Toe clips vs Power Grips for ease-of-release on road bike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by streetwaves, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. streetwaves

    streetwaves New Member

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    Which one of these is the easiest to get out of FAST? It seems like toe clips and PGs would be easier than clipless since they both can be set loose enough that simply pulling back will get you out of them. I tried Shimano 105 SPD pedals this week and really don't like them. First rides went just fine until I decided I needed to test whether I could get out fast, under pressure, with no real time to prepare for the stop. The answer was no. I was only able to get unclipped at the bottom of the stroke, and that's too much to worry about in situations where I may need to get off immediately. They were set to the easiest tension. Toe clips or PGs seem to make more sense to me, so I was wondering which one would be better? I also don't like wearing special shoes, and since I do a mixture of fitness riding and plain old commuting and riding around, clipless just seems like a pain in the ass.
     
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  2. ccallana

    ccallana New Member

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    I've never ridden Power Grips, but for my bike that I want to use regular shoes with, Toe Clips have always been my choice. I like the extra platform under the front of my foot to push on :)
     
  3. AlanG

    AlanG Member

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    For your riding maybe consider just the plastic half toe clips that don't have straps at all. I usually ride with SPDs but also ride a quite a lot with the half clips and they do fine for the riding you are talking about with regular shoes. They position your foot, give some resistance on the upstroke, and are super easy to get into and out of. They cost very little too.
     
  4. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    With practice you can get out of clipless pedals like your SPDs in a heartbeat and no you don't have to wait for the bottom of the stroke you just have to twist your ankle outward. We do it all the time while off road riding on mountain or cyclocross bikes and in no time it becomes automatic to get out of the pedal and dab a foot when the bike is sliding out on loose or wet terrain without any time to think or plan.

    FWIW, I'd either go with a decent clipless pedal or I'd just run platform pedals with no cages and no power straps. I ran clips and straps for years and ran an early version of neoprene power straps back when mountain bikes first came out in the '80s and there's no way I can get out of either of those as quickly as I can twist an ankle to dab a foot. Just the bit of friction from the pedal surface combined with a toe clip or stretchy strap makes it slower to pull out than just twisting an ankle.

    Keep practicing releasing from your SPDs and it will get much quicker and easier. If that's too limiting then go with either a full platform pedal or perhaps something like these: http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033468_-1___
    So you can run with the SPDs or just flip them over and run them as straight platform pedals.

    IME, the Crank Brother's Eggbeater and Candy style pedals are the easiest and quickest to get into or out of in a hurry and what I run for cyclocross racing and on my road bike through the wet winter months: http://bicycling.about.com/od/equipmentreviews/fr/Candy_Pedals.htm

    Good luck,
    -Dave

    P.S. If you decide to try the CrankBrother's pedals make sure you read the cleat instructions and mount them on the correct feet for quick and fast release. Basically the cleats are not symmetrical and depending on which foot you mount the cleat with the extra divot mark the release angle will change from 15 degrees or 20 degrees. You'll get out much quicker and with less heel swing if you choose the 15 degree release angle.
     
  5. streetwaves

    streetwaves New Member

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    Alan thanks for the suggestion! I was going to buy the MKS Stream pedals, which are small, so would I be able to attach something like that pretty easily? I have large feet but I dont think they're wide enough to be afraid of the small pedals. Dave, thanks for your help too. However, clipless still requires special shoes. Recessed cleats would be better obviously. I was having plenty of trouble getting out when not at the bottom of the stroke. It was too awkward of an angle to get unclipped anywhere but at the bottom.
     
  6. AlanG

    AlanG Member

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    Those are exactly the kind of pedals half clips are made for. There are different brands and some brands offer different sizes depending on your foot size and the kind of shoes/boots you use. There are plastic ones and metal ones. After you get your pedals, go to a store that has a few sizes and see what you think will work.

    Here is a link to some reviews (not that I have any reason to recommend this brand.)

    http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Bicycle-Strapless-Toe-Clips/dp/B000FSQQMS/ref=acc_glance_sg_ai_ps_t2_t_1
     
  7. streetwaves

    streetwaves New Member

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    Thanks again for your help Alan. I've decided to either go with the option you gave me, which seems pretty great for urban commuting and such; or I'm toying with the idea of the Forte Campus pedals and some good MTB shoes and multi-directional release SPD cleats. Both options let me either use my regular shoes, or at least cycling shoes that can be walked on. Sounds better already!
     
  8. AlanG

    AlanG Member

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    That's a coincidence because my cyclocross bike has those campus pedals and I use MTB shoes on it. If you set those pedals to the lowest release setting, you should be able to release easily. The half clips will work on those pedals too but you will want to remove them to use the SPD side.
     
  9. ProdigalCyclist

    ProdigalCyclist New Member

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    If you have the straps on toe clips set loose enough to just be able to pull out of them, there's no point in even using them.

    And Power Grips.... Are you kidding me? They still make those pieces of junk? Power grips wont be any easier to get out of then clipless.... on clipless you just turn your foot and you pop out... on Power Grips you have to turn your foot AND THEN pull your foot out.... AND hope the stitching and seams on your shoe don't get caught on the Power Grip as you pull out of it.

    Power Grips are garbage. I had them on my Mountain Bike for exactly one ride and they went in the trash.

    And toe clips (even with the straps loose) and Power Grips are MUCH more likely to retain your feet in the event of a crash which could very likely screw up your knees. I have never crashed with clipless pedals and had me feet stay in the pedals.
     
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