Topeak Bikamper

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Plodder, Jan 6, 2006.

  1. Plodder

    Plodder Guest

    Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?

    Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like some
    opinions on it first. I'd also like to look at one - anyone know if they are
    sold in Perth?

    Any other advice on tents suitable for bike touring welcome!

    Please, give generously of your collective wisdom, Oh Great Newsgroup...

    Cheers,

    Frank

    --
    Frank
    [email protected]
    Drop DACKS to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. eddiec

    eddiec New Member

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    I've looked into it, but felt i had too many tents already too justify!

    It's a nifty concept indeed, and I like the gadgety approach, but it would be worthwhile comparing it in terms of weight/space/cost to normal tents - I think the comparison wouldn't be too favourable for it with similar stand-alone tents available for a similar price with similar specs, and the bonus of being able to separate bike from tent if need be... You're really only saving one or two poles worth of weight/space, which aint much these days...

    Not sure if there's anywhere you can see it in the flesh - Tents are one of those funny things where cubic dimensions of space don't really show you how spacious/convenient it is...
     
  3. smartie

    smartie New Member

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    The major problem i can see with them is that if you want to leave it up at a campsite and go off for a ride you cannot as the poles are essentially your bike itself.

    It is also a bit cumbersome to get into and out of as you have to go around your bike to get into the tent.

    There are some great looking 2 person tents on the market, just look in your local camping store and check them out. Saw a nice one in Kathmandu the other day but didn't check it out as i wasn't looking for a tent.
     
  4. Plodder wrote:
    > Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    > http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?
    >
    > Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like some
    > opinions on it first.


    well, you did ask. {:)
    1) it is rubbish.
    2) you can not put your tent up until you have finished with your
    bicycle for the day. so no claiming your tent spot, then off loading and
    going shopping/drinking/parading/etc.
    3) you are going to damage your self with the pedals every time you
    enter of leave the tent and/or collect grease off the chain.
    4) you are going to have to clean the front wheel every time you put
    your tent up.
    5) It helps make your tent stand out for the local hoons to do wheelies
    in their crap utes around.
    6) It probably costs a fortune? (cripes, so do Paddy Pallins online
    offers too!)

    7) I wouldn't be seen dead or alive around a yellow and grey tent )(oh
    shite, I've just remembered that my current little tent is maroon and
    sandal wood {;-(.
    8) If you want to save pole weight, get a basic tent that uses a pieces
    of fallen timber.
    9) I could probably create the same with a cheap rip stop fly, a mossie
    net and a few pieces cord and timber.
    10) If you want it stand stand up in strong wind, then you are going to
    need to carry a couple of pound of tent pegs any way.

    Nuff?
     
  5. Parbs

    Parbs Guest

    "Plodder" asked...
    > Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    > http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?


    No

    > Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like some
    > opinions on it first. I'd also like to look at one - anyone know if they are
    > sold in Perth?


    Looks like a nifty idea someone had when they forgot their poles turned into a product for a market where superior options already
    exist. Probably a bit heavy and cramped. More importantly what are you going to ride into town to go to the pub after you've set
    your tent up?

    Not sure of anywhere in Perth but if you want to be the ginnea pig for us Woolies Wheels in Sydney have them for $399 online.

    > Any other advice on tents suitable for bike touring welcome!


    Have a look at these, you can probably find them in some of the outdoor/camping shops to have a look at in person (and get a bettera
    price)

    http://www.wildhorizons.com.au/gear/tentgear.html

    Also have a look at the MSR range particularly the Microzoid range. If you're after cycling luxury try the Velo with room to park
    your bike

    http://www.gogogear.com.au/shopexd.asp?id=725

    > Please, give generously of your collective wisdom, Oh Great Newsgroup...


    Please note the opinions of this author are not based on any cycle touring.

    > Cheers,
    >
    > Frank


    Parbs
     
  6. adam85

    adam85 Guest

    "Plodder" <[email protected] (remove DAKS to reply)> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    > http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?
    >
    > Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like some
    > opinions on it first. I'd also like to look at one - anyone know if they
    > are
    > sold in Perth?


    Yeah like the others said, maybe not such a crash hot design. When touring I
    wouldn't my bike as part of the tent as I often set up the tent, then use to
    bike to get around, ride into town, go to the pub or go on day trips
    unladen.

    > Any other advice on tents suitable for bike touring welcome!
    >
    > Please, give generously of your collective wisdom, Oh Great Newsgroup...


    I haven't used a whole heap of different tents but the one I ended up
    getting is great. It's a Salewa Sierra Leone. Not a real lightweight tent
    (just over 3kg) but it's a decent size and comfortable for two of us, has
    two entrances and vestibules where you can throw your panniers, vents, a
    mesh shelf above your head for throwing stuff and most importantly it takes
    less than 2 minutes to setup and pack away.

    http://www.salewa.com/ausruestung.p...af14c75e817bcc881&m=4&lang=uk&prid=137&ac=det

    Adam
     
  7. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

  8. gaza

    gaza Guest

    Most of these tents are good enough
    http://www.grangerscampingworld.com.au/default.htm
    I have the Oztrail Bike/Hike...got it for around $125....it weighs about
    2kg. I also take it on multi day walks and it's great for the price and
    weight (one pole only). I's also withstood 80kph winds on Wilsons
    Promentory. Just recently I took up the Xmas special of the Hennessy Hammock
    in a bid to go lighter again in my hiking and I love it. So far I have only
    spent a few nights in it over Xmas but I slept great and better than I
    normally do in a tent....maybe the few extra beers helped too!!!
    http://www.hennessyhammock.com
     
  9. Plodder

    Plodder Guest

    --
    Frank
    [email protected]
    Drop DACKS to reply
    "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]com.au.
    ...
    > Plodder wrote:
    > > Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    > > http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?
    > >
    > > Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like

    some
    > > opinions on it first.

    >
    > well, you did ask. {:)
    > 1) it is rubbish.
    > 2) you can not put your tent up until you have finished with your
    > bicycle for the day. so no claiming your tent spot, then off loading and
    > going shopping/drinking/parading/etc.
    > 3) you are going to damage your self with the pedals every time you
    > enter of leave the tent and/or collect grease off the chain.
    > 4) you are going to have to clean the front wheel every time you put
    > your tent up.
    > 5) It helps make your tent stand out for the local hoons to do wheelies
    > in their crap utes around.
    > 6) It probably costs a fortune? (cripes, so do Paddy Pallins online
    > offers too!)
    >
    > 7) I wouldn't be seen dead or alive around a yellow and grey tent )(oh
    > shite, I've just remembered that my current little tent is maroon and
    > sandal wood {;-(.
    > 8) If you want to save pole weight, get a basic tent that uses a pieces
    > of fallen timber.
    > 9) I could probably create the same with a cheap rip stop fly, a mossie
    > net and a few pieces cord and timber.
    > 10) If you want it stand stand up in strong wind, then you are going to
    > need to carry a couple of pound of tent pegs any way.
    >
    > Nuff?


    Bloody good set of crtiticisms :)

    One thing that was putting me off was the idea that it doesn't stand alone -
    it needs the bike for support.

    Hmm - a little cooler in Perth today. Maybe a spin intoKathmandu and Paddy
    Pallin is in order...

    Cheers,

    Frank
     
  10. Plodder

    Plodder Guest

    --
    Frank
    [email protected]
    Drop DACKS to reply
    "Plodder" <[email protected] (remove DAKS to reply)> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    > http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?
    >
    > Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like some
    > opinions on it first. I'd also like to look at one - anyone know if they

    are
    > sold in Perth?
    >
    > Any other advice on tents suitable for bike touring welcome!
    >
    > Please, give generously of your collective wisdom, Oh Great Newsgroup...
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Frank
    >
    > --
    > Frank
    > [email protected]
    > Drop DACKS to reply


    Ta to all. I think I was attracted to the gadgety part - on reflection the
    Bikamper wouldn't do me too well.

    I'll check out some of your suggestions - thanks muchly. I'm new to the
    touring-with-a-tent thing, my previous tenting being with nice roomy tents
    carried in cars. Don't want to do the usual thing (for me) and buy several
    tents before I find a good one and end up with a heap of tents next to the
    pile of saddles and other assorted bike bits...

    Cheers,

    Frank
     
  11. Plodder wrote:
    > Don't want to do the usual thing (for me) and buy several
    > tents before I find a good one and end up with a heap of tents next to the
    > pile of saddles and other assorted bike bits...


    Pray tell, what is wrong with this? {:)

    Naah, know what you mean.
    Seriously, you can expect to buy at least two.
    The first one tells you what you really want in the second, just like
    with bicycles.

    My criteria (after 30 years bicycle touring) for a nylon tent.


    Double skin
    Inner skin; mossie/fly neeting should erectable by itself - cool in
    summer, see stars, etc.

    Ninimal pegs to erect, current requires four pegs for inner, 2-8(?) for
    outer.

    Integral floor, vestibule(s), two entry points.
    Chnky or metal zips (I add snap large swivels to make easier to find at
    night.

    Some peeps like domes, as they can have lots of internal space for gear
    and can stand independently without pegs. Seem to also have better head
    room. I might try one next time, but I still think I'll be snaking
    across the floor to pull on the strides.

    I like tube/torpedoes for minimal area to wind. Currently I am using a
    Companion Orion, which is about 20 (?)years old.


    Prefer fibreglass poles as when they splinter you can usually tape them
    up and continue to use them. Try to choose a pole with segments that is
    fairly generic, that way you can buy any longer pole and cut it down.
    Noticed these are commonly available now.

    When I was on the road regularly, I carried one spare long segment and
    one spare short segment, but thinking about all this is really going
    into it deeply.

    I was googling to see if the Companion Orion is still around and found
    http://www.discountcamping.com.au/ (no connection) which shows there is
    a wider range of styles these days.

    Last points, consider size before weight, as in, where are you going to
    carry it? I usually found that the fabric can be balled/rolled anywhere
    in a pannier (small stuff sacks handy here), it was the length of poles
    that might require consideration.

    My 2c, start with something economical, use it, wear it out, buy another.
     
  12. DD

    DD Guest

    Plodder wrote:
    > --
    > Frank
    > [email protected]
    > Drop DACKS to reply
    > "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]com.au.
    > ..
    >
    >>Plodder wrote:
    >>
    >>>Anyone used/using a Topeak Bikamper:
    >>>http://www.topeak.com/products/Topeak-BikamperProdcutlisting.html ?
    >>>
    >>>Looks like a nifty idea. I'm thinking about getting one but I'd like

    >
    > some
    >
    >>>opinions on it first.

    >>
    >>well, you did ask. {:)
    >>1) it is rubbish.
    >>2) you can not put your tent up until you have finished with your
    >>bicycle for the day. so no claiming your tent spot, then off loading and
    >>going shopping/drinking/parading/etc.
    >>3) you are going to damage your self with the pedals every time you
    >>enter of leave the tent and/or collect grease off the chain.
    >>4) you are going to have to clean the front wheel every time you put
    >>your tent up.
    >>5) It helps make your tent stand out for the local hoons to do wheelies
    >>in their crap utes around.
    >>6) It probably costs a fortune? (cripes, so do Paddy Pallins online
    >>offers too!)
    >>
    >>7) I wouldn't be seen dead or alive around a yellow and grey tent )(oh
    >>shite, I've just remembered that my current little tent is maroon and
    >>sandal wood {;-(.
    >>8) If you want to save pole weight, get a basic tent that uses a pieces
    >>of fallen timber.
    >>9) I could probably create the same with a cheap rip stop fly, a mossie
    >>net and a few pieces cord and timber.
    >>10) If you want it stand stand up in strong wind, then you are going to
    >>need to carry a couple of pound of tent pegs any way.
    >>
    >>Nuff?

    >
    >
    > Bloody good set of crtiticisms :)
    >
    > One thing that was putting me off was the idea that it doesn't stand alone -
    > it needs the bike for support.
    >
    > Hmm - a little cooler in Perth today. Maybe a spin intoKathmandu and Paddy
    > Pallin is in order...
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Frank
    >
    >

    Kathmandu in Perth (and probably elsewhere) has a sale on today, ends
    5pm. Sorry, I didn't look at tents.
    I bought one of those foldup bathroom kit rolls, the small one with a
    hook on the end and lots of pockets and zippers, no mirror. This made a
    good toolbag to stow in a pannier pocket and when in use the hook holds
    it to the frame while I work away on the bike. Might only work in my
    imagination but we'll see.
     
  13. Landline

    Landline Guest

    The Coleman range are hard to beat for value for money, well designed,
    plenty of fresh air vents and importantly thought of use
    http://www.colemanaustralia.com.au/Product,1160.aspx
    We have a Duo2 for the 2 of us and bought a replacement Duo2 when the last
    one was stolen from a campsite
    Sufficient ventilation and waterproof is top of our list. The Duo2 fits the
    bill well


    "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]com.au...
    >
    > My criteria (after 30 years bicycle touring) for a nylon tent.
    >
    >
    > Double skin
    > Inner skin; mossie/fly neeting should erectable by itself - cool in
    > summer, see stars, etc.
    >
    > Ninimal pegs to erect, current requires four pegs for inner, 2-8(?) for
    > outer.
    >
    > Integral floor, vestibule(s), two entry points.
    > Chnky or metal zips (I add snap large swivels to make easier to find at
    > night.
    >
    > Some peeps like domes, as they can have lots of internal space for gear
    > and can stand independently without pegs. Seem to also have better head
    > room. I might try one next time, but I still think I'll be snaking
    > across the floor to pull on the strides.
    >
    > I like tube/torpedoes for minimal area to wind. Currently I am using a
    > Companion Orion, which is about 20 (?)years old.
    >
    >
    > Prefer fibreglass poles as when they splinter you can usually tape them
    > up and continue to use them. Try to choose a pole with segments that is
    > fairly generic, that way you can buy any longer pole and cut it down.
    > Noticed these are commonly available now.
    >
    > When I was on the road regularly, I carried one spare long segment and
    > one spare short segment, but thinking about all this is really going
    > into it deeply.
    >
    > I was googling to see if the Companion Orion is still around and found
    > http://www.discountcamping.com.au/ (no connection) which shows there is
    > a wider range of styles these days.
    >
    > Last points, consider size before weight, as in, where are you going to
    > carry it? I usually found that the fabric can be balled/rolled anywhere
    > in a pannier (small stuff sacks handy here), it was the length of poles
    > that might require consideration.
    >
    > My 2c, start with something economical, use it, wear it out, buy another.
    >
     
  14. Book

    Book Guest

    G'day,

    I'd suggest checking out Great Outdoors (formerly called Boots). They have a
    range of less expensive "adventure" tents (their words) that are
    surprisingly well designed. Considering that their parent company is Arthur
    Ellis (think Fairydown), they probably share some design features. The cycle
    2L might be worth a look:
    http://www.greatoutdoors.com.au/files/lightweight_adventure_domes.pdf

    I've got the Solitude (single person tent, 1.75kg) and the 2 lite (2 person,
    3.2kg 2pole). What can I say- they were on sale.... I've got no complaints
    about them!

    Book
     
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