Tired legs

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mark Drayton, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. Mark Drayton

    Mark Drayton Guest

    Hi

    I'm cycling approx 80 - 100 miles a week at the moment, mostly at a reasonable pace. My typical week
    is as follows:

    Sunday: club ride, 40ish miles on pretty flat terrain, 17-18mph average Tuesday: evening chaingang,
    15 - 20 miles at about 17mph to get there and back and about 10 - 15 miles at a hard pace with the
    group Thursday: 10 mile TT in evening or soon to be 30ish mile road race Saturday: rest or perhaps
    shortish ride with intervals

    The problem is that more often than not my legs feel slow or tired during the day. They're really
    not keen on moving when asked! I often feel awful on the bike for a few miles at the start of a ride
    but then my legs "wake up" and I start to ride better.

    I'm not losing weight, so I presume I'm eating enough. I get 7.5 to 8 hours sleep a night and don't
    feel conventionally tired during the day.

    How can I reduce this jaded feeling? I do stretch before riding and try to remember to stretch
    afterwards, though I often fail this. I'd like to up the amount of training I'm doing, but I'm
    reluctant to until I work out why I don't seem to recover very quickly.

    Cheers,

    Mark Drayton
     
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  2. Mark Drayton wrote:
    > I'm cycling approx 80 - 100 miles a week at the moment, mostly at a reasonable pace. My typical
    > week is as follows:
    >
    > Sunday: club ride, 40ish miles on pretty flat terrain, 17-18mph average Tuesday: evening
    > chaingang, 15 - 20 miles at about 17mph to get there and back and about 10 - 15 miles at a hard
    > pace with the group Thursday: 10 mile TT in evening or soon to be 30ish mile road race Saturday:
    > rest or perhaps shortish ride with intervals
    >
    > The problem is that more often than not my legs feel slow or tired during the day. They're really
    > not keen on moving when asked! I often feel awful on the bike for a few miles at the start of a
    > ride but then my legs "wake up" and I start to ride better.
    >
    > I'm not losing weight, so I presume I'm eating enough. I get 7.5 to 8 hours sleep a night and
    > don't feel conventionally tired during the day.
    >
    > How can I reduce this jaded feeling? I do stretch before riding and try to remember to stretch
    > afterwards, though I often fail this. I'd like to up the amount of training I'm doing, but I'm
    > reluctant to until I work out why I don't seem to recover very quickly.

    When are you eating in relation to when you ride?

    How long have you been cycling at this rate?

    I get tired legs normally when I haven't eaten much before cycling i.e. cycling mid-morning, and
    they were particularly bad when I was just getting back into the swing of things (now I just have
    sore knees!).

    --
    StainlessSteelRat "All our science, measured against reality, is primitive and childlike-and yet it
    is the most precious thing we have." -- Albert Einstein
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 15:45:15 -0000, Mark Drayton <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The problem is that more often than not my legs feel slow or tired during the day.

    Eat-a more pasta, like-a mamma says :)

    Dojn't get hung up about it, though - riding hard makes your legs hurt. No pain no gain. My legs
    often feel like lead if I ride home at nutter pace (7.5 miles at over 20mph average), and when I
    ride fast to and from work on a Wednesday and then do a club ride with a couple of big hills in the
    evening, I am hard pressed to keep out of the bottom ring most of the way to work next day. As
    summer progresses the hurt vanishes and is replaced by (a) more speed and (b) nice comments from
    Myra about your legs[1].

    [1] Terms and conditions apply, your mileage may vary.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
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  4. Msa

    Msa Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 15:45:15 -0000, Mark Drayton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >The problem is that more often than not my legs feel slow or tired during the day.

    If it's any consolation...

    I ride 5 days per week, approx. 350-400km. I ride hard, averaging 30+k so I would class myself as a
    'seasoned rider'. 3 weeks ago I pushed myself over the limit on a 40k TT into a head wind and my
    legs were like lead for the following 4 days, with aches still being felt 7 days after!

    As long as it's not pain from an incorrect set-up, ride through it, it will do you good.

    I stress though, make sure it's not from an incorrect set-up otherwise you could screw up ya knees
    etc. for good.

    --
    Mark
    ____________________________
    Practice does not make perfect... Perfect practice makes perfect

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  5. Mark Drayton

    Mark Drayton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, StainlessSteelRat wrote:
    > Mark Drayton wrote:
    > > The problem is that more often than not my legs feel slow or tired during the day. They're
    > > really not keen on moving when asked! I often feel awful on the bike for a few miles at the
    > > start of a ride but then my legs "wake up" and I start to ride better.
    > >
    > > [..]
    > >
    > > How can I reduce this jaded feeling? I do stretch before riding and try to remember to stretch
    > > afterwards, though I often fail this. I'd like to up the amount of training I'm doing, but I'm
    > > reluctant to until I work out why I don't seem to recover very quickly.
    >
    > When are you eating in relation to when you ride?

    If I'm going for an evening TT or chaingang (both start at 7ish), I might have a small snack
    beforehand and eat my main meal afterwards. I often feel sick when trying hard, and with a full meal
    inside I'd probably feel worse!

    I eat breakfast (porridge) before going on a morning ride.

    > How long have you been cycling at this rate?

    I've been doing a base of about 60 miles a week for most of the winter but I've only started the
    chaingang and TTs in the last month or so. I hope I'm just 'wearing in'!

    The tired feeling doesn't seem to affect me, though: last night I had tired feeling legs and did a
    TT I was very pleased with (7th out of 21 on my 3rd TT!).

    Cheers,

    Mark Drayton
     
  6. >That's good to hear. Now he'll need a computer so he knows how much faster he is than Mum ;-)

    He is speeding up quite a bit now. He's just starting to notice the benefits of cycling on his
    stamina and on his physique - he was showing off his developing calf muscles last night - LOL :)

    So far he's now really starting to enjoy his cycling and is chuffed to ribbons with his new bike,
    especially since he's been promised carbon forks for it ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  7. Mark Drayton

    Mark Drayton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, StainlessSteelRat wrote:
    > Mark Drayton wrote:
    > > I've been doing a base of about 60 miles a week for most of the winter but I've only started the
    > > chaingang and TTs in the last month or so. I hope I'm just 'wearing in'!
    >
    > I would think give it another month or so to see how it goes. Has the winter training been
    > outdoors? i.e. real cycling.

    Yeah, nearly all of it was outdoors.

    I'm pretty sure it's down to training volume. I'll have a few easy days before resuming my current
    workload and see if that's enough to catch up.

    Cheers,

    Mark Drayton
     
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