Too late?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Heath, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Heath

    Heath New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18 considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier age?
     
    Tags:


  2. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:54:14 +1000, Heath
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    >considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    >age?


    Go out and ride hard for a year, and then come back and ask again and we'll
    have the answer for you.

    -B
     
  3. On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:54:14 +1000, Heath
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    >considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    >age?


    Cycling for what? My wife started aged 30 and now rides every day,
    including sometimes piloting a triplet with two kids on the back.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:54:14 +1000, Heath
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    >considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    >age?


    Yes, it's too late. By the time you reach 18, your muscles are set
    in their ways, and can't learn new tricks. You're stuck forever with
    a life of whatever you did when you were 17.

    Okay, really, it's fine. Maybe you could even become an elite racer
    like Fabrizio Mazzoleni.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. Bob in CT

    Bob in CT Guest

    On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 16:05:02 -0400, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:54:14 +1000, Heath
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    >> considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    >> age?

    >
    > Yes, it's too late. By the time you reach 18, your muscles are set
    > in their ways, and can't learn new tricks. You're stuck forever with
    > a life of whatever you did when you were 17.
    >
    > Okay, really, it's fine. Maybe you could even become an elite racer
    > like Fabrizio Mazzoleni.
    > --
    > Rick Onanian


    Now, if we were talking tennis...that's a different story.

    --
    Bob in CT
    Remove ".x" to reply
     
  6. Ben A Gozar

    Ben A Gozar Guest

    Most elitist people in any sport have a passion for thir sport that started
    as children. Perhaps you may wish to set your goals a little lower?
     
  7. Tyler

    Tyler Guest

    Ben A Gozar <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Most elitist people in any sport have a passion for thir sport that
    > started as children. Perhaps you may wish to set your goals a little
    > lower?


    There is a big difference between elite and elitist.
     
  8. On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 03:54:14 +1000, Heath
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    >considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    >age?


    As everybody will ask you--cycling for WHAT?

    I'm 23. There are guys on this NG and in my town who are twice and
    three times my age who can ride me into the ground with sickening
    ease.

    Now, if you've got tour or olympic dreams, well, I couldn't tell you
    what "too late" means. There's a fellow who trialed for the U.S.
    Olympic Track Cycling team from my area who's in his mid-30s: rides
    Match Sprint and Kilometer, from what I remember.

    There are always races to ride in, if you want them.

    Advice: if what you want to do is race, well, get on your bike,
    train, and join your local racing club.

    If, however, what you want to do is ride a bike, well, ain't nobody
    gonna stop you.

    -Luigi
    (Not a racer, incidentally)
     
  9. Heath wrote:

    > Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    > considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    > age?


    It may depend how elite you want to be. (Personally, I was never
    motivated to be in the top 5%. Good thing, too.)

    It may also depend on what you've been doing instead, and on your genes.
    Couch potato whose parents died of heart ailments at 30? Sorry. But if
    you're a person who runs marathons while singing, you're in for lots of fun.


    Speaking of marathons: Back in the 1970s, I had a friend once who
    qualified for the Boston Marathon. He was at least 40. Anyway, our
    cycling got him interested, and he bought a very nice bike. He did one
    20 mile ride, one 30 mile ride, then he took part in a major
    invitational ride with a big city club. Hundreds of cyclists riding 100
    miles south one day, sleeping overnight on a gym floor, then 100 miles
    back north the next day. On the way back, he was hanging with a couple
    of really fast guys all the way - until they said "Well, we live over
    that way, so we're not going back to the finish. Just follow the arrows."

    He was the first guy to finish.


    So it all depends.

    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  10. Ben A Gozar

    Ben A Gozar Guest

    Brain fart....thank you
     
  11. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ben A Gozar <[email protected]> writes:
    > Most elitist people in any sport have a passion for thir sport that started
    > as children. Perhaps you may wish to set your goals a little lower?


    Or even dismiss or disregard goals in a Zen sort of way,
    and just ride as well as possible, for the sake and
    enjoyment of doing so. From that point, whatever happens,
    happens. Goals can be so limiting, and they can divert
    attention from good stuff we failed to consider.

    To the OP:
    You're 18 and wanting elite status, eh? A pretty good
    start on that road might well be doing a bike courier
    work for awhile. And maybe using a fixed-gear as your
    working bike. That's what I'd do if I fit those
    criteria, anyways.

    If local facilities are available, maybe get into track
    racing. I'm almost willing to bet dollars to donut-holes
    that track skills are more transferable to road racing,
    than the reverse. And I believe being well-rounded in
    skill is key to elitehood.

    But I'm no expert on elete-ness. My biggest race in
    awhile was last night, against a skunk who was keeping
    pace with me (I didn't know whether to try to outrun it,
    or fall back and let it get ahead of me.) So I'm not
    even elite when it comes to racing with the local fauna.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  12. S o r n i

    S o r n i Guest

    Ben A Gozar wrote:
    > Brain fart....thank you


    Quote fart....you're welcome

    Bill "sigh" S.
     
  13. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    >> Brain fart....thank you
    >Quote fart....you're welcome


    Man, it's starting to stink in here.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  14. "Heath" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    > considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    > age?


    I think Tyler Hamilton didn't start until college. Didn't he ruin his knees
    or something for skiing, so took up bicycling? But he had been doing other
    athletic events for a long time before.

    If you're a couch potato now, it's going to be hard. If you're already doing
    other things, especially those that involve good aerobic conditioning, you
    could give it a shot -- why not?


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  15. On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 23:50:46 +0000, Claire Petersky wrote:

    > "Heath" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age
    >> of 18 considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far
    >> earlier age?

    >
    > I think Tyler Hamilton didn't start until college. Didn't he ruin
    > his knees or something for skiing, so took up bicycling? But he had
    > been doing other athletic events for a long time before.
    >
    > If you're a couch potato now, it's going to be hard. If you're
    > already doing other things, especially those that involve good
    > aerobic conditioning, you could give it a shot -- why not?


    Carlos Lopes won the 1984 Olympic marathon at age 37, and was
    still running sub-28-minute track 10Ks at the time. I don't know
    when he burst onto the world class distance running scene, but he was
    still there well past the age that most athletes depart the scene.

    Ekimov (a Postie) is 38 years old and rode in the TdF this year,
    and will be riding next year, too. I don't know when he started
    either, but it was probably a bit later than Lance started.

    What is likely, I think, is that if you start your *serious*
    training later in life, you'll peak later in life. There are limits
    to this, of course (I doubt we'll see anyone start riding hard at age
    40 turn up in the TdF when they're 60), but there you go.

    --
    Chris BeHanna
    Software Engineer (Remove "allspammersmustdie" before responding.)
    [email protected]
    I was raised by a pack of wild corn dogs.
     
  16. Chris BeHanna <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ekimov (a Postie) is 38 years old and rode in the TdF this year,
    > and will be riding next year, too. I don't know when he started
    > either, but it was probably a bit later than Lance started.


    good lord. jeannie longo is 45. she was in the 1984 olympics as well as
    this one so i doubt she started late.
    --
    david reuteler
    [email protected]
     
  17. Chris BeHanna wrote:
    > Ekimov (a Postie) is 38 years old and rode in the TdF this year,
    > and will be riding next year, too. I don't know when he started
    > either, but it was probably a bit later than Lance started.


    Ekimov started training at a bicycle school at age 12. He won a junior
    track championship in the mid eighties. He won Olympic Gold in 1988 in
    Team Pursuit at age 22. He won his first TdF stage in 1991 at age 25.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/teamprofiles/2001/ekimov01.shtml

    That article is a little old. At this point he's been in 13 of the last
    14 TdF's and finished all 13 times.

    Did Lance start training to be a top cyclist before age 12?
     
  18. ed073

    ed073 New Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2004
    Messages:
    1,528
    Likes Received:
    0
    true.
    Yeki went to the Kuznetsov track school at 12 and has been riding bikes ever since. his one and only stage win at the Tour came at Macon in 1991 when he ripped off the front of the peloton and gave them a brilliant demonstration of TTing.

    One of his gold medal winning teammates from Seoul was Tour yellow jersey wearer Eugeni Berzin
     
  19. David Reuteler wrote:
    > Chris BeHanna <[email protected]pammersmustdie.behanna.org> wrote:
    >
    >> Ekimov (a Postie) is 38 years old and rode in the TdF this year,
    >>and will be riding next year, too. I don't know when he started
    >>either, but it was probably a bit later than Lance started.

    >
    >
    > good lord. jeannie longo is 45. she was in the 1984 olympics as well as
    > this one so i doubt she started late.


    We'll have to see how she does in the rest of the Olympics, but she
    didn't place in the women's road race and hasn't won Olympic gold since
    1996, when she was 37/38 (that's still pretty impressive). Is she still
    competing in the women's TdF? She hasn't won one since 1989.

    Actually, just the fact that she *qualified* for the Olympics at the age
    of 45 is pretty darn impressive all by itself, and she's arguably the
    Eddie Merckx of women's cycling.

    -km

    --
    the black rose
    proud to be owned by a yorkie
    http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
     
  20. MortDubois

    MortDubois Guest

    Heath <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, just a quick one...is it too late to start cycling at the age of 18
    > considering most elite cyclists would have started at a far earlier
    > age?


    Unlike many sports, road cycling requires no special coordination or
    technique. (Mountain biking is slightly more skill-intensive) You
    simply have to be able to ride faster than the other people, which is
    largely a function of your own aerobic capabilities and body type.
    What the elite riders have in common is not that they started young,
    but that they have awesome hearts and lungs paired up with a skinny
    body. A few years of consistent training and racing at the local
    level will tell you whether you will make it to the elite level. Get
    a decent bike, find a local club, and have at it. Even if you never
    reat Cat. 1, you will still have a lot of fun.
     
Loading...