To oil or not to oil?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Db, Jun 25, 2003.

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  1. Db

    Db Guest

    Hi

    In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and seriously considering running
    with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant. Figure it may cut down on the amount of crap that
    collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this? Any thoughts? Thanks

    Dennis
     
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  2. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    db wrote:

    > In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and seriously considering running
    > with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant.

    The sequaking will drive you, and those around you, crazy.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >> In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and seriously considering running
    >> with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant.
    >
    > The sequaking will drive you, and those around you, crazy.

    You'll also wear out your chain and freewheel very quickly, assuming it doesn't seize and
    self-destruct on its own.
     
  4. A shy Briton wrote:

    > In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and seriously considering running
    > with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant. Figure it may cut down on the amount of crap that
    > collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this? Any thoughts?

    I think you're on to something here! My car has been burning a lot of oil lately, making lots of
    blue smoke. The mechanic says I need an expensive ring job, but I think he's just greedy.

    Maybe I'll try your approach, just remove the sump plug and drain all of the oil out. That should
    stop the smoking...

    Carapace Completed Umber Riadh, Saudi Arabia
    +---------------------------------------------------------+
    | "Contrariwise," continued Tweedledee, "if it was so, | it might be, and if it were so, it would
    | be; | but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic!" | --Lewis Carroll, "Through the Looking Glass" |
    +---------------------------------------------------------+
     
  5. My car would burn load of oil if it got it.
     
  6. Pete Grey

    Pete Grey Guest

    I've been trying some new stuff over the past few years. Boeshield T-9 works pretty well in this
    regard. Been running it on my rain bike (it rains a lot here in Seattle) for two years now,
    forsaking my old standby of White Lightening that did squeak after 1-2 rain rides. No measurable
    chain-stretch in that period, and I typically put 5-6k miles on this bike every year. Chain stays
    really clean for a good long period (much cleaner than WL), with no re-application. Bummer is, that
    once it does get dirty (about 3-4 months), you must clean drive-train completely and re-apply. I
    tried wiping chain down and re-applying, what a mess!

    -pete

    "db" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi
    >
    > In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and
    seriously
    > considering running with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant.
    Figure
    > it may cut down on the amount of crap that collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this?
    > Any thoughts? Thanks
    >
    > Dennis
     
  7. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    > a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant. Figure it may cut down on the amount of crap that
    > collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this? Any thoughts?

    A wax-based lube like White Lightening will accomplish the essentially that and lubricate it pretty
    well. Needed a refresh after riding in the rain, but generally I liked it.
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  8. Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I think you're on to something here! My car has been burning a lot of oil lately, making lots of
    > blue smoke. The mechanic says I need an expensive ring job, but I think he's just greedy.
    >
    > Maybe I'll try your approach, just remove the sump plug and drain all of the oil out. That should
    > stop the smoking...
    >

    Is it a slant-six? If so go ahead, it'll be fine.

    dl
     
  9. Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:
    : A shy Briton wrote:
    :
    :> In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and seriously considering running
    :> with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant. Figure it may cut down on the amount of crap
    :> that collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this? Any thoughts?

    : I think you're on to something here! My car has been burning a lot of oil lately, making lots of
    : blue smoke. The mechanic says I need an expensive ring job, but I think he's just greedy.

    : Maybe I'll try your approach, just remove the sump plug and drain all of the oil out. That should
    : stop the smoking...

    Reminds me of the time - in another life - when a fellow bike mechanic thought that it would be a
    good idea to assemble a Honda 450 engine without oiling components as he proceeded. He didn't like
    all that smoke when they first started up. Me either.

    But the smoke is necessary, because the electric starter couldn't turn the engine over, nor could
    the kick starter get the damn thing to rotate even the slightest millimetre. The whole show was
    locked solid, and that was just from friction (????). This was a not a rebore, where extra drag is
    usually anticipated, just a reassembly.

    The only solution was to remove the spark plugs and squirt some engine oil in the bores - hey,
    that must be why it's called engine oil! We waited ten minutes or so for the oil to work its
    magic, replaced the plugs and voila!, when the smoke cleared the engine ran like a sewing
    machine on steroids. I can't imagine the rapid wear that took place on the cams while the oil
    pressure built up.

    The owner of the bike shop wasn't too happy and called the mechanic an idiot. He left a few weeks
    later because I don't think he was really cut out for that sort of work.

    Which brings me to the chain. It isn't a major life diverting activity to wipe a chain once a week
    or so - takes less than 5 minutes. Oil is good and necessary for metal to metal contact.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  10. Capt Bike-<< I think you're on to something here! My car has been burning a lot of oil lately,
    making lots of blue smoke. The mechanic says I need an expensive ring job, but I think he's just
    greedy. >><BR><BR>

    If my '73 VeeDub stops leaking oil, it means there isn't any left in there!!!

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  11. Db

    Db Guest

    OK

    My theory goes that you are running a hard metal (steel chain) against a soft alloy with a lubricant
    that with enough viscosity to prevent 'flying off' will also hold particles of road grit. Even with
    regular cleaning, the grit will collect again within a few days of riding and it acts as a very
    effective abrasive, hence my thoughts on running the chain dry. I have recently tried the wax
    ceramic type lubricants used on motorcycle chains and they appear to offer reasonable lubrication
    without holding onto as much road grit but, being intended for the sealed o-ring type motorcycle
    chain (and expensive) I wasn't too sure if I was just throwing good money away.

    Regards

    Dennis "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Capt Bike-<< I think you're on to something here! My car has been burning
    a
    > lot of oil lately, making lots of blue smoke. The mechanic says I need an expensive ring job, but
    > I think he's just greedy. >><BR><BR>
    >
    > If my '73 VeeDub stops leaking oil, it means there isn't any left in
    there!!!
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "db" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi
    >
    > In the process of re-building my road bike after a re-painting and
    seriously
    > considering running with a dry chain instead of the usual lubricant.
    Figure
    > it may cut down on the amount of crap that collects even with frequent cleaning. Anyone done this?
    > Any thoughts?

    Go with White Lightning. Wipe-down and reapply after rain rides (takes 2 minutes). It's not cheap;
    but it works very well and is quite convenient.

    I've heard that chainsaw bar oil mixed with a fast-drying solvent is the best bike chainlube; but
    you'll have to clean it often to keep the grit out.

    Chains are cheap. Buy several, and swap 'em when they start to stretch. Problem solved.

    Barry
     
  13. On Thu, 26 Jun 2003 16:27:17 +0100, "db" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My theory goes that you are running a hard metal (steel chain) against a soft alloy

    That would be hard metal against hard metal, namely steel chain parts against steel chain parts.
    Chain lubing isn't about the cog/chain interface.

    Jasper
     
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