Top girls

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tony W, Sep 30, 2003.

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  1. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    second in their list.

    :~)

    T

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/gender/story/0,11812,1052433,00.html

    Story reads:-

    Nicole Cooke Age: 20 Cyclist

    Nicole Cooke moves fast. Two years ago, when racing as a junior, Cooke signalled her intentions by
    winning gold in not one but three disciplines at cycling's world championships. This year she has
    established herself as a major force in the senior ranks by claiming the season-long world cup
    competition with, to date, three outright wins in seven races. Still just 20 and in only her second
    year as a professional, Cooke has already proved herself one of the best in the world.

    In a context where women's cycling rarely even merits a mention among the results listings on
    British sports pages, this chirpy, affable young woman from Wick in the Vale of Glamorgan has
    already raised the profile of the sport significantly. As a pro, she is now based in Italy and
    spends eight months of the year racing in mainland Europe or further afield. After her last race of
    the season, the world championships, she is ready to come home to see family and friends. "Catching
    up with people is very important to me," she says. "I'm looking forward to having some quiet time to
    relax." Having already mastered Italian, she now plans to learn French - a useful language for a
    professional cyclist. And she would like to take some piano lessons. She used to play the violin
    before cycling took over her life.

    That started when she was 11 and took part in her first cyclo-cross [off-road] race. "It was cold
    and rainy and muddy - but it was fun, and I was hooked," she recalls. Her talent was such that,
    within a few weeks, she had won in her age category at the Welsh championships - competing
    against boys as well as girls. A good many boys since have had to get used to being bested by
    Cooke. By the time she was a teenager, she would go to Holland every summer for a big junior
    stage race. "At first, the Dutch boys didn't like to be beaten by a foreign girl." But as her
    years as a junior passed, she made her mark: "They knew me and they knew that I raced hard, so
    I'd built some respect."

    Racing in the Netherlands was important for another reason. "In the UK, women's cycling is covered
    so little, I didn't know anything about it - and I was already into cycling," she says. "But
    spending time in Holland, I realised that cyclists could get recognition and be real stars." As she
    progressed, it became clear that she had the potential to earn a living by racing. So far, she
    simply loves her cycling: "I don't really think of it as a job." Despite having chosen one of the
    most arduous sports going, motivation does not seem a problem. "I'm quite ambitious and determined,"
    she says. "In competitive situations, it's my pride and wanting to keep up my reputation."

    At present, she still has too many goals in the sport - the Olympics, the women's editions of the
    Tour de France and the Giro d'Italia, the world championships - to think much about the future
    beyond her pro career. But she expects to stay in cycling. "In my local area, around Cardiff, I like
    to think that I'm an inspiration to youngsters," she says. "If the opportunity came along, I'd like
    to be an ambassador for cycling."

    And since women's cycling is very much the poor relation to the men's sport, there are plenty of
    improvements she would like to make. "There is no minimum wage for women," she says [men are
    guaranteed a minimum wage from their team sponsors], "and the sport is not well regulated by the UCI
    [cycling's governing body]." Her Italian team is a good one but, she says, "Some are not well
    managed and take advantage of women."

    Which is something, one senses, that will never happen to her. Ask her what her greatest ambition
    is, and her steady, even reply is: "To be remembered as the best woman cyclist ever." From someone
    less unassuming - or less talented - this might sound like pride. From Nicole Cooke, it just seems
    like a statement of fact.
     
    Tags:


  2. >The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    >second in their list.

    I have been inspired to write to the Guardian ;-)

    Sirs

    How excellent to see the Guardian mention Nicole Cooke (Top girls: part one, 30 September 2003).
    Cooke, at only 20 years of age is undoubtedly one of the finest sportswomen Wales and Britain has
    ever produced. In her sport she is as groundbreaking as Paula Radcliffe is in hers, yet Nicole is
    largely ignored by the British media, in particular the sporting media who seem to be of the
    impression that unless it's football, rugby, golf or athletics, it's not a sport worthy of
    attention. Nicole is not, however, ignored by countless cycling fans throughout Britain who follow
    her career and achievements closely. Not only is she a remarkable sportswoman, she is a remarkably
    mature young woman who comes across as being very well-grounded and filled with enthusiasm for her
    sport. When it comes to voting for the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, every cyclist in the UK
    should vote for Nicole.

    Yours faithfully

    Helen Simmons

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h*$el***$$n*$d$ot$**s**i$$m*$m$**on**[email protected]*$$a**$*ol*$*.*$$c$om*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  3. "wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > When it comes to voting for the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, every cyclist in the UK
    > should vote for Nicole.

    Where do we vote?
     
  4. Marc

    Marc Guest

    wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When it comes to voting for the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, every cyclist in the UK
    > should vote for Nicole.

    Not a hope in hell! Even in the BBC Wales Sports' Personality of the Year she only managed a second
    against a football team manager. A MANAGER!!!! I thought it was meant to be about personality? A
    very nice touch was that a few weeks later in all the local Supermarkets there was a poster from
    Nicole thanking everyone that had voted for her, nothing in the local press though and nothing from
    the football manager.

    --
    Marc Please note this is now a redundant email address. Add an extra c at the end of marc to email.
     
  5. David Brown :eek:) wrote:
    > "wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >> When it comes to voting for the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, every cyclist in the UK
    >> should vote for Nicole.
    >
    >
    > Where do we vote?
    >
    >

    Wait for it....

    Actually if the BBC get wind that she has even been mentioned on the internet they will disqualify
    her on the grounds that the cyclists cheated and organized a dastardly scheme to vote for her. Just
    like they did with greatest inventions.

    --
    Chris dot Gerhard at btclick dot com.
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Chris Gerhard <[email protected]_btclick.com> wrote:

    > >
    > >> When it comes to voting for the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, every cyclist in the UK
    > >> should vote for Nicole.
    > >
    > >
    > > Where do we vote?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Wait for it....
    >
    > Actually if the BBC get wind that she has even been mentioned on the internet they will disqualify
    > her on the grounds that the cyclists cheated and organized a dastardly scheme to vote for her.
    > Just like they did with greatest inventions.

    I can never understand the idea of the BBC Sports' Personality of the Year, it would save a lot of
    time and energy if the BBC just measured the column inches and TV minutes exepended during the year
    and got their matching result that way.

    --
    Marc Please note this is now a redundant email address. Add an extra c at the end of marc to email.
     
  7. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    > second in their list.
    >
    > :~)
    >
    > T
    >
    > http://www.guardian.co.uk/gender/story/0,11812,1052433,00.html
    >
    > Story reads:-
    >
    > Nicole Cooke Age: 20 Cyclist
    >
    > Nicole Cooke moves fast. Two years ago, when racing as a junior, Cooke signalled her intentions by
    > winning gold in not one but three disciplines
    at
    > cycling's world championships. This year she has established herself as a major force in the
    > senior ranks by claiming the season-long world cup competition with, to date, three outright wins
    > in seven races. Still just
    20
    > and in only her second year as a professional, Cooke has already proved herself one of the best in
    > the world.
    >
    > In a context where women's cycling rarely even merits a mention among the results listings on
    > British sports pages, this chirpy, affable young woman from Wick in the Vale of Glamorgan has
    > already raised the profile of the sport significantly. As a pro, she is now based in Italy and
    > spends eight months of the year racing in mainland Europe or further afield. After her last race
    > of the season, the world championships, she is ready to come
    home
    > to see family and friends. "Catching up with people is very important to me," she says. "I'm
    > looking forward to having some quiet time to relax." Having already mastered Italian, she now
    > plans to learn French - a useful language for a professional cyclist. And she would like to take
    > some piano lessons. She used to play the violin before cycling took over her life.
    >
    > That started when she was 11 and took part in her first cyclo-cross [off-road] race. "It was cold
    > and rainy and muddy - but it was fun, and I was hooked," she recalls. Her talent was such that,
    > within a few weeks,
    she
    > had won in her age category at the Welsh championships - competing against

    > boys as well as girls. A good many boys since have had to get used to
    being
    > bested by Cooke. By the time she was a teenager, she would go to Holland every summer for a big
    > junior stage race. "At first, the Dutch boys didn't like to be beaten by a foreign girl." But as
    > her years as a junior passed, she made her mark: "They knew me and they knew that I raced hard, so
    > I'd built some respect."
    >
    > Racing in the Netherlands was important for another reason. "In the UK, women's cycling is covered
    > so little, I didn't know anything about it -
    and
    > I was already into cycling," she says. "But spending time in Holland, I realised that cyclists
    > could get recognition and be real stars." As she progressed, it became clear that she had the
    > potential to earn a living by racing. So far, she simply loves her cycling: "I don't really
    > think of it
    as
    > a job." Despite having chosen one of the most arduous sports going, motivation does not seem a
    > problem. "I'm quite ambitious and determined," she says. "In competitive situations, it's my pride
    > and wanting to keep up my reputation."
    >
    > At present, she still has too many goals in the sport - the Olympics, the women's editions of
    > the Tour de France and the Giro d'Italia, the world championships - to think much about the
    > future beyond her pro career. But she expects to stay in cycling. "In my local area, around
    > Cardiff, I like
    to
    > think that I'm an inspiration to youngsters," she says. "If the
    opportunity
    > came along, I'd like to be an ambassador for cycling."
    >
    > And since women's cycling is very much the poor relation to the men's
    sport,
    > there are plenty of improvements she would like to make. "There is no minimum wage for women," she
    > says [men are guaranteed a minimum wage from their team sponsors], "and the sport is not well
    > regulated by the UCI [cycling's governing body]." Her Italian team is a good one but, she says,
    > "Some are not well managed and take advantage of women."
    >
    > Which is something, one senses, that will never happen to her. Ask her
    what
    > her greatest ambition is, and her steady, even reply is: "To be remembered as the best woman
    > cyclist ever." From someone less unassuming - or less talented - this might sound like pride. From
    > Nicole Cooke, it just seems like a statement of fact.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    How does a "Rapper" get on the list ? Rapping is about as useful as a chocolate tea-pot. Why don't
    they call it "talking with music for people who can't sing". Not as catchy I suppose but true !

    Graham
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    > > second in their list.

    Though the list is unordered, other than that things tend to come in an order in print. She does,
    however, get a half page feature rather than an ordinary mention in the list.

    [nice trimming Graham!]
    > How does a "Rapper" get on the list ? Rapping is about as useful as a chocolate tea-pot. Why don't
    > they call it "talking with music for people who can't sing". Not as catchy I suppose but true !

    Cycle racing is just about as useful as rapping, both are entertainments which can generate money.
    In fact most of the women on there are just as useful as rappers, not many actually make things we
    need. It's just a subjective list to fill a few pages in a newspaper supplement. You may not like
    rapping but the rapper featured will probably make a shedload of money entertaining people who do. I
    imagine there are plenty of people reading the feature wondering why there are sportswomen included,
    after all they're not very "useful".

    Colin
     
  9. On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 08:11:22 +0100, "Tony W" <[email protected]> in
    <[email protected]-161007.news.uni-berlin.de> wrote:

    >The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    >second in their list.

    She'd be TOP of my list but not necessarily for the right reason.

    Phew, I shall have to go and lie down for a while. Just thinking about her makes me dizzy.

    Love and legs from Rich x

    --
    "Netiquette" states that a signature should be no more than four lines long.
     
  10. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A
    certain
    > > > Nicole Cooke appears second in their list.
    >
    > Though the list is unordered, other than that things tend to come in an order in print. She does,
    > however, get a half page feature rather than an ordinary mention in the list.
    >
    > [nice trimming Graham!]
    > > How does a "Rapper" get on the list ? Rapping is about as useful as a chocolate tea-pot. Why
    > > don't they call it "talking with music for people
    who
    > > can't sing". Not as catchy I suppose but true !
    >
    > Cycle racing is just about as useful as rapping, both are entertainments which can generate money.
    > In fact most of the women on there are just as useful as rappers, not many actually make things we
    > need. It's just a subjective list to fill a few pages in a newspaper supplement. You may not like
    > rapping but the rapper featured will probably make a shedload of money entertaining people who do.
    > I imagine there are plenty of people reading the feature wondering why there are sportswomen
    > included, after all they're not very "useful".
    >
    > Colin

    What's trimming ?

    Graham
     
  11. >Phew, I shall have to go and lie down for a while. Just thinking about her makes me dizzy.
    >
    >Love and legs from Rich x
    >

    This should keep you happy...

    http://www.nicolecooke.com/2003/gallery/index.html

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h*$el***$$n*$d$ot$**s**i$$m*$m$**on**[email protected]*$$a**$*ol*$*.*$$c$om*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  12. On 30 Sep 2003 17:49:31 GMT, [email protected] (wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX) in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This should keep you happy... http://www.nicolecooke.com/2003/gallery/index.html

    I'd marry her. But I think she might get upset if I kept going out on my bike ;-)

    I wonder if she ever lurks in here?

    Hello Nicole!

    Love and hugs from Rich x

    --
    "Netiquette" states that a signature should be no more than four lines long.
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> writes:

    > The Grauniad is running a list of women most likely to succeed. A certain Nicole Cooke appears
    > second in their list.
    >
    > :~)
    >
    > T
    >
    > http://www.guardian.co.uk/gender/story/0,11812,1052433,00.html
    >
    > Story reads:-
    >
    > Nicole Cooke Age: 20 Cyclist

    What's actually interesting about this is the number of young women who are hitting the top in a
    range of very tough sports. I'm thinking of people like (from my other sport) Ellen MacArthur and
    Emma Richards
    - immensely self confident and able, and competing at the very top level without any concessions to
    gender. It seems that for all the feminism of the sixties, seventies and eighties it's only now
    that we're getting a generation of young women through who really have the confidence to believe
    that they can be the best at their chosen activity, whatever it is, and to challenge the men in
    the traditionally 'hard man' sports.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; I'd rather live in sybar-space
     
  14. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Richard Bates"
    >
    > I'd marry her. But I think she might get upset if I kept going out on my bike ;-)
    >
    > I wonder if she ever lurks in here?
    >
    > Hello Nicole!

    Bucket of iced water -- quick!!
     
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