Titanium vs Aluminum vs Carbon dropouts?



S

Scott Gordo

Guest
Found this sorta interesting:

http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php...s/wellens_ridley_xnight_cross/WellensIMG_5532

The article provides a rundown of Bart Wellens' Ridley cross bike.
It's has a carbon frame with titanium dropouts:

"Titanium dropouts are new on this year's bike. They're slightly
heavier than aluminum but stiffer and stronger. "

Not sure if aluminum is actually less stiff in this application
(likely forged and then cnc'd) than aluminum, but the titanium dropout
is likely stiffer than aluminum with a replaceable dropout bolted on.

Yep.

Scott
 
B

Bruce Gilbert

Guest
"Scott Gordo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Found this sorta interesting:
>
>

http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php...s/wellens_ridley_xnight_cross/WellensIMG_5532
>
> The article provides a rundown of Bart Wellens' Ridley cross bike.
> It's has a carbon frame with titanium dropouts:
>
> "Titanium dropouts are new on this year's bike. They're slightly
> heavier than aluminum but stiffer and stronger. "
>
> Not sure if aluminum is actually less stiff in this application
> (likely forged and then cnc'd) than aluminum, but the titanium dropout
> is likely stiffer than aluminum with a replaceable dropout bolted on.
>
> Yep.
>
> Scott
>


I noticed carbon dropouts on a few of the carbon frames in the Chinese
booths at Interbike this year. I wish I knew if they were worthwhile in
terms of durability. Stiffness and performance in that area seems a bit of a
stretch (marketing), but there may be one point worth considering. I have
had some problems with rear wheels shifting in titanium dropouts under hard
loads. The dropouts were smooth without any kind of grip surface. I have
never had slippage with an aluminum rear dropout, I assume because the
skewer can "bite" into the softer aluminum material. I would imagine that
the carbon dropouts may work about like the aluminum in that respect.

Bruce
 
S

Scott Gordo

Guest
On Dec 20, 7:22 pm, "Bruce Gilbert" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "Scott Gordo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...>Found this sorta interesting:
>
> http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=/photos/2007/tech/probikes/wel...
>
>
>
> > The article provides a rundown of Bart Wellens' Ridley cross bike.
> > It's has a carbon frame with titanium dropouts:

>
> > "Titanium dropouts are new on this year's bike. They're slightly
> > heavier than aluminum but stiffer and stronger. "

>
> > Not sure if aluminum is actually less stiff in this application
> > (likely forged and then cnc'd) than aluminum, but the titanium dropout
> > is likely stiffer than aluminum with a replaceable dropout bolted on.

>
> > Yep.

>
> > Scott

>
> I noticed carbon dropouts on a few of the carbon frames in the Chinese
> booths at Interbike this year. I wish I knew if they were worthwhile in
> terms of durability. Stiffness and performance in that area seems a bit ofa
> stretch (marketing), but there may be one point worth considering. I have
> had some problems with rear wheels shifting in titanium dropouts under hard
> loads. The dropouts were smooth without any kind of grip surface. I have
> never had slippage with an aluminum rear dropout, I assume because the
> skewer can "bite" into the softer aluminum material. I would imagine that
> the carbon dropouts may work about like the aluminum in that respect.
>
> Bruce


Do the carbon dropouts have a replaceable aluminum hanger bolted into
them?

I've got a titanium mtb which has experienced as much 'load' as my
220lb frame can muster. I haven't had an slippage.

/s
 
B

Bruce Gilbert

Guest
"Scott Gordo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
On Dec 20, 7:22 pm, "Bruce Gilbert" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "Scott Gordo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...>

Found this sorta interesting:
>
> http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=/photos/2007/tech/probikes/wel...
>
>
>
> > The article provides a rundown of Bart Wellens' Ridley cross bike.
> > It's has a carbon frame with titanium dropouts:

>
> > "Titanium dropouts are new on this year's bike. They're slightly
> > heavier than aluminum but stiffer and stronger. "

>
> > Not sure if aluminum is actually less stiff in this application
> > (likely forged and then cnc'd) than aluminum, but the titanium dropout
> > is likely stiffer than aluminum with a replaceable dropout bolted on.

>
> > Yep.

>
> > Scott

>
> I noticed carbon dropouts on a few of the carbon frames in the Chinese
> booths at Interbike this year. I wish I knew if they were worthwhile in
> terms of durability. Stiffness and performance in that area seems a bit of

a
> stretch (marketing), but there may be one point worth considering. I have
> had some problems with rear wheels shifting in titanium dropouts under

hard
> loads. The dropouts were smooth without any kind of grip surface. I have
> never had slippage with an aluminum rear dropout, I assume because the
> skewer can "bite" into the softer aluminum material. I would imagine that
> the carbon dropouts may work about like the aluminum in that respect.
>
> Bruce


Do the carbon dropouts have a replaceable aluminum hanger bolted into
them?

I've got a titanium mtb which has experienced as much 'load' as my
220lb frame can muster. I haven't had an slippage.

/s

It may be a function of the particular type of skewers used.

At the show, there were some frames with the replaceable hangers.

The other factor to consider, that we are talking about carbon bikes. As far
as I am concerned, it is not a matter of if the frame will break, it is a
matter of when. The OEM carbon manufacturers all want to offer a two year
warranty. Most say that if a frame is going to fail, it will happen in the
first year. Ehhh, maybe... but most bike dealers look for their high end
customers to buy a new bike every three years or so. The sales pattern in
the industry wipes out the problem anyway.

It is probably a matter of how much lead or melamine they can use in the
manufacturing process. Hey, how many kids or dogs get to chew on bike
frames? See, there really is no problem after all. :)

Bruce