Tonight will be my first night ride - any advise?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Lee, Oct 31, 2003.

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  1. Lee

    Lee Guest

    Hello!

    The clocks have gone back and Winter is nearly upon us. Tonight will be the first night I will be
    riding home in the dark - i have my cat eye lights all ready and willing to go - can anyone offer
    any advise on riding at night - 95% of my commute home is off road so advise geared ('scuse the pun)
    towards this would be appreciated!

    Ta

    Lee
     
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  2. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello!
    >
    > The clocks have gone back and Winter is nearly upon us. Tonight will be
    the
    > first night I will be riding home in the dark - i have my cat eye lights
    all
    > ready and willing to go - can anyone offer any advise on riding at night - 95% of my commute home
    > is off road so advise geared ('scuse the pun)
    towards
    > this would be appreciated!
    >
    > Ta
    >
    > Lee
    >
    >

    DOH! I meant advice every time i put advise - bloody computers and spellcheckers ;-)
     
  3. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Lee must be edykated coz e writed:

    > Hello!
    >
    > The clocks have gone back and Winter is nearly upon us. Tonight will be the first night I will be
    > riding home in the dark - i have my cat eye lights all ready and willing to go - can anyone offer
    > any advise on riding at night - 95% of my commute home is off road so advise geared ('scuse the
    > pun) towards this would be appreciated!
    >
    > Ta
    >
    > Lee
    >
    >
    Make sure you have a flashing rear light as well as a steady one and assume all car drivers are
    blind, place yourself further out into the road so you have more manoeuvring space than usual and
    keep a constant check all around you, avoid looking directly at on coming cars as it wrecks your
    vision, if you do happen to get caught by a full beam pervert then stop and allow your vision to
    clear before continuing. And watch out for giant bats.

    --
    Ian

    http://www.catrike.co.uk
     
  4. Lee

    Lee Guest

  5. Ian

    Ian Guest

  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello!
    >
    > The clocks have gone back and Winter is nearly upon us. Tonight will be
    the
    > first night I will be riding home in the dark - i have my cat eye lights
    all
    > ready and willing to go - can anyone offer any advise on riding at night - 95% of my commute home
    > is off road so advise geared ('scuse the pun)
    towards
    > this would be appreciated!

    Turn on all your lights. Point your front light so it lights you way. Get on bike. Pedal.

    That's it. You may find you cycle more slowly to compensate for the poorer visibility. Pedestrians
    on your route may be even more clueless than normal. However, if you have good rear lights (one
    flash, one steady as Ian suggests) you will probably find that motorists give you more room than
    they do in the daylight.

    T

    PS. Remember to put a spare set of batteries in your pack.
     
  7. Andyp

    Andyp Guest

    "Lee" wrote

    > The clocks have gone back and Winter is nearly upon us. Tonight will be
    the
    > first night I will be riding home in the dark - i have my cat eye lights
    all
    > ready and willing to go - can anyone offer any advise on riding at night - 95% of my commute home
    > is off road so advise geared ('scuse the pun)
    towards
    > this would be appreciated!

    If that's off road as in cycle path watch out for people approaching without lights. If it's off
    road as in paths through the woods, fields etc remember that every rustle or pair of reflected eyes
    is probably something out to kill you.
     
  8. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Turn on all your lights. Point your front light so it lights you way.
    Get
    > on bike. Pedal.
    >
    > That's it. You may find you cycle more slowly to compensate for the
    poorer
    > visibility. Pedestrians on your route may be even more clueless than normal. However, if you have
    > good rear lights (one flash, one steady as
    Ian
    > suggests) you will probably find that motorists give you more room than
    they
    > do in the daylight.
    >
    > T
    >
    > PS. Remember to put a spare set of batteries in your pack.
    >
    >

    Aye, fingers crossed I should be ok - I have all the necessary kit apart from a spare set of
    batteries - i can see a shopping trip coming on at dinner ;-)
     
  9. Lee

    Lee Guest

  10. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "AndyP" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > If that's off road as in cycle path watch out for people approaching
    without
    > lights. If it's off road as in paths through the woods, fields etc
    remember
    > that every rustle or pair of reflected eyes is probably something out to kill you.
    >
    >

    Its off road cycle paths - ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain ;-)

    And there is a small section of my commute actually in a secluded area - so that will be
    nice then ;-)
     
  11. "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BBC2909C.154E1%[email protected]...

    > Make sure you have a flashing rear light as well as a steady one and assume all car drivers are
    > blind....

    I think these "flashers" are a very annoying trend, but I guess better than no lights at all.
     
  12. "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain ;-)
    >

    Does that mean that Yogi bear is bouncing round inside your head?
    ___
    Michael MacClancy
     
  13. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Adrian Boliston wrote:

    > "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BBC2909C.154E1%[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>Make sure you have a flashing rear light as well as a steady one and assume all car drivers are
    >>blind....
    >
    >
    > I think these "flashers" are a very annoying trend, but I guess better than no lights at all.
    >
    >

    As a car driver, they're excellent for drawing your attention to something 'out of the ordinary'
    ahead. Flashing lights are used routinely in marking hazards - think cones, car hazards, etc. This
    tends to make the brain notice them more than a fixed light. They're worse when you try and judge
    distance to them, though - and being flashing it IS possible you'd miss them if you're rapidly
    checking mirrors etc.

    I always find cyclists easier to see in the dark when they have one steady one flashing light, front
    and back. If nothing else it clues me in immediately to the speed difference being great. Be aware
    though that oncoming lights can completely mask a cyclists lights, so high-vis clothing helps you to
    show up as more than just a brief glimpse of a silhouette!

    Velvet
     
  14. On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 11:33:04 -0000, Michael MacClancy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Lee" <[email protected]com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >>
    > ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain ;-)
    >>
    >
    > Does that mean that Yogi bear is bouncing round inside your head?

    Is Yogi sick? Better tell Booboo.

    Colin
     
  15. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Lee <[email protected]com> wrote:

    : Its off road cycle paths - ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain ;-)

    One particular is people walking dogs. They can be on one side of the path. Pooch on the other.
    Neither has lights. And pooch is on one of the long lead things.

    Result : one sore cyclist.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune [email protected]

    At home and on the phone.....
     
  16. On 27 Oct 2003 13:29:17 GMT, Arthur Clune <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lee <[email protected]com> wrote:
    >
    > : Its off road cycle paths - ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain
    > ;-)
    >
    > One particular is people walking dogs. They can be on one side of the path. Pooch on the other.

    I read that as "Pooh on the other." All we need now is Rupert and we can have a picnic. Pass the
    honey and lemon.

    Colin
     
  17. "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > As a car driver, they're excellent for drawing your attention to something 'out of the ordinary'
    > ahead. Flashing lights are used routinely in marking hazards - think cones, car hazards, etc.....

    Great! We're "hazards" now then!

    > I always find cyclists easier to see in the dark when they have one steady one flashing light,
    > front and back. If nothing else it clues me in immediately to the speed difference being
    > great.....

    Round town it's usually about 10mph differential in 30 zones (if that), so by this reckoning cars
    that do under 70 on a mway should have flashers to help drivers who are doing 80mph+
     
  18. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Lee"
    <[email protected]com>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > ill bear in mind not everyone has a brain ;-)
    > >
    >
    > Does that mean that Yogi bear is bouncing round inside your head?
    > ___
    > Michael MacClancy
    >
    >

    hey boo boo - not quite what i meant - to be honest my spellingz ave been atroshous twoday!
     
  19. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Adrian Boliston wrote:

    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>As a car driver, they're excellent for drawing your attention to something 'out of the ordinary'
    >>ahead. Flashing lights are used routinely in marking hazards - think cones, car hazards, etc.....
    >
    >
    > Great! We're "hazards" now then!
    >
    >

    That's not what I said - I just pointed out that flashign lights normally signal a hazard, which
    cues a driver into slowing down, making allowances for the unknown they're heading towards, the
    possibility they will have to change road positioning, etc etc, - all very handy things to have them
    already prepared to do if you're a cyclist!

    I was making the point that anything which makes a car driver *see* a cyclist, is a good thing, and
    that flashers are better at alerting them than fixed lights, IME.

    >>I always find cyclists easier to see in the dark when they have one steady one flashing light,
    >>front and back. If nothing else it clues me in immediately to the speed difference being
    >>great.....
    >
    >
    > Round town it's usually about 10mph differential in 30 zones (if that), so by this reckoning cars
    > that do under 70 on a mway should have flashers to help drivers who are doing 80mph+
    >
    >

    Round town cyclists are easier to spot with streetlights around. Out of town on unlit roads cyclists
    can be VERY hard to spot and closing speeds can be MUCH greater. Out of town, flashing you can see
    from further away, IME. In town, they're handy to be able to distinguish from lights on other
    vehicles (quite possible you could mistake a cyclist cycling along a row of parked cars as a rear
    light on stationary car, for example, but a regular flashign red light isn't normal on a car).

    I was just pointing out what I've found to be the case, and what I have (though I admit it's never
    been used) on the back of my bike. I'm not out for an argument on this, just trying to elaborate on
    why I personally feel a flashing rear red (and possibly front white) is a Good Thing, given you want
    maximum visibility at night on roads and to be seen early by as many drivers as possible.

    Velvet
     
  20. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 27 Oct 2003 13:29:17 GMT, Arthur Clune <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > One particular is people walking dogs. They can be on one side of the path. Pooch on the other.
    >
    > I read that as "Pooh on the other." All we need now is Rupert and we can have a picnic. Pass the
    > honey and lemon.

    Maybe not Pooh, but it's a fair bet that poo will on the path somewhere.

    --
    Dave...
     
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