Todays Ride

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by David Waters, Oct 10, 2004.

  1. David Waters

    David Waters Guest

    All told a pretty miserable one today. Road out towards Buxton from
    Manchester. The first 10miles or so is along the A6 and is virtually ALL
    uphill. Today there was a strong headwind the whole way. Turned off the
    A6 at High Lane up 2 massive hills, again with a fierce headwind. The
    first major decent crosses over an A road (Possible the A6 again) and as
    such I am always wary on the brakes. The rear brake block failed the
    test and disintegrated miserably. I didn't fancy riding around with only
    front brakes so I bailed and rode home. To make matters worse, I had
    misadjusted the saddle and didnt have the correct tools with me and so
    suffered some rather unpleasent chafage. Hopefully next week will be
    more fun. :(
     
    Tags:


  2. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Waters wrote:
    > All told a pretty miserable one today. Road out towards Buxton from
    > Manchester. The first 10miles or so is along the A6 and is virtually ALL
    > uphill. Today there was a strong headwind the whole way. Turned off the
    > A6 at High Lane up 2 massive hills, again with a fierce headwind. The
    > first major decent crosses over an A road (Possible the A6 again) and as
    > such I am always wary on the brakes. The rear brake block failed the
    > test and disintegrated miserably. I didn't fancy riding around with only
    > front brakes so I bailed and rode home. To make matters worse, I had
    > misadjusted the saddle and didnt have the correct tools with me and so
    > suffered some rather unpleasent chafage. Hopefully next week will be
    > more fun. :(



    Follow Sheldon's guide to braking and you won't need more than the front
    brake except for convenience.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html

    Tony
     
  3. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:

    >
    > Follow Sheldon's guide to braking and you won't need more than the front
    > brake except for convenience.


    erm....and safety. I certainly wouldn't want to ride too far with only a
    front brake (assuming a freewheel).

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, David Waters
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > All told a pretty miserable one today.

    [snip]
    > Hopefully next week will be more fun. :(


    Oh, well, I can gloat a little then. Out of bed at 7:45 and not feeling
    like it at all. Out of the house at twenty past eight without even
    having got a sip of my morning coffee. Drive to Newton Stewart, knowing
    I was going to be late for the nine o'clock start. Got there, found to
    my relief people had waited, waited around a bit more, got on the road,
    leaving our strongest rider behind to bring on the stragglers.

    Officially we were supposed to be going slowly to allow stragglers to
    catch up but I dropped off the back on the first hill, struggled to
    stay with the group on the second, and on the third realised that at
    that time in the morning without breakfast I didn't have the legs and
    there was no point burning them. So I eased back to a speed I knew _I_
    could do, in the expectation that those behind would catch up.

    And then I really started to enjoy it. We were up into the hills above
    Newton Stewart again, and they're serious hills - grey granite crags
    going up precipitously above woodland autumn painted in golds and
    russets and tans, with burns and waterfalls cascading down; and the
    weather was struggling to be pleasant. I knew the route, so I rode on
    perfectly happily by myself for the next ten miles, enjoying the
    scenery and really just meditating. Then, in the carpark at the top,
    Janet (of our trusty LBS) was waiting with flasks of coffee and lots of
    chocolate cake. We got the message that some stragglers were following
    us and were feeling reasonably unhappy about having been left, so I
    cycled off down the hill to join up with them and bring them up to the
    carpark, where more cake was consumed.

    By then the weather was pretty much succeeding in being pleasant - the
    last tattered remnants of the front were clearing and the sun was
    pouring down out of a mainly clear blue sky, and it had even forgotten
    to be cold; so we headed off down the road again in a bunch. And just
    as it had been nice going up by myself, it was nice coming down in the
    group, chatting comfortably at 30mph and more - a startling difference
    from my outbound speed!

    Finally back into Newton Stewart and coffee in a friends house, 29.8
    miles on the trip in one hour 58 minutes riding time. Not fast, of
    course, but very enjoyable. I hope your next week's ride will be as
    good as mine.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; 'I think we should trust our president in every decision
    ;; that he makes and we should just support that'
    ;; Britney Spears of George W Bush, CNN 04:09:03
     
  5. congokid

    congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Simon
    Brooke <[email protected]> writes

    >Oh, well, I can gloat a little then. Out of bed at 7:45 and not feeling
    >like it at all. Out of the house at twenty past eight without even
    >having got a sip of my morning coffee.


    Not sure if this counts:
    - out of bed at 8.10am after late dinner party (with drinkies) across
    town last night that I didn't get home from until at least 1.30am
    - on bike at 8.30am
    - in swimming pool at 8.45am after 10 minute ride
    - 40 or so lengths later, in Caffe Nero with a hot cappuccino and a
    muffin in front of me.

    OK - not much cycling going on.

    --
    congokid
    Good restaurants in London? Number one on Google
    http://congokid.com
     
  6. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    > chatting comfortably at 30mph and more


    How'd you do that? I've never chatted comforably whilst descending at speed;
    I find riders need plenty of room between in such situations -- or is it
    just me?
     
  7. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Didn't ride today -- other than into town shopping. But yesterday I headed
    out to Stockbridge via Kings Somborne (NW of Winchester) and back along the
    same route as I knew I'd have the wind behind me all the way back, which was
    nice. I averaged about 41 kph for the 43 km back home!

    Should you ever find yourself in NW Hants, there's some great cycling
    country around there. The road from Winchester to Kings Somborne, Houghton
    and West Dean is the best (bumpy and picturesque) route to Salisbury and the
    West from the South East -- quieter in terms of motor traffic than the New
    Forest.
     
  8. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Follow Sheldon's guide to braking and you won't need more than the front
    > brake except for convenience.
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html


    His argument there assumes that you have a front brake powerful enough
    to lift the rear wheel by itself under heavy braking. Probably I've
    never ridden good enough bikes with good enough brakes, but I've never
    been able to do that. My Raleigh Pioneer, with clean rims and nicely
    adjusted brakes, stops much more quickly if I use the back brake as
    well.

    Daniele
    --
    Apple Juice Ltd
    Chapter Arts Centre
    Market Road www.apple-juice.co.uk
    Cardiff CF5 1QE 029 2019 0140
     
  9. Succorso

    Succorso Guest

    David Waters wrote:
    > All told a pretty miserable one today. Road out towards Buxton from
    > Manchester. The first 10miles or so is along the A6 and is virtually ALL
    > uphill. Today there was a strong headwind the whole way. Turned off the
    > A6 at High Lane up 2 massive hills, again with a fierce headwind. The
    > first major decent crosses over an A road (Possible the A6 again) and as
    > such I am always wary on the brakes. The rear brake block failed the
    > test and disintegrated miserably. I didn't fancy riding around with only
    > front brakes so I bailed and rode home. To make matters worse, I had
    > misadjusted the saddle and didnt have the correct tools with me and so
    > suffered some rather unpleasent chafage. Hopefully next week will be
    > more fun. :(


    Has been a tad blustery today; my first 30km today was into the wind -
    best I could do was 15kph at times, in 3rd gear :(. However, after the
    midpoint I found a new definition for a tailwind - 46kph on the computer
    and no wind noise around the ears - I was *flying* :)

    Anyway, clocked up another 60km - it was good to see several other
    cyclists out and about too; and all but one said "Good Morning" :)

    --
    Chris
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Simonb
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    >> chatting comfortably at 30mph and more

    >
    > How'd you do that? I've never chatted comforably whilst descending at
    > speed; I find riders need plenty of room between in such situations --
    > or is it just me?


    Well personally I'm quite new to riding in a bunch and it still makes me
    pretty nervous to be close to another bike at that sort of speed. But
    this morning it genuinely felt OK. Obviously at that speed voices are
    raised a bit, but... like I say, it worked and it felt OK. A slight
    following wind (about 8mph) may have helped by reducing the apparent
    head wind, and thus reducing the NEED TO SHOUT.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    .::;===r==\
    / /___||___\____
    //==\- ||- | /__\( MS Windows IS an operating environment.
    //____\__||___|_// \|: C++ IS an object oriented programming language.
    \__/ ~~~~~~~~~ \__/ Citroen 2cv6 IS a four door family saloon.
     
  11. congokid

    congokid Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Simon
    Brooke <[email protected]> writes
    >[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    > .::;===r==\
    > / /___||___\____
    > //==\- ||- | /__\( MS Windows IS an operating environment.
    > //____\__||___|_// \|: C++ IS an object oriented programming language.
    > \__/ ~~~~~~~~~ \__/ Citroen 2cv6 IS a four door family saloon.


    Viewed on my screen with Arial, regular, 10pt, it looks either like your
    car has crashed - or MS Windows has.

    --
    congokid
    Good restaurants in London? Number one on Google
    http://congokid.com
     
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 10/10/04 5:49 pm, in article [email protected],
    "congokid" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In message <[email protected]>, Simon
    > Brooke <[email protected]> writes
    >> [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >> .::;===r==\
    >> / /___||___\____
    >> //==\- ||- | /__\( MS Windows IS an operating environment.
    >> //____\__||___|_// \|: C++ IS an object oriented programming language.
    >> \__/ ~~~~~~~~~ \__/ Citroen 2cv6 IS a four door family saloon.

    >
    > Viewed on my screen with Arial, regular, 10pt, it looks either like your
    > car has crashed - or MS Windows has.


    Amateur.. All real net geeks only use fixed width fonts and 80 column
    terminals..

    Backwards compatible all the way to the jaquard loom..

    ...d
     
  13. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > Amateur.. All real net geeks only use fixed width fonts and 80 column
    > terminals..


    That's a shame. Sans-serif fonts are so much easier to read than fixed
    width. Can't they upgrade? ;-)
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 10/10/04 6:50 pm, in article [email protected],
    "Simonb" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > David Martin wrote:
    >
    >> Amateur.. All real net geeks only use fixed width fonts and 80 column
    >> terminals..

    >
    > That's a shame. Sans-serif fonts are so much easier to read than fixed
    > width. Can't they upgrade? ;-)


    San-serif and fixed width are not mutually exclusive. At the moment my
    screen has san-serif fonts in a fixed width. (Monaco 9 point notional)

    San-serif is literally 'without serifs' or the little flicks at the end of
    strokes that make typeset body text easier to read.

    In general one would use sanserif for headlines and titles, and serif for
    body text.

    Fixed width is a fixed spacing per character, like a typewriter or computer
    terminal. The opposite to fixed width is proportional spacing where each
    letter has an appropriate width.

    ...d
     
  15. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    D.M. Procida [email protected] opined the
    following...
    > His argument there assumes that you have a front brake powerful enough
    > to lift the rear wheel by itself under heavy braking. Probably I've
    > never ridden good enough bikes with good enough brakes, but I've never
    > been able to do that. My Raleigh Pioneer, with clean rims and nicely
    > adjusted brakes, stops much more quickly if I use the back brake as
    > well.


    Now would thus be a good time to invest in some new brakes!

    If you have side-pulls, consider upgrading to dual pivots. If you have
    cantilevers, consider V-Brakes.

    Jon
     
  16. On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 17:02:47 +0100,
    [email protected] (D.M. Procida) wrote in
    message
    <1glg1j2.xwzcoy13pjlfgN%[email protected]>:

    >His argument there assumes that you have a front brake powerful enough
    >to lift the rear wheel by itself under heavy braking. Probably I've
    >never ridden good enough bikes with good enough brakes, but I've never
    >been able to do that. My Raleigh Pioneer, with clean rims and nicely
    >adjusted brakes, stops much more quickly if I use the back brake as
    >well.


    Are you sure? Or is it just that you are subconsciously nervous about
    doing an endo so find yourself unwilling to apply full welly to the
    front brake?

    The last bike I had that absolutely could not lift the back wheel was
    an old Raleigh with pressed steel sidepulls. OK, that's not quite
    true - I haven't managed to lift the rear wheel on the recumbent.
    Maybe the Dark Side is calling? ;-)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  17. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > In general one would use sanserif for headlines and titles, and serif
    > for body text.


    That only holds true for printing. At screen resolution, you con get away
    with sans serif in body text most of the time (unless you are onr of those
    designers whose choice in point size is ridiculously small).
     
  18. David Waters wrote:
    > All told a pretty miserable one today. Road out towards Buxton from
    > Manchester. The first 10miles or so is along the A6 and is virtually
    > ALL uphill. Today there was a strong headwind the whole way. Turned
    > off the A6 at High Lane up 2 massive hills, again with a fierce
    > headwind. The first major decent crosses over an A road (Possible the
    > A6 again) and as such I am always wary on the brakes. The rear brake
    > block failed the test and disintegrated miserably. I didn't fancy
    > riding around with only front brakes so I bailed and rode home. To
    > make matters worse, I had misadjusted the saddle and didnt have the
    > correct tools with me and so suffered some rather unpleasent chafage.
    > Hopefully next week will be more fun. :(


    Too bad, sometimes one has bad rides. I didn't today. Up at 06:45 which is
    earlier than I do on a school day, cycled down to Leeds station at 07:30 to
    catch the Dales bike bus to Grassington. Started riding again at 10:18 and
    had a good tootle up Littondale, this really is a super road. There are only
    a few hamlets on the way so there is very little traffic. The road doubles
    back on itself as it climbs and gives superb views from whence one came. The
    climb is 17% in places but short. The road leads down into Settle. From
    there I cut south towards the Lancashire mill towns of Colne, Nelson (home
    of Carradice) and Burnley before turning east to come back into Yorkshire.
    As I entered Gods Oen County as the locals say the sun came out so the
    strong headwind was less cool. At Hebden Bridge I elected to turn right and
    head back into Lancashire to Littleborough and climb back on the Roman Road
    to Ripponden. The wind was at its strongest here, that, the miles in my legs
    and the incline made this climb pretty tough (its the A58). The descent is
    usually superb but with the strong headwind was crap. Once lower the wind
    was easier and I had no problems getting home. Total mileage 100.49 - I took
    the 'scenic' route through Morley to clock up the century. Time was 8 hours
    5 minutes including all stops for ravataillement, map reading and calls of
    nature.
     
  19. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Martin Newstead (MSeries) wrote:

    > the Dales bike bus


    What's this and where does it go from?
     
  20. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    Simonb wrote:
    >
    > Didn't ride today -- other than into town shopping. But yesterday I headed
    > out to Stockbridge via Kings Somborne (NW of Winchester) and back along the
    > same route as I knew I'd have the wind behind me all the way back, which was
    > nice. I averaged about 41 kph for the 43 km back home!


    I went out to Stockbridge yesterday - going down the Test valley from
    the north. Of course the real reason was to visit John Robinsons for a
    supply of sausages :)

    This morning I had a 19-year old for cycle-training for a couple of
    hours so mileage was low. My daughter then took him for an afternoon a
    ride up to Popham Airfield - an excellent Sunday stop for tea and cakes,
    while I cooked the bangers.

    > Should you ever find yourself in NW Hants, there's some great cycling
    > country around there.


    Yep - I look out my window at it every day :)

    John B
     
Loading...
Loading...