Too Much Sleep

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Madasu, May 5, 2003.

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  1. Madasu

    Madasu Guest

    I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    any ideas?

    --
    Mad
     
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  2. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Madasu" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > any ideas?
    >
    With me it's just the surprise, my body isn't used to it soit tries to take a bit more time
    to recover.

    If I do it regularly I don't have any lasting tiredness, it only takes a few sessions
    close together.
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Madasu <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > any ideas?

    Certainly not old age. It's probably just a healthy response to the increase in your mileage.

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Madasu <[email protected]> typed:
    > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > any ideas?

    Go and have a check up at the doctors. He can screen out things like anaemia which could contribute
    to your tiredness.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  5. W K

    W K Guest

    "Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Madasu <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is
    it
    > > diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one any ideas?
    >
    > Certainly not old age. It's probably just a healthy response to the increase in your mileage.

    yep... I saw one of those media mangled "scientific discovery" things that concluded that sleep was
    more important than exercise, so keep it up!

    (No doubt comparing a lot of atheletes who do many hours a day anyway)
     
  6. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], W K <[email protected]> typed:
    >
    > yep... I saw one of those media mangled "scientific discovery" things that concluded that sleep
    > was more important than exercise, so keep it up!
    >

    Alternatively "There'll be plenty of time to sleep when you're dead" (Anon)

    Tony ;-)

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  7. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In news:[email protected], Madasu <[email protected]> typed:
    > > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > > any ideas?
    >
    > Go and have a check up at the doctors. He can screen out things like anaemia which could
    > contribute to your tiredness.

    Becoming tired and needing more sleep is a well established natural response to an increase in
    physical workload. I do not think it's a good idea to take this to your doctor provided the need for
    extra sleep is clearly correlated with a recent significant increase in exercise. If the tiredness
    is causing genuine problems, for example it might not be wise to fall asleep at your job as a lorry
    driver, lathe operator or radio presenter, or sleeping for 14 hours is causing family problems, I
    would scale back the training a bit before seeking medical advice.

    If the sleepiness persists after several weeks, and particularly if you do not feel refreshed after
    a long night's sleep then I would agree with Tony that it's a good idea to have it properly
    investigated.

    Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, just some bloke on the Internet.

    --
    Dave...
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Dave Kahn <[email protected]> typed:
    > "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >
    > If the sleepiness persists after several weeks, and particularly if you do not feel refreshed
    > after a long night's sleep then I would agree with Tony that it's a good idea to have it properly
    > investigated.
    >

    An increase in exercise does take time to adjust to but it can also bring out underlying problems
    that may not manifest themselves strongly in a less active lifestyle - anaemia, diabetes, heart etc.
    Also if you are starting exercise anew its not a bad idea to have a quick checkover from the GP
    first. They generally do not mind so I would suggest its better to have a checkup before you start
    than sometime downstream when problems are persisting.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  9. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Tony Raven quoted:
    > Alternatively "There'll be plenty of time to sleep when you're dead" (Anon)

    Bon Jovi. Or near enough: "I'm gonna live while I'm alive, I'll sleep when I'm dead."

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  10. Madasu

    Madasu Guest

    On Mon, 5 May 2003 23:02:10 +0100, Madasu went and written:

    >
    > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > any ideas?

    Thanks everybody.

    I think I'll keep at my current miles for a few weeks and see if there's any improvement.

    --
    Mad
     
  11. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Mon, 5 May 2003 23:02:10 +0100, Madasu <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    >sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    >any ideas?
    >

    Hi Mad

    Firstly: The almost compulsory and inevitable disclaimer: I'm not a doctor.

    I suffer from both insomnia and whatever its opposite is called. Basically, I have great trouble in
    controlling my sleep. Some days/nights I'll go to bed and not fall asleep for six or more hours. At
    other times I'll go to bed, fall as;eep immediately and not wake up for 24, 36 or even 48 hours.
    This is because of an injury I had very approximately 14 years, 4 days, 5 hours and 18 minutes ago -
    at the time of writing that sentence ;-)

    However, when I do cycle regularly and for reasonably long distances - and I haven't recently - I do
    notice that my sleep pattern is much improved. After good exersise every day over a period of a
    little as four or five days I always find that my sleep becomes more normal.

    I obviously feel tired in my muscles if I have overexerted myself, but as far as sleep is concerned
    - and this is the root of your question - I feel much, much better.

    Finally, I'm 38. Also, consulting you doctor is never a bad idea if you have not done much exercise
    for a while. As others have implied, there may be an underlying problem.

    Regards and good luck James

    PS Time correction: 38 minutes ;-)

    --
    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/c.butty/Dscf0632.jpg
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Danny Colyer <[email protected]> typed:
    > Tony Raven quoted:
    >> Alternatively "There'll be plenty of time to sleep when you're dead" (Anon)
    >
    > Bon Jovi. Or near enough: "I'm gonna live while I'm alive, I'll sleep when I'm dead."

    Or Grateful Dead or the man in the Bond film or a range of others who may either have come up with
    it but probably just repeated it.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
  13. Iarocu

    Iarocu Guest

    Madasu <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 5 May 2003 23:02:10 +0100, Madasu went and written:
    >
    > >
    > > I'm slowly increasing my miles, currently up to around the 40 mark. The trouble is that I end up
    > > sleeping for 13 to 14 hours that evening. Is it diet, fitness, or just old age at 43? Any one
    > > any ideas?
    >
    > Thanks everybody.
    >
    > I think I'll keep at my current miles for a few weeks and see if there's any improvement.

    Hi You don,t say how many times a week you do your 40 miles. As a 42 year old I find improving
    fitness takes longer these days than it used to. I sleep longer (and better) after exercise. Make
    sure you are taking enough rest days. If you only cycle once or twice a week then another shorter
    ride even 10 or 20 miles would maybe help. cheers Iain
     
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