Tomato Sauce?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by What?, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. What?

    What? Guest

    Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based in the UK and am not
    exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates tomato sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a
    cooked and seasoned tomato sauce, such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?

    TIA.
     
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  2. Hal Laurent

    Hal Laurent Guest

    "what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based
    in
    > the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    tomato
    > sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a cooked and seasoned tomato
    sauce,
    > such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?

    It means a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce.

    Hal Laurent Baltimore
     
  3. x-no-archive: yes

    Hal Laurent wrote:

    >
    >"what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based
    >in
    >> the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    >tomato
    >> sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a cooked and seasoned tomato
    >sauce,
    >> such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    >
    >It means a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce.
    >

    Oh, not necessarily, I think! There's a product you find on the shelves called "tomato sauce" which
    is not exactly the same as puree-- it's more concentrated-- but it's not seasoned unless it's
    specially labeled. If I were following a recipe that called for "tomato sauce" I would go for the
    unseasoned product.

    Naomi D.
     
  4. Hal Laurent

    Hal Laurent Guest

    "Naomi Darvell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > Hal Laurent wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >> Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm
    based
    > >in
    > >> the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    > >tomato
    > >> sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a cooked and seasoned tomato
    > >sauce,
    > >> such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    > >
    > >It means a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce.
    > >
    >
    > Oh, not necessarily, I think! There's a product you find on the shelves
    called
    > "tomato sauce" which is not exactly the same as puree-- it's more concentrated-- but it's not
    > seasoned unless it's specially labeled.

    Sounds like you're talking about tomato paste. Not the same thing at all as tomato sauce.

    Hal Laurent Baltimore
     
  5. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    > (Naomi Darvell) erroneously states:
    >
    >Oh, not necessarily, I think! There's a product you find on the shelves called "tomato sauce" which
    >is not exactly the same as puree-- it's more concentrated-- but it's not seasoned unless it's
    >specially labeled. If I were following a recipe that called for "tomato sauce" I would go for the
    >unseasoned product.

    Canned "Tomato Sauce" (in the US) is a seasoned tomato product, which is why it's called "Sauce"...
    read the label.

    Canned tomato products labeled Puree, Crushed, Whole, Paste, etc. are not seasoned (except those
    that state they contain herbs- usually basil)... where the word "Sauce" appears it's seasoned. Some
    canned tomato products state they contain 'no added salt' but they still contain salt, all food
    naturally contains salt.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  6. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 20:11:04 -0500, "Hal Laurent"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based
    >in
    >> the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    >tomato
    >> sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a cooked and seasoned tomato
    >sauce,
    >> such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    >
    >It means a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce.

    That would be spaghetti sauce. Tomato sauce is usually just cooked strained/pureed tomatoes, salt,
    and citric acid - unless it's advertised as being adulterated with other spices.

    -sw
     
  7. x-no-archive: yes

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    >> (Naomi Darvell) erroneously states:
    >>
    >>Oh, not necessarily, I think! There's a product you find on the shelves called "tomato sauce"
    >>which is not exactly the same as puree-- it's more concentrated-- but it's not seasoned unless
    >>it's specially labeled. If I
    >were
    >>following a recipe that called for "tomato sauce" I would go for the unseasoned product.
    >
    >Canned "Tomato Sauce" (in the US) is a seasoned tomato product, which is why it's called "Sauce"...
    >read the label.
    >
    >Canned tomato products labeled Puree, Crushed, Whole, Paste, etc. are not seasoned (except those
    >that state they contain herbs- usually basil)... where the word "Sauce" appears it's seasoned. Some
    >canned tomato products state they contain 'no added salt' but they still contain salt, all food
    >naturally contains salt.

    What is that thing I find on the supermarket shelf labeled "Tomato Sauce"? It commonly comes in 8-oz
    cans from companies such as Hunts. It contains nothing other than tomatoes, tomato concentrate,
    whatever, and perhaps salt.

    Naomi D.
     
  8. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 27 Jan 2004 02:13:01 GMT, [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

    >Canned "Tomato Sauce" (in the US) is a seasoned tomato product, which is why it's called "Sauce"...
    >read the label.

    "Tomato pureee, water, salt, citric acid, tomato fiber, natural flavor".

    -sw
     
  9. Drb

    Drb Guest

    "Naomi Darvell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > No, I regularly buy tomato paste. It's not the same as tomato sauce. I'm talking about products by
    > companies like Hunt and Contadina which are
    labeled
    > tomato sauce.
    >
    >
    http://www.hunts.com/gateway?waf.action=Hunts&page_name=P01Products&categoryID=0&mnav=products

    Is the url to Hunts product listing. It appears that tomato sauce, while not as flavored as
    spaghetti sauce, does have some seasoning to it. It sounds a lot like ketchup to me. They have a
    tomato puree that they describe as having "a texture between tomato paste and crushed tomatoes."
    Then, they have the regular tomato paste, which is concentrated, strained tomatoes.
     
  10. Fran

    Fran Guest

    "what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based
    in
    > the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    tomato
    > sauce.

    Could you give an example of the recipe that includes a mention of tomato sauce?

    Given that it doesn't seem to be an open and shut definition that is immediatley obvious to other
    posters then the recipe may help people to figure out what this ingredient really is.
     
  11. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 27 Jan 2004 03:05:53 GMT, [email protected] (Naomi Darvell) wrote:

    >FYI-- Hunt's Tomato Sauce:
    >
    >http://www.hunts.com/A02-FAQ.jsp?mnav=about

    Aw, now you've taken the fun out. :)

    We certainly have a lot of choices: whole, diced, crushed, stewed, puree, juice, sauce, paste. Not
    to mention the 'flavored' variations.
     
  12. Themom1

    Themom1 Guest

    Cooked and seasoned sauce, but not necessarily spaghetti sauce.

    --
    Helen

    Thanks be unto God for His wonderful gift: Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God is the object
    of our faith; the only faith that saves is faith in Him

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    225/188.4/145

    "what?" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based
    in
    > the UK and am not exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates
    tomato
    > sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or a cooked and seasoned tomato
    sauce,
    > such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    >
    > TIA.
     
  13. stan

    stan Guest

    what? <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based in the UK and am not
    > exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates tomato sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or
    > a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce, such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?

    Tomato sauce in the United States is typically a marinara type sauce. If you have a specific
    recipe in mind, post the recipe then we can say for sure what type of tomato sauce would be
    appropriate for it.
     
  14. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    what? wrote:
    >
    > Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based in the UK and am not
    > exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates tomato sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or
    > a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce, such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    >
    > TIA.

    It's generally meant to be either a finished seasoned sauce or occasionally the equivalent of a
    passata. It's not normally used to mean the stuff that goes on bangers or chips, as in Heinz.
     
  15. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 27 Jan 2004 14:47:12 GMT, [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

    >> Sqwertz fabricates:
    >>
    >>(PENMART01) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Canned "Tomato Sauce" (in the US) is a seasoned tomato product, which is why it's called
    >>>"Sauce"... read the label.
    >>
    >>"Tomato puree'e, water, salt, citric acid, tomato fiber, natural flavor".
    >
    >Anyone with a can of tomato sauce and who can read will know you're a liar.

    Don't you ever get tired of being wrong? I figured you'd be used to it by now, but you keep coming
    back for more.

    That was from a can of HEB brand tomato sauce.

    Some brands may indeed have some "spices" in them, THE USDA even says they can, but a very minute
    amount not even *identifiable* in the end product. And certainly not fit for use as a spagetti sauce
    without additional adulteration.

    -sw
     
  16. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 00:38:11 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >what? <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Hi, I notice that many American recipes call for tomato sauce. I'm based in the UK and am not
    >> exactly sure what a recipe means when it stipulates tomato sauce. Does it mean pureed tomatoes or
    >> a cooked and seasoned tomato sauce, such as you would use in an Italian tomato sauce?
    >
    >Tomato sauce in the United States is typically a marinara type sauce. If you have a specific
    >recipe in mind, post the recipe then we can say for sure what type of tomato sauce would be
    >appropriate for it.

    Wrong. Tomato sauce in an American recipe is what comes in cans labeled 'tomato sauce'. The URL
    posted the other day

    http://www.hunts.com/A02-FAQ.jsp?mnav=about

    shows that plain 'sauce' is roughly equivalent to 'puree', a diluted form of 'paste', or a
    concentrated 'juice'.

    I realize that marinara means 'tomato,' so strictly speaking, marinara sauce and tomato sauce are
    the same thing, but usually 'marinara' refers to a complete seasoned and cooked sauce, to be put
    over pasta or meat, while 'tomato sauce' means liquidized tomatoes with salt and perhaps a teeny bit
    of other seasonings to be used as a recipe *ingredient*.

    Jarred or canned 'pasta sauces' (oddly not made from pasta :). are meant to be used as-is and are
    thoroughly cooked and seasoned.
     
  17. Ken Davey

    Ken Davey Guest

    PENMART01 wrote:
    > Frogputz
    >
    > Stan is correct, and you, Frogputz, are a most ignorant bastard...
    >
    > go stand in the "Hopeless Morons" line with Sqwertz, both of yoose share the same DNA, means yoose
    > both have the same 25ยข whoring momma, but different imbecile poppas, unknown marinaras naturally.
    >
    > Ahahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .
    >
    Off your meds again? plonk.
     
  18. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    DRB wrote:

    > Is the url to Hunts product listing. It appears that tomato sauce, while not as flavored as
    > spaghetti sauce, does have some seasoning to it. It sounds a lot like ketchup to me.

    Tomato sauce and ketchup are not alike. At all. And tomato sauce and spaghetti sauce aren't alike,
    either. Different altogether.

    nancy
     
  19. Stark Raven

    Stark Raven Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > DRB wrote:
    >
    > > Is the url to Hunts product listing. It appears that tomato sauce, while not as flavored as
    > > spaghetti sauce, does have some seasoning to it. It sounds a lot like ketchup to me.
    >
    > Tomato sauce and ketchup are not alike. At all. And tomato sauce and spaghetti sauce aren't alike,
    > either. Different altogether.
    >
    > nancy

    It's getting harder and harder to find simple whole, diced or pureed tomatos for all the Italian,
    Mexican, zesty and chili-flavored varieties on the shelves. Can sauce be far behind?
     
  20. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > DRB wrote:
    >
    > > Is the url to Hunts product listing. It appears that tomato sauce,
    while
    > > not as flavored as spaghetti sauce, does have some seasoning to it. It sounds a lot like ketchup
    > > to me.
    >
    > Tomato sauce and ketchup are not alike. At all. And tomato sauce and spaghetti sauce aren't alike,
    > either. Different altogether.
    >
    > nancy

    At home in England, ketchup was known as tomato sauce - perhaps it still is. I agree, though, tomato
    sauce here in the US is a different animal (no seasoning) from ketchup. BTW, I love Heinz' new
    ketchup. It's called "Zesty", or something and really sparks things up.

    Dora
     
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