To clip or not to clip?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Ben, Apr 3, 2003.

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  1. Ben

    Ben New Member

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    Bent riders,

    So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.

    Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.

    Thanks,
    Ben
     
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  2. On 4 Apr 2003 02:30:22 +0950, Ben <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So, do you use clips or clipless pedals?

    Speedplay X clipless.

    >I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was starting from a slight incline and my foot was
    >clipped into my pedal.

    Welcome to the club.

    >Share your wisdom with me.

    Practice makes perfect.

    -- Robert, 24" Vision Saber
     
  3. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was starting from a slight incline and my foot was
    clipped into my pedal. Ben,

    Good question!! To reduce startup problems,I have trained myself to do the following:

    1. Always unclip both sides at stops.
    2.Always down shift to lower gear at stops. 3 start up inclipped, with pedals under my arch.

    There is no denying that start up is harder on a bent. Allow for that with the new habits.

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone

    www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  4. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Bent riders,
    >
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.
    >
    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.

    I generally do not clip in until I am underway. The only 'events' that I have experienced have been
    after stopping and these have been few.

    I believe that some restraining device to keep the feet on the pedals is necessary for safety on a
    recumbent especially a SWB.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  5. I beat that one...I think I'm going into shock shortly. I just tried to ride up a garage ramp and
    2/3 of the way up one foot came off the pedal and when I hit the brakes to stop going backwards I
    turned the front wheels and came down the ramp with the bent sideways. I cannot go to emergency
    cause this SARS epidemic has shut down all the friggin hospitals. I am okay except about 4 x 2
    inches of skin peeled back from my wrist and it burns like hell...this one hand tying is cool.

    So far, took aspirin, washed area with cold water, covered area with polysporin, added large gauze
    pad and wrapped with adhesive tape. Anyone have any other advice for this...like Ice or Heat? can
    never remember which is better. Ironic that I did this on a tadpole after deciding 2 wheelers were
    too dangerous...given my chaotic riding style...seems I was wrong...ouch.
    -----------------------------------------------
    "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Bent riders,
    >
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.
    >
    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.
    >
    > Thanks, Ben
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  6. Kit Wolf

    Kit Wolf Guest

    On Fri, 04 Apr 2003 02:30:22 +0950, Ben wrote:

    > Bent riders,
    >
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.

    I used to do that even without clipless pedals. E.g. in front of a line of traffic, trying to
    start away when the lights changed. Funnily, I haven't had that sort of accident since going
    clipless, though.
    >
    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.

    People enjoy the pain of others. Think how many people's days you lightened - so long as your
    injuries are superficial.

    How long have you been riding; what do you ride, and what style pedals do you use?

    Kit

    > Thanks, Ben
     
  7. Skip

    Skip Guest

    I am a believer in clipless pedals for recumbents. (How does one clip into a clipless pedal?). What
    happened to you has surely happened to the rest of us at one time or another. We can only hope there
    were no witnesses. If not, then hopefully it was only a small gathering of people you don't know and
    will never see again.

    Clipless pedals keep your feet on the pedals which is important on a recumbent to avoid leg suck.
    That's when a foot comes off a pedal and hits the ground causing your leg to be sucked under the
    bike. You don't want that to ever happen to anybody.

    By the way, how is the cleat retention set on you pedals? I keep mine on the low side for an easy
    out in emergencies.

    skip

    skip "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bent riders,
    >
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.
    >
    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.
    >
    > Thanks, Ben
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  8. Rex Kerr

    Rex Kerr Guest

    Ben wrote:
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.

    Speedplay Frogs

    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.

    I've never fallen down due to clipless pedals, though I've had a few close calls. In emergency
    situations I've found that I unclip without even thinking about it. Last weekend I was riding along
    at about 20 MPH and enjoying the scenery (one problem with bents, looking around too much) and
    drifted off the side of the road! Somehow during the inevitable crash I managed to not only unclip,
    but end up standing in front of the bike... answered the big "what if..." question. :)
     
  9. Ben

    Ben New Member

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    Kit, and others,

    I didn't realize I'd become a member of such an elite club! Apparently, I need to be thankful it wasn't worse than it was.

    I'm just getting used to my new Burley Canto. I'm using Shimano SPD pedals; the one's with the clips on one side and the flat surface on the other side. I usually opt for versatility.

    I only scrapped and bruised my elbow. I was just beginning to push off with my left foot--up an incline--lost mometum and just laid down on my left side. I felt stupid, but my foot just would not come out of the clip.

    I'm going to follow all the advice. First, I'm going to adjust the clip. Second, I'm going to unclip both feet at every stop. Third, I will only reclip once I'm under way.

    But, from what you brothers are saying, it's nearly inevitable that it will happen again anyhow.

    Helmets all around!!!!!
    Ben



     
  10. >So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    >starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.

    I have "always" used toe clips and straps. People usually don't like them, perhaps they look
    old-fashioned or something... If the straps are set loose enough, you can get foot on the ground
    instantly to prevent falling.
     
  11. R2D2

    R2D2 New Member

    Joined:
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    There are huge advantages to clipping in. But...

    1. I keep the tension loose so that I can pull out during a panic. (multi-release cleats would help even more)

    2. I use high quality Shimano pedals because they are so smooth PD-M747. (Entry and exit)

    3. I use double-sided pedals to make clipping in easier.

    4. I always downshift (way down) when I come to a stop.

    5. I unclip both feet if conditions warrant.

    6. I always start up with one shoe clipped in (makes it easy to position crank too)

    I've panicked several times, but have always been able to pull out (lucky me). Keeping the tension loose enough is really the key.
     
  12. Geob

    Geob Guest

    >> So, do you use clips or clipless pedals?

    I use Lake mtn bike shoes with spd's on shimano 515 pedals.

    > I am a believer in clipless pedals for recumbents.

    I also.

    > What happened to you has surely happened to the rest of us at one time or another.

    Yes, it is still in the future for me but I am confident it is there.

    > Clipless pedals keep your feet on the pedals which is important on a recumbent to avoid leg suck.

    Last time it did that was on a Honda quad, in Baja, a 250R. I think I put a foot down, then ran over
    it with the rear wheel. Alls I know fer sure is that suddenly I wuz face down on the sand dune, the
    quad jumping up and down on top of me, my full-face helmet forced into dirt so far I had dirt pushed
    into my nose and mouth.

    > By the way, how is the cleat retention set on you pedals? I keep mine on the low side for an easy
    > out in emergencies.

    I wiped out about six months ago and my ankle acts like it will take a year or two to heal. I landed
    on it sideways at speed. The grass stains are still on the shoe. It was because my pedal came
    un-clipped on a corner at high speed and rpm. I hit a curb and went a$$ over teakettle. Now days I
    test my tension at LOW speed by trying to pull the shoe out. I have a trust issue, I know. I cranked
    up the tension on the pedals to give me a secure feeling. Next time when I go down and twist an
    ankle off I may regret this.

    > > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I
    > don't want to do that again if possible.

    Oh, it's always possible to do that again! :)

    My wisdom is like Robert Stevahn's... "Practice makes perfect."

    I just took it ever so carefully, practiced un-clipping and stopping (neuro-muscular training?)
    enough times that un-clipping became intrinsically linked with stopping.

    I spin purdy fast.. I wuz doing way over 100 rpm when I crashed. I gotta have the spds for
    confidence. Also it lowers fatigue by allowing my muscles to only worry about supplying motive
    force, I don't need to expend energy keeping my foot in the toe-clips as I used to do.
     
  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    skip wrote:
    > ... Clipless pedals keep your feet on the pedals which is important on a recumbent to avoid leg
    > suck. That's when a foot comes off a pedal and hits the ground causing your leg to be sucked under
    > the bike. You don't want that to ever happen to anybody....

    Even those who refuse to believe in the inherent moral goodness of free markets? ;)

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  14. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    Didn't hurt 1/10th as much as suffering a leg suck incident! I always unclipped both feet coming
    into a stop and took off unclipped though I was usually in after the first stroke. Now I ride a
    trike, never a problem! :)
     
  15. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > skip wrote:
    > > ... Clipless pedals keep your feet on the pedals which is important on a recumbent to avoid leg
    > > suck. That's when a foot comes off a pedal and hits the ground causing your leg to be sucked
    > > under the bike. You don't want that to ever happen to anybody....
    >
    > Even those who refuse to believe in the inherent moral goodness of free markets? ;)
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    Leg suck is a very ugly thing - so no exceptions.

    By the way when I was in school I was taught a free market was basically the sum total at any given
    time of the voluntary choices that families and individuals made by their voluntary cooperation and
    trade. The market has no personality, morality or immorality, goodness or badness. It is what it is
    at any point in time - the sum of voluntary choices of those voluntarily participating. They seem to
    be teaching something quite different these days.

    Surely you must treasure the freedom this country gives you to speak out on whatever it is you have
    chosen to refuse to believe.

    skip
     
  16. Baronn1

    Baronn1 Guest

    I learned to ride clipless mountain biking. My first pedals came with instructions that were
    photocopied so often, they were illegible. So...naturally, thinking I was setting tension at it's
    loosest (and having no patience), I set it at its tightest. LOTS of Arte Johnson tumbles on that
    first ride, usually as I caught up to the pack as they waited for stragglers. They made more stops
    that day, just to see the show, I'm sure. On a bent, I can't picture not being clipped in,
    especially for climbing. I unclip both to stop, but then clip on in while stopped, clip the other in
    after one or two spins when I take off.

    "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Bent riders,
    >
    > So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    > starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.
    >
    > Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.
    >
    > Thanks, Ben
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  17. Ron W

    Ron W Guest

    On 4 Apr 2003 02:30:22 +0950, Ben <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Bent riders,
    >
    >So, do you use clips or clipless pedals? I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was
    >starting from a slight incline and my foot was clipped into my pedal.
    >
    >Share your wisdom with me. That hurt (my ego too) and I don't want to do that again if possible.
    >
    >Thanks, Ben

    Does anyone in the group have experience with the POWER GRIP strap system??? I"m a new bent rider,
    and never thought about this leg suck thing. What situations seem to lend themselves to this
    accident? Thanx in advance. RON W
     
  18. St

    St Guest

    I am old enough to have used (survived) the straps, used as intended on my old DF. With a thick
    metal cleat on the shoe (or deep rubber ridge on the sole). The cleat had a transverse slot into
    which fit into the edge of the pedal. Then the strap was pulled tight to lock in. Releasing entailed
    whacking the buckle to the outside on the upstroke. Now that was excitement! So the new clipless
    pedals are absolutely wonderful.

    I mention this only to query why folks would bother to use the straps loose. Most of the advantages
    of firm attachment to the pedal are lost: ability to pull BACK while the opposite leg pushes forward
    (for me the most significant advantage), ability to spin and stay attached to the pedal, and not
    have the leg drop down (suck). Occasional ankling, and other muscle distributions/configurations are
    possible, to make for a much more efficient pedalling action.

    But simultaneously pulling back makes for makes for a much more efficient stroke, and markedly
    lessens the forces on the knees, especially on hills. Obviously, with fast spinning the forces are
    greatly decreased anyway.

    Sonny

    > I have "always" used toe clips and straps. People usually don't like them, perhaps they look
    > old-fashioned or something... If the straps are set loose enough, you can get foot on the ground
    > instantly to prevent falling.
     
  19. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Does anyone in the group have experience with the POWER GRIP strap system??? I"m a new bent rider,
    > and never thought about this leg suck thing. What situations seem to lend themselves to this
    > accident?

    In a pedaling situation where you are horizontal, it is possible for the foot to follow gravity down
    to the road below. Places likely to cause that are R/R tracks, Potholes and just being inattentive.
    SPDs and other pedal systems allow the foot to hang on the pedal while the leg is horizontal Power
    grips use a twisting motion to cinch the foot onto the pedal. Some have found this pinching of the
    foot uncomfortable others prefer them over pedal systems.

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  20. Gene Cosloy

    Gene Cosloy Guest

    "Tom Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just rolled my bent over yesterday because I was starting from a slight incline and my foot was
    > clipped into my pedal. Ben,
    >
    > Good question!! To reduce startup problems,I have trained myself to do the following:
    >
    > 1. Always unclip both sides at stops.
    > 2.Always down shift to lower gear at stops. 3 start up inclipped, with pedals under my arch.
    >
    > There is no denying that start up is harder on a bent. Allow for that with the new habits.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Miles of Smiles,
    >
    > Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone
    >
    > www.gate.net/~teblum

    Excellent advise Tom, I agree with your procedure, however I have one thing to add: Starting off
    unclipped, particularly through busy intersections is helped in my opinion by using a pedal that
    provides a large platform. Some of the clipless pedals have small slippery platforms that do not
    inspire confidence during this procedure. My favorite is the new Time Contol Z pedal (designed for
    downhill MTB fans), although the traditional rattrap one side with SPD and one side without work
    fine as well.

    Gene (BikeE NX, Burley Taiko )
     
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