Tires

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dan Hall, Oct 13, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Dan Hall

    Dan Hall Guest

    I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of her
    for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830 with
    these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to make her
    bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with tires that are
    about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it. Any help will
    probably add to our marital bliss. -Dan

    PS; I realized on the way home that my bike is geared higher than hers, but gears are probably too
    expensive to change.
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    >her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830 with
    >these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to make her
    >bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with tires that are
    >about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it. Any help will
    >probably add to our marital bliss.

    Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.

    --Paul
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    > her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    > with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to make
    > her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with tires that
    > are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it. Any help will
    > probably add to our marital bliss. -Dan
    >
    > PS; I realized on the way home that my bike is geared higher than hers, but gears are probably too
    > expensive to change.

    Actually, gears aren't much (if any) more expensive than two tires if you do the work yourself.
    However, you'll still waste energy, just at a different cadence. Get rid of the knobbies and get a
    couple of slicks, and you'll see a huge difference in how easy it is to pedal at a given speed.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  4. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    Get some Kenda Kwiks they hold 100 psi and roll fast .I use them on my Mtn bike when the weather
    gets nasty.I have a nice road bike but save it for century rides and summer riding .It will make a
    difference.

    --
    J/O Trailblazer At large !!
     
  5. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    Arpit <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    > >>her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    > >>with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to
    > >>make her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with
    > >>tires that are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it.
    > >>Any help will probably add to our marital bliss.
    > >
    > >Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    > >mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >
    > sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    > able to go offroad :(
    > >
    One option that you may want to look at is Avocet Cross tires. The tire has an inverted tread that
    allows you to have low rolling resistance on paved roads, yet the "inverted" tread allows you to go
    "offroad". For more info see here:

    http://www.avocet.com/tirepages/cross_2_specs.html

    Your LBS should be able to get them or they're available online here:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/tires/559.html or here: http://www.gtgtandems.com/parts/26c.html
     
  6. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "tsp" <[email protected]> writes:
    > i have 1.35" on my mountain bike...theyre hutchinson acrobats...recommended 58psi max 86psi.. im
    > running at somewhere around 80psi and theyre terrific so far. havent had a pinch or had the wheel
    > go out of true

    It would be interesting to find out what kind of sidewalls they have.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  7. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Arpit wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    > >>her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    > >>with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to
    > >>make her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with
    > >>tires that are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it.
    > >>Any help will probably add to our marital bliss.
    > >
    > >Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    > >mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >
    > sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    > able to go offroad :(

    I've got ordinary MTB-size tires with smooth where they contact the road, but I pump them up to 80
    pounds (max on the sidewall). I think I need to replace/fix the front tube, it only holds that
    pressure for a few days.

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    ==============================================================
    Everyone crashes. Some get back on. Some don't. Some can't.
     
  8. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Arpit wrote:

    >On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    >>>her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    >>>with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to make
    >>>her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with tires that
    >>>are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it. Any help will
    >>>probably add to our marital bliss.
    >>>
    >>Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    >>mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >>
    >
    >sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    >able to go offroad :(
    >
    >>--Paul
    >>
    >
    My older brother rides his rigid frame mtn bike in any conditions from city to canyon on the same
    set of "semi-slicks". Sorry I don't know the brand, but about 26 x .75 with smooth middle and lugs
    on the edges. He and I rode lots of miles in Death Valley on those tires. (I used Kenda Kwiks 26 x
    1.7) on my old rigid Norco. He calls his ride his "Swiss Army Bike" because it is useful in so many
    circumstances. It is obvious that semi slicks are good unless you are doing extreme rides = or at
    least they are worth a look.

    Bernie
     
  9. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    >>her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    >>with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to make
    >>her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with tires that
    >>are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it. Any help will
    >>probably add to our marital bliss.
    >
    >Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    >mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.

    sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be able
    to go offroad :(
    >
    >--Paul
     
  10. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 19:52:28 -0700, Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Arpit wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead of
    >>>>her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek 830
    >>>>with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do to
    >>>>make her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with
    >>>>tires that are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it.
    >>>>Any help will probably add to our marital bliss.
    >>>>
    >>>Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    >>>mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >>>
    >>
    >>sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    >>able to go offroad :(
    >>
    >>>--Paul
    >>>
    >>
    >My older brother rides his rigid frame mtn bike in any conditions from city to canyon on the same
    >set of "semi-slicks". Sorry I don't know the brand, but about 26 x .75 with smooth middle and lugs
    >on the edges. He and I rode lots of miles in Death Valley on those tires. (I used Kenda Kwiks 26 x
    >1.7) on my old rigid Norco. He calls his ride his "Swiss Army Bike" because it is useful in so many
    >circumstances. It is obvious that semi slicks are good unless you are doing extreme rides = or at
    >least they are worth a look.
    >
    >Bernie

    I've had good luck with Continental Travel Contacts. Similar, if not the same, as what you describe-
    wide smooth center with distinct lugs on the edges. On the road at 60 psi or so, they roll very nice
    and the lugs don't come into play (on an extreme turn they might, but I don't do fast tight turns
    very often). Drop the pressure to 35-45 and I am able to go down most trails. Not the same as full
    knobbies, but then I can actually *get* to the trails with the semi-slicks.

    The Continentals are on the heavy side- 700 grams? 26" x 1.75. Very solid, long life, no punctures
    in months of city riding and no flats off trail.
     
  11. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Bernie wrote:

    >
    >
    > Arpit wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead
    >>>> of her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek
    >>>> 830 with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do
    >>>> to make her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with
    >>>> tires that are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it.
    >>>> Any help will probably add to our marital bliss.
    >>>>
    >>> Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    >>> mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >>>
    >>
    >> sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    >> able to go offroad :(
    >>
    >>> --Paul
    >>>
    >>
    > My older brother rides his rigid frame mtn bike in any conditions from city to canyon on the same
    > set of "semi-slicks". Sorry I don't know the brand, but about 26 x .75 with smooth middle and lugs
    > on the edges. He and I rode lots of miles in Death Valley on those tires. (I used Kenda Kwiks 26 x
    > 1.7) on my old rigid Norco. He calls his ride his "Swiss Army Bike" because it is useful in so
    > many circumstances. It is obvious that semi slicks are good unless you are doing extreme rides =
    > or at least they are worth a look.
    >
    > Bernie
    >
    Ooops! I meant he rides on 26 x 1.75 tires, not .75. Bernie
     
  12. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Dan Daniel wrote:

    >On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 19:52:28 -0700, Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Arpit wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:19:02 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Southworth) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In article <[email protected]>, Dan Hall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I went for a ride yesterday with my spouse and thought that I was doing so well to stay ahead
    >>>>>of her for the first couple of miles until she asked me to ride her bike back. She has a Trek
    >>>>>830 with these really big tires and I was working my butt off just to get home! What can I do
    >>>>>to make her bike run down the trail easier like mine does? I have a Trek 720 Crosstrainer with
    >>>>>tires that are about an inch narrower than hers so I'm sure that has something to do with it.
    >>>>>Any help will probably add to our marital bliss.
    >>>>>
    >>>>Use a smooth tire, smaller size, higher pressure. A 1.5" slick usually works pretty well for
    >>>>mountain bikes on the road. Narrower may also work OK depending on the rim.
    >>>>
    >>>sigh, I always struggle on the roads with my mtb tires, but Iiff I replaced the,m, I wouldnt be
    >>>able to go offroad :(
    >>>
    >>>>--Paul
    >>>>
    >>My older brother rides his rigid frame mtn bike in any conditions from city to canyon on the same
    >>set of "semi-slicks". Sorry I don't know the brand, but about 26 x .75 with smooth middle and lugs
    >>on the edges. He and I rode lots of miles in Death Valley on those tires. (I used Kenda Kwiks 26 x
    >>1.7) on my old rigid Norco. He calls his ride his "Swiss Army Bike" because it is useful in so
    >>many circumstances. It is obvious that semi slicks are good unless you are doing extreme rides =
    >>or at least they are worth a look.
    >>
    >>Bernie
    >>
    >
    >I've had good luck with Continental Travel Contacts. Similar, if not the same, as what you
    >describe- wide smooth center with distinct lugs on the edges. On the road at 60 psi or so, they
    >roll very nice and the lugs don't come into play (on an extreme turn they might, but I don't do
    >fast tight turns very often). Drop the pressure to 35-45 and I am able to go down most trails. Not
    >the same as full knobbies, but then I can actually *get* to the trails with the semi-slicks.
    >
    >The Continentals are on the heavy side- 700 grams? 26" x 1.75. Very solid, long life, no punctures
    >in months of city riding and no flats off trail.
    >
    Haven't heard of that tire, but Continentals of course have a good rep. I'm riding my "winter
    beater" old Norco with the Kenda Kwiks on a commute that consist of city streets and railway
    slag/ballast. I keep em pumped around 50 - 60 psi. They feel like good and tuff winter tires so far.
    You mention city riding. Does that mean you cycle commute? It's definitely a personal choice, but
    best of luck to you if you do. Bernie
     
  13. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 03:17:40 -0700, Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Dan Daniel wrote:
    >

    >>
    >>I've had good luck with Continental Travel Contacts. Similar, if not the same, as what you
    >>describe- wide smooth center with distinct lugs on the edges. On the road at 60 psi or so, they
    >>roll very nice and the lugs don't come into play (on an extreme turn they might, but I don't do
    >>fast tight turns very often). Drop the pressure to 35-45 and I am able to go down most trails. Not
    >>the same as full knobbies, but then I can actually *get* to the trails with the semi-slicks.
    >>
    >>The Continentals are on the heavy side- 700 grams? 26" x 1.75. Very solid, long life, no punctures
    >>in months of city riding and no flats off trail.
    >>
    >Haven't heard of that tire, but Continentals of course have a good rep. I'm riding my
    >"winter beater" old Norco with the Kenda Kwiks on a commute that consist of city streets and
    >railway slag/ballast. I keep em pumped around 50 - 60 psi. They feel like good and tuff
    >winter tires so far.

    The Kendas look like nice tires. They struck me as a touch too slick and thin for going on dirt,
    which the Travel Contacts handle ok.

    >You mention city riding. Does that mean you cycle commute? It's definitely a personal choice, but
    >best of luck to you if you do. Bernie

    Hard to read what you wrote here- do you think it is a questionable choice I am making?

    I'm in San Francisco where using a car is asking for aggravation and delays and parking tickets. I
    got rid of the car years ago. The bus system is good all in all, but has its own aggravations and
    delays. Bicycling is the best way to get around. I have very few problems with cars. It's almost
    like playing that old video game, Asteroids, just always expecting giant 'rocks' to come flying in
    from anywhere and being prepared.

    Most days it is other bicyclists doing stupid things that create more hazards than cars, it seems.
    The Critical Mass crowd is a two-edged sword to me. Some of their actions pushed bicycling into
    public attention in ways that I don't think would have happened otherwise. All bicyclists here did
    benefit from this, if only because more mainstream cyclists' demands were then seen as acceptable.

    But the cowboy pseudo-anarchist types can make day-to-day cycling hazardous as they run red lights,
    go the wrong way on streets, etc. If the same percentage of car drivers made as many boneheaded
    moves as cyclists do, traffic would grind to a halt from all the accidents.
     
  14. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Dan Daniel wrote:

    >On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 03:17:40 -0700, Bernie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Dan Daniel wrote:
    >>
    >
    >>>I've had good luck with Continental Travel Contacts. Similar, if not the same, as what you
    >>>describe- wide smooth center with distinct lugs on the edges. On the road at 60 psi or so, they
    >>>roll very nice and the lugs don't come into play (on an extreme turn they might, but I don't do
    >>>fast tight turns very often). Drop the pressure to 35-45 and I am able to go down most trails.
    >>>Not the same as full knobbies, but then I can actually *get* to the trails with the semi-slicks.
    >>>
    >>>The Continentals are on the heavy side- 700 grams? 26" x 1.75. Very solid, long life, no
    >>>punctures in months of city riding and no flats off trail.
    >>>
    >>Haven't heard of that tire, but Continentals of course have a good rep. I'm riding my
    >>"winter beater" old Norco with the Kenda Kwiks on a commute that consist of city streets and
    >>railway slag/ballast. I keep em pumped around 50 - 60 psi. They feel like good and tuff
    >>winter tires so far.
    >>
    >
    >The Kendas look like nice tires. They struck me as a touch too slick and thin for going on dirt,
    >which the Travel Contacts handle ok.
    >
    >>You mention city riding. Does that mean you cycle commute? It's definitely a personal choice, but
    >>best of luck to you if you do. Bernie
    >>
    >
    >Hard to read what you wrote here- do you think it is a questionable choice I am making?
    >
    No, I think semi-slicks like you describe are a good choice. I'll likely end up with a pair in the
    future. I already have the Kendas, so I'll try to wear them out. My rides are mainly pavement with
    some crushed stone and rough shortcuts thrown in.

    >
    >
    >I'm in San Francisco where using a car is asking for aggravation and delays and parking tickets. I
    >got rid of the car years ago. The bus system is good all in all, but has its own aggravations and
    >delays. Bicycling is the best way to get around. I have very few problems with cars. It's almost
    >like playing that old video game, Asteroids, just always expecting giant 'rocks' to come flying in
    >from anywhere and being prepared.
    >
    ;) yeah, i find city riding to often be like a video game too. I've biked in the Bay area several
    times, mainly Oakland and Berkeley, and the watershed past Skyline. I don't think driver behaviour
    is worse than in Vancouver, although I expected it to be less tolerant. It's not though, IMO.

    >
    >Most days it is other bicyclists doing stupid things that create more hazards than cars, it seems.
    >The Critical Mass crowd is a two-edged sword to me. Some of their actions pushed bicycling into
    >public attention in ways that I don't think would have happened otherwise. All bicyclists here did
    >benefit from this, if only because more mainstream cyclists' demands were then seen as acceptable.
    >
    >But the cowboy pseudo-anarchist types can make day-to-day cycling hazardous as they run red lights,
    >go the wrong way on streets, etc. If the same percentage of car drivers made as many boneheaded
    >moves as cyclists do, traffic would grind to a halt from all the accidents.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...