Tire Shelf Life? And how to lengthen it?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bandjhughes, Jun 11, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bandjhughes

    Bandjhughes Guest

    Due to a variety of reasons, I have about a dozen extra tires all with very low mileage on them
    hanging from the rafters in my garage. They're out of sunlight, but the garage gets hot (+100 deg F)
    in the summer and cold in the winter (below freezing). I'm wondering, what is the shelf life on
    tires in a non-climate controlled storage environment like a garage or shed. And my other question
    is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting them in something like a
    plastic bag help)?

    I really don't care to try to sell slightly used bike tires, and eventually these tires should all
    wind back on one of my bikes.

    Brian
     
    Tags:


  2. Ny Rides

    Ny Rides Guest

    My bike recycling program gets donations of tires from several bike manufacturers. Usually, these
    tires have been removed from stock after sitting on shelves for several years.

    One particular lot in our shop has been around since 1997. We haven't used them because they're an
    ugly color, but they're still in pretty good shape. Another lot, on the other hand, has only been
    around for about two years, and they're all dry-rotted and/or cracking.

    I asked a friend, who owns a bicycle company here in NY, about extending the shelf-life of tires and
    he had no suggestions. I think it's just luck.

    --
    Low-Impact Rides In The LI/NY Area www.geocities.com/NYRides "bandjhughes"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Due to a variety of reasons, I have about a dozen extra tires all with very low mileage on them
    > hanging from the rafters in my garage. They're out of sunlight, but the garage gets hot (+100 deg
    > F) in the summer and cold in the winter (below freezing). I'm wondering, what is the shelf life on
    > tires in a non-climate controlled storage environment like a garage or shed. And my other question
    > is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting them in something like a
    > plastic bag help)?
    >
    > I really don't care to try to sell slightly used bike tires, and eventually these tires should all
    > wind back on one of my bikes.
    >
    > Brian
     
  3. I once heard about sew-ups that they should be kept in the dark and cool (but not freezing). I guess
    it goes for most rubber and silica.

    "bandjhughes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Due to a variety of reasons, I have about a dozen extra tires all with very low mileage on them
    > hanging from the rafters in my garage. They're out of sunlight, but the garage gets hot (+100 deg
    > F) in the summer and cold in the winter (below freezing). I'm wondering, what is the shelf life on
    > tires in a non-climate controlled storage environment like a garage or shed. And my other question
    > is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting them in something like a
    > plastic bag help)?
    >
    > I really don't care to try to sell slightly used bike tires, and eventually these tires should all
    > wind back on one of my bikes.
    >
    > Brian
     
  4. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Minimize oxidants like oxygen, ozone, UV radiation and elevated temperatures. Practically speaking
    this is like our forefathers stored tires - room temperature and wrapped in kraft/waxed paper. How
    soon we forget.

    "bandjhughes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Due to a variety of reasons, I have about a dozen extra tires all with very low mileage on them
    > hanging from the rafters in my garage. They're out of sunlight, but the garage gets hot (+100 deg
    > F) in the summer and cold in the winter (below freezing). I'm wondering, what is the shelf life on
    > tires in a non-climate controlled storage environment like a garage or shed. And my other question
    > is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting them in something like a
    > plastic bag help)?
    >
    > I really don't care to try to sell slightly used bike tires, and eventually these tires should all
    > wind back on one of my bikes.
    >
    > Brian
     
  5. Dan

    Dan Guest

    I had 3 of the same tires-two in the box, one not. Exact same age/date. The box had clear windows so
    didn't block all the light. They were in a garage, gets warm/cold, etc, flourescent lighting off 99%
    of the time.

    After ~10 years, the loose one had discolored, dry rotted. Both in the box were still in
    great shape.

    I don't think any got much UV, same temps.

    Anyway, food for thought...

    Dan

    Doug Huffman wrote:
    > Minimize oxidants like oxygen, ozone, UV radiation and elevated temperatures. Practically speaking
    > this is like our forefathers stored tires - room temperature and wrapped in kraft/waxed paper. How
    > soon we forget.
     
  6. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    > Due to a variety of reasons, I have about a dozen extra tires all with very low mileage on them
    > hanging from the rafters in my garage. They're out of sunlight, but the garage gets hot (+100 deg
    > F) in the summer and cold in the winter (below freezing). I'm wondering, what is the shelf life on
    > tires in a non-climate controlled storage environment like a garage or shed. And my other question
    > is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting them in something like a
    > plastic bag help)?
    >
    > I really don't care to try to sell slightly used bike tires, and eventually these tires should all
    > wind back on one of my bikes.
    >
    > Brian

    Yesterday, I got out a spare tire from the box and where it was folded, the rubber had cracked
    completely. I immediately took the rest of the spares from the garage and put them in the house. A
    few years ago, the foam on my saddle turned to powder after being in the garage 2 years. I could put
    my finger on the top of the saddle and leave a permanent depression! As a result, I have my road
    bike in the house. I know I can't put every bike in the house, though. Houses need an extra room
    just for bikes! ( well, other than the dining room)

    Pat in Texas---where we know HOT.
     
  7. In alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent Pat <[email protected]> wrote:
    : result, I have my road bike in the house. I know I can't put every bike in the house, though.
    : Houses need an extra room just for bikes! ( well, other than the dining room)

    Maybe you can put the bikes in the same room that you put the computers?

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  8. On 15 Jun 2003 [email protected] wrote:

    > In alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent Pat <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : result, I have my road bike in the house. I know I can't put every bike in the house, though.
    > : Houses need an extra room just for bikes! ( well, other than the dining room)
    >
    > Maybe you can put the bikes in the same room that you put the computers?

    Bad idea if there is a laser printer or copier in that room--both are ozone sources, as are electric
    motors that spark on startup (starting switch).
     
  9. Mark Stonich

    Mark Stonich Guest

    [email protected] (bandjhughes) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > And my other question is, what can someone do to lengthen tire shelf life (i.e., would putting
    > them in something like a plastic bag help)?

    I store tires I expect to be around for a while in black plastic lawn bags.

    I have some Hydyne HPV 20" x 1 1/4" that are still soft and pliable. They are at least 16 years
    old. They were made by Carlisle, here in the USA, and Carlisle has been out of business for a long
    time. I've heard that the Hudynes were the last batch of bicycle tires ever made in the US.

    In the same bag are some of the original Conti Avenues. Unlike the current ones, they are
    completely slick, with tread not much thicker than a condom. About the same rolling resistance as
    an air hockey puck, but at 1.75" they catch too much air for serious high speed work.
     
  10. Mark,

    > I have some Hydyne HPV 20" x 1 1/4" that are still soft and pliable.

    I have three, which have been on various trikes and bikes over the last 15 years. I don't leave them
    on anything too long. I don't want to wear them out. I love those tires.

    > They were made by Carlisle, here in the USA, and Carlisle has been out of business for a long
    > time. I've heard that the Hudynes were the last batch of bicycle tires ever made in the US.

    I've heard that as well. Another reason I want to hang onto them.

    Carlisle isn't gone, by the way, just morphed into a multi-national giant.

    http://www.carlisle.com/profile/history.html

    Warren
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...