excess of patches but no glue. Has anyone found a better way? I
    >am g(c?)lueless.
    >
    >George F. Johnson
    ----------------------------

    Single most important thing after using the glue tube is to roll up the bottom, expelling all the
    air before capping. I have several partial tubes in different patch kits used over the past three
    years and 20K miles of riding on 4 bikes. Never have a dried glue problem.

    rambling on --

    Currently I have 4 patch kits with 5 partial tubes, and have purchased approx 30 additional single
    patches to replentish the kits along the way. I can't understand why many cyclists run out of glue.
    I squeeze from the tube bottom, rub a thin film over the sanded patch area using the tube head,
    recap quickly after holding the tube vertically, squeezing out any small amount of air from the
    tube. Minimize the uncapped time as the solvent is volatile.

    One only needs a thin, surface-covering film of glue to ensure a patch job that lasts the life of
    the tube; more is not better. I often reinstall the tubes after patching, pump them up to 100psi
    without problem.

    Sometimes, e.g., when you find a goathead still sticking in the tire, it's easier to dismount a
    portion of the tire while the wheel is still on the bike, pull out a section of the tube, repair
    When possible I work the repair on a tube inflated approx to operating diameter, or somewhat larger.
    (Don't ferget to pull the goathead out of the tire before reinstalling the tube!)

    reporting from the land of the kevlar-defying goathead,

    Bruce Ball Colo Spgs
     
  6. Jim Quinn

    Jim Quinn Guest

    I bought a 100 patches from Loose Screws website. That along with one of those big tubes of glue has
    lasted me a couple of years.

    "Paul Kopit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Once you open a tube of glue, put it in the refrigerator at home and use it to patch tires there.
    > Put a piece of polyetheylene between the cap and the threads on the tube. On the bicycle, try to
    > carry unopened glue.
    >
    > You also can buy about $3 worth of glue in an auto store and use up all the patches you have.
    >
    > On 24 Mar 2003 17:39:43 GMT, [email protected] (George F. Johnson) wrote:
    >
    > > I've even opened at least one brand new tube to find it dried up. I
    > > tried buying just the glue at the LBS but they only had it in larger
    tubes that
    > >cost more than a patch kit so as a result I have an excess of patches but
    no
    > >glue. Has anyone found a better way? I am g(c?)lueless.
     
  7. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (George F. Johnson) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... Has anyone found a better way? I am
    g(c?)lueless.
    >
    > George F. Johnson

    I dont know what im doing right, but my little tubes last until they run out of glue. i have one
    that has been opened for at least two years. perhaps it makes a difference that i squeeze the tube
    until the glue (cement?) bubbles up to the top, and then screw the cap down.

    cheers
     
  8. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Once you open a tube of glue, put it in the refrigerator at home and use it to patch tires there.
    > Put a piece of polyetheylene between the cap and the threads on the tube. On the bicycle, try to
    > carry unopened glue.
    >
    > You also can buy about $3 worth of glue in an auto store and use up all the patches you have.

    Is patching glue different from plain old rubber cement, like from an office supply place?

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  9. kh6zv9

    kh6zv9 Guest

    Ray Heindl <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:

    :> Once you open a tube of glue, put it in the refrigerator at home and use it to patch tires there.
    :> Put a piece of polyetheylene between the cap and the threads on the tube. On the bicycle, try to
    :> carry unopened glue.
    :>
    :> You also can buy about $3 worth of glue in an auto store and use up all the patches you have.

    : Is patching glue different from plain old rubber cement, like from an office supply place?

    : --
    : Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)

    Rubber Cement is fine.

    That is all that I ever use when I do my patching at home. The bottle has a handy little brush and
    lasts for years if you keep the lid tight.

    --------------------------------
    Bob Masse' [email protected]
    --------------------------------
     
  10. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Ray Heindl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: Is patching glue different from plain old rubber cement, like from an office supply place?
    >
    > Rubber Cement is fine.
    >
    > That is all that I ever use when I do my patching at home. The bottle has a handy little brush and
    > lasts for years if you keep the lid tight.

    Unfortunately the only kind I've been able to find lately comes in a plastic bottle, and it doesn't
    last very long -- a couple years seems to be about the limit. I presume the solvent (toluene?) can
    slowly diffuse out through the plastic.

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  11. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Sometimes, e.g., when you find a goathead still sticking in the tire,

    ... a sure sign that satanists have been interfering with your bike. :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  12. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (ant) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I dont know what im doing right...

    Maybe you do though.

    > perhaps it makes a difference that i squeeze the tube until the glue (cement?) bubbles up to the
    > top, and then screw the cap down.

    I think that's it.

    --
    Dave...
     
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