Tires

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by chasbwdc, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. chasbwdc

    chasbwdc New Member

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    I have been getting an a lot of flats lately and was wondering if my tire pressure could be the problem. The tires have a maximum pressure of 125 and I keep them at 120. What is the appropriate tire pressure? I assumed keeping it close to the max would reduce pinch flats but am not sure if this is causing any other issues. Also can someone recommend a good tire for urban commuting? I am currently using Kenda Kontender 700x25.
     
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  2. Akadat

    Akadat New Member

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    Your tyre pressure is good for performance and avoiding pinch flats. In my opinion the puncture problem is ease of penetration through the tread.

    Depends on your commute...lots of broken glass, potholes, riding on verges and kerb jumping then go for a fatter tyre with puncture protection. If it's racing amongst the cars on cleaned surfaces then you shouldn't be getting too many punctures...but that happens too!

    Have a look at puncture resistant tyres. Continental make a 700 x 28 that goes to 85 max psi (Sport Contact). The puncture problem is drastically reduced but 85 psi is a little soft compared to what you are currently using. There are many other brands offering puncture resistance.
     
  3. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Lower pressure should help reduce punctures. The Conti 4000s I run show a recommended pressure of 110 psi for the 23s....and they for racing, not commuting. 100 psi should be plenty for 25s, unless you're a heavyweight (eg, >200 lbs).

    As akadat said, have a look at more puncture-resistant tires. Agree that wider is better for your application, since a 28 will allow lower pressures, a better ride, and longer life. Don't worry about rolling resistance or aero drag.....the increases are negligible at commuter speeds.
     
  4. longfemur

    longfemur New Member

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    In my opinion, you can't go by the maximum pressure embossed on the sidewall. What pressure you need for a tire of any given width depends on your weight (and if you carry a load, the weight of the load). Pressure too high is no better than pressure too low in terms of flat resistance. Michelin has a good chart you can use for this on its website. Just go to the bicycle tire section.

    For commuting, I personally don't think any racing tire is suitable, nor anything smaller than 25 mm. Most roads are just too punishing to tires -- rough, and full of tire shredding debris. Toughness is more important than rolling resistance, except on any kind of cycling forum, where of course, everyone is a racer.
     
  5. buckybux

    buckybux New Member

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    I agree that road racing tires and commuting tires are different. I use for commuting, Continential Contact Tire, and have been having good luck. I also use in the commuting tire only, a tire liner which also helps. If you are getting a lot of flats, be sure to check where they are occuring because if it is rim tape, the flats will be on the inside of the tube.

    I run them at 80 lbs. psi.
     
  6. Goandkickit

    Goandkickit New Member

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    I recommend Dutch Perfect tyres, you are highly unlikely to ever get a puncture with them.
     
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