Today, this morning.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin Blackburn, Jun 20, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in Glasgow on the Today programme
    this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit it in the gap between the house radio and the car
    radio. It seemed to have a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part of
    bike week?

    Colin
     
    Tags:


  2. Allan McVie

    Allan McVie Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >
    > Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in Glasgow on the Today programme
    > this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit it in the gap between the house radio and the car
    > radio. It seemed to have a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part of
    > bike week?
    >
    > Colin

    Could have been an item on the RAC survey they mentioned Glasgow when it came up on the BBC
    Breakfast program.

    Allan
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > >
    > > Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in Glasgow on the Today programme
    > > this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit it in the gap between the house radio and the car
    > > radio. It seemed to have a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part
    > > of bike week?
    > >
    > > Colin
    >
    > Could have been an item on the RAC survey they mentioned Glasgow when it came up on the BBC
    > Breakfast program.

    Cheers, that's it. I recognise the quote by the CTC rep which was at the end of the article.

    Colin
     
  4. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 09:28:43 +0100, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in Glasgow on the Today programme
    >this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit it in the gap between the house radio and the car
    >radio. It seemed to have a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part of
    >bike week?

    More stirling work by the Beeb this lunchtime. You & Yours featured a London cabbie whinging about
    cyclists who jump red lights etc. Sheesh. WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?

    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  5. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 12:20:00 +0100, Disgruntled Goat <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 09:28:43 +0100, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in Glasgow on the Today programme
    >>this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit it in the gap between the house radio and the car
    >>radio. It seemed to have a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part of
    >>bike week?
    >
    >More stirling work by the Beeb this lunchtime. You & Yours featured a London cabbie whinging about
    >cyclists who jump red lights etc. Sheesh. WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?

    Bike week or Cager's whining week, *this* is The Highway Code. Going through a red light is a
    traffic offence, it's just basic simple stuff I'm afraid. Now you know.

    Garry
     
  6. Pauline

    Pauline Guest

    "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Did anyone hear the article which seemed to be about cycling in
    Glasgow
    > > > on the Today programme this morning, around 7:30? They managed to fit
    it
    > > > in the gap between the house radio and the car radio. It seemed to
    have
    > > > a CTC rep on, was it about any particular cycling subject or just part of bike week?
    > > >
    > > > Colin
    > >
    > > Could have been an item on the RAC survey they mentioned Glasgow when it came up on the BBC
    > > Breakfast program.
    >
    > Cheers, that's it. I recognise the quote by the CTC rep which was at the end of the article.
    >
    > Colin

    Unfortunatly the CTC Scotland spokesperson was saying that it was OK for cyclist to jump red
    lights. This was playing straight into the hands of the RAC who were the original instigators of
    the story with their demand for the police to concentrate cameras on traffic light jumpers instead
    of speeders.
     
  7. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Pauline <[email protected]> said:

    > Unfortunatly the CTC Scotland spokesperson was saying that it was OK for cyclist to jump
    > red lights.

    I thought he was cautious: by explaining that "some do it because they can" while others use the
    space just ahead of the stop line as a sort of ASL, he explicitly didn't either condone or condemn
    the latter practice. Quite why he was there at all puzzled me, after all what is a camera going to
    do to stop a numberplateless cyclist jumping a red if they want to?

    You and Your Whinges also had a cabbie on talking about the highway code. One wonders when cabbies
    became paragons of impeccable driving... Needless to say, he went off on one about cyclists and
    their naughty antics.

    > This was playing straight into the hands of the RAC who were the original instigators of the story
    > with their demand for the police to concentrate cameras on traffic light jumpers instead of
    > speeders.

    I don't really have a problem with extra enforcement of traffic light jumping, just as long as it's
    not too much at the expense of speeding. After all, the technology is fairly similar and shouldn't
    be too expensive. Round here, some combined speeding/light jumping cameras would be most welcome.

    Regards,

    -david
     
  8. Disgruntled Goat wrote:
    >
    > More stirling work by the Beeb this lunchtime. You & Yours featured a London cabbie whinging about
    > cyclists who jump red lights etc. Sheesh. WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?
    >
    >

    Black cab drivers seem to share a rather unpleasant
    psychosis with bus drivers, its probably something caused by diesel inhalation which damages the
    brain in a fundamental way. Both groups should IMHO be sent to death camps, did I say death camps?
    I meant driver training camps...
     
  9. "Garry Broad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Bike week or Cager's whining week, *this* is The Highway Code. Going through a red light is a
    > traffic offence, it's just basic simple stuff I'm afraid. Now you know.
    >

    Actually most people's motivation in complying with the law is more complex than 'it's the law'.
    People may follow the law because they believe that what the law is asking them to do is morally
    right, or because they believe that it is safer to do so, or because they fear the consequences of
    being caught if they don't, or because they want to set an example to others and not feel like a
    hypocrite when they criticise others who break the law in other ways etc. etc. I believe the
    criminal fraternity has an expression: "do the crime, do the time" - ie. don't do anything you are
    not willing to pay the penalty for if caught - it doesn't mean to them don't do it. Society sets its
    laws, people follow them or not as the case may be. I don't say people shouldn't follow the law,
    rather they should, but some laws are more important than others and most people probably do make
    choices based on considerations other than the mere fact of a law existing.

    Rich
     
  10. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 20:30:32 +0100, "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Garry Broad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> Bike week or Cager's whining week, *this* is The Highway Code. Going through a red light is a
    >> traffic offence, it's just basic simple stuff I'm afraid. Now you know.
    >>
    >
    >Actually most people's motivation in complying with the law is more complex than 'it's the law'.
    >People may follow the law because they believe that what the law is asking them to do is morally
    >right, or because they believe that it is safer to do so, or because they fear the consequences of
    >being caught if they don't, or because they want to set an example to others and not feel like a
    >hypocrite when they criticise others who break the law in other ways etc. etc. I believe the
    >criminal fraternity has an expression: "do the crime, do the time" - ie. don't do anything you are
    >not willing to pay the penalty for if caught - it doesn't mean to them don't do it.

    That's fine, if you're the only consequence of the crime. Doing a red light as a cyclist? Nah,
    irrelevant matey, no big deal, I'm doing 20 as I approach the light, nice speed that is, and I know
    there's nothing else around, so I go through it, no big deal, what's your problem'. But if a cager
    does it when you're passing a green light, and hits you? Different story eh? And he also knows
    there's nobody else around! That bastard cager did a red light!!!! Plenty of live wires here that
    would throw their arms up in a tantrum. Red light is a red light. Stones, greenhouses and all that
    crap. Some people just don't get it.

    Garry

    >Society sets its laws, people follow them or not as the case may be. I don't say people shouldn't
    >follow the law, rather they should, but some laws are more important than others and most people
    >probably do make choices based on considerations other than the mere fact of a law existing.
    >
    >Rich
     
  11. "Garry Broad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > That's fine, if you're the only consequence of the crime. Doing a red light as a cyclist? Nah,
    > irrelevant matey, no big deal, I'm doing 20 as I approach the light, nice speed that is, and I
    > know there's nothing else around, so I go through it, no big deal, what's your problem'. But if a
    > cager does it when you're passing a green light, and hits you? Different story eh? And he also
    > knows there's nobody else around! That bastard cager did a red light!!!! Plenty of live wires here
    > that would throw their arms up in a tantrum. Red light is a red light. Stones, greenhouses and all
    > that crap. Some people just don't get it.
    >

    What you haven't got is that I was addressing your comment about people's motivation in following
    the law, not the rightness or wrongness of it. One of the motivations I mentioned was that some
    people follow it because they don't want to feel like a hypocrite when they criticise others who
    break the law - what you are complaining of here is hypocrisy. Personally I am less worried by
    hypocrisy than I am by road users of whatever variety who don't look _properly_ before they act.

    You also describe a scenario which is not typical of the manner in which most cyclists jump red
    lights, at least not what I have seen on my commute, which is to treat them like any other give way
    sign - approach with caution, stop if necessary and give way to anyone else with priority, and only
    proceed when it is safe to do so. In fact many cyclists approach green lights with the same degree
    of caution, particularly if they've only just turned green, and that is probably quite wise. As I
    said in reply to another poster, you can't rely on colour codes to tell you whether it is safe to
    go or not.

    Rich
     
  12. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 08:05:56 +0100, "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Garry Broad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> That's fine, if you're the only consequence of the crime. Doing a red light as a cyclist? Nah,
    >> irrelevant matey, no big deal, I'm doing 20 as I approach the light, nice speed that is, and I
    >> know there's nothing else around, so I go through it, no big deal, what's your problem'. But if a
    >> cager does it when you're passing a green light, and hits you? Different story eh? And he also
    >> knows there's nobody else around! That bastard cager did a red light!!!! Plenty of live wires
    >> here that would throw their arms up in a tantrum. Red light is a red light. Stones, greenhouses
    >> and all that crap. Some people just don't get it.
    >>
    >
    >What you haven't got is that I was addressing your comment about people's motivation in following
    >the law, not the rightness or wrongness of it. One of the motivations I mentioned was that some
    >people follow it because they don't want to feel like a hypocrite when they criticise others who
    >break the law - what you are complaining of here is hypocrisy. Personally I am less worried by
    >hypocrisy than I am by road users of whatever variety who don't look _properly_ before they act.

    So what you're saying is, it's all about observation. No complaints with that - that's basic road
    awareness. But doing it when you don't legally(according to traffic laws) have the right of way,
    increases the risk. What you're doing is rationalizing the ignoring of traffic laws when it suits
    you, which again, I can understand. As a cyclist I've done it myself - easing through a red when the
    coast is clear, or at least when I think it is. That's ok, until something happens, like something
    appearing on a 'blind spot', you've overlooked, then it's not so safe.

    Maybe it's no big deal, and it's perfectly ok to choose when we want to strictly obey traffic laws
    as cyclists, but it lets the cycling community down big time, and gives the 'cager' (whoever he or
    she may be) plenty to 'come back with' as a counter argument in the whole road safety issue. Then
    opinions get entrenched and it's stalemate all the way.

    At the end of the day, awareness is the key......but concentration can be difficult to sustain for
    long periods sometimes. Sometimes it's so easy to let the travelling take care of itself and allow
    the mind to wander elsewhere.

    Anyway, I have to go now, time to cycle up that damn hill to pick my car and gear up from a gig we
    did last night at a beer festival. It was a good gig and the beer was wonderful :)

    Garry
     
  13. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, David Nutter
    <[email protected]> writes

    >One wonders when cabbies became paragons of impeccable driving... Needless to say, he went off on
    >one about cyclists and their naughty antics.

    After several near misses in London I'm especially attentive round taxi drivers 'cos more often than
    not when they spot a potential fare beckoning from the pavement they swing left without checking to
    see that it's clear to do so. They also do it when they're about to drop passengers off but aren't
    sure exactly which shop front or door to stop outside.

    --
    congokid Eating out in London? Read my tips... http://congokid.com
     
  14. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 13:37:24 +0100, Garry Broad <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 12:20:00 +0100, Disgruntled Goat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>More stirling work by the Beeb this lunchtime. You & Yours featured a London cabbie whinging about
    >>cyclists who jump red lights etc. Sheesh. WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?
    >
    >Bike week or Cager's whining week, *this* is The Highway Code.

    And?

    >Going through a red light is a traffic offence, it's just basic simple stuff I'm afraid. Now
    >you know.

    I knew before, but thank you for stating the bleeding obvious. My point is that a London cabbie
    ranting about cyclists breaking the highway code is somewhat akin to Charlie Manson complaining
    about the amount of violence in society.

    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  15. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 17:40:18 +0100, Daniel Wilcox <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Disgruntled Goat wrote:
    >>
    >> More stirling work by the Beeb this lunchtime. You & Yours featured a London cabbie whinging
    >> about cyclists who jump red lights etc. Sheesh. WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Black cab drivers seem to share a rather unpleasant
    >psychosis with bus drivers, its probably something caused by diesel inhalation which damages the
    > brain in a fundamental way.

    :)

    > Both groups should IMHO be sent to death camps, did I say death camps? I meant driver training
    > camps...

    Located on Salisbury Plain. But first, we need to "decontaminate" them...
    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  16. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 12:20:00 +0100, Disgruntled Goat <[email protected]> wrote:

    >WTF is this? Bike Week or Cagers Whining Week?

    EVERY week is Cagers Whining Week - see uk.tosspot for details.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...