toronto to vancouver ride

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by sunnycuts, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. sunnycuts

    sunnycuts New Member

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    I am wondering if anybody on here has done this. i plan on doing something like this summer 2005.

    I found this site but they fly to vancouver and bike to halifax.

    http://members.rogers.com/amedcalf/index.html

    Any tips? I have never been to b.c and will be finished university in toronto(read have no money;P) in may. Apparentaly from west to east you have the wind at your back which is a plus but being in toronto should cut my total time compare4d to riding all of canada and I d like to spend time in bc when I get there.
     
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  2. wasted weasel

    wasted weasel New Member

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    I didn't read through the whole article yet, but it looks as though that group of cyclists had two big Ryder rental trucks for support to carry they're camping equipment and spare parts etc....



    I think planning a cycling trip on a low budget across the country would be very difficult, especially by yourself (not that you said you were going alone or with other people).



    I've done one cross country (well not quite, Ontario to BC) trip by motorcycle and several multi day trips where I was completely self sufficient. Meaning I had a tent, sleeping bag, frying pan, food, change of clothes, an additional 40lb's of tools, spare cables, tire tube, signal flares, basically everything I needed to fix the bike if it broke. I couldn't imagine trying to plan and organize an adventure like that......



    .......but I've always be jealous of the people who manage to pull it off. Have you ever done a major cycling trip before?
     
  3. trihard

    trihard New Member

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    Hey,

    I've ridden W->E through BC, on both the Trans Canada and the #3 (Crowsnest) highways. I have a few friends who've done the whole trip, BC to NS. Don't kid yourself, the wind at your back for the 1500km across the prairies is a pretty big consideration. It's the difference between riding 15km/hr for 100 hours with a headwind, or 30 km/hr for 50 hours with a tailwind.

    either way, it's certainly an epic ride. Good luck

    --tim

     
  4. sunnycuts

    sunnycuts New Member

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    No I have not done a major trip before,toronto to waterloo was solid but nothing overnight or crazy mad distance. I was just wondering if someone else had ideas or had done it east to west. It would be me and my brother both mid twenties with pretty good endurance. I will probly try maybe a toronto to halifax trip before I go crazy. And when I do go I'll likely go on the bc to halifax trip with that website package thing( when I have money:p).
     
  5. LeGobu

    LeGobu New Member

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    I biked Vancouver to Ottawa last summer (2003) self-supported. It took 40 days of cycling. Although I counted on having a tailwind through the Prairies, I was there at an odd time when the wind mostly came from the east. The prairie wind is quite maddening if you've never experienced it because it is constant and doesn't come and go like it does in Ontario.

    There are lots of free-camping opportunities throughout Northern Ontario (tons of Crown Land) and the Prairies (plenty of free campgrounds and sports fields). People in Saskatchewan are great and dont mind if you camp out in the open.

    I took mostly small quiet prairie roads and not the Trans-Canada. Get MapArt's Range and Township series maps - at 1:500 000 they are some of the best maps for biking through the Prairies especially if you want to get a sense of where you are from the crossroads along this vast expanse of "flat" land. (It's really not that flat)

    The highways of Northern Ontario are cycling hell. Going east to west, you'll have to go through them first. Going the other way, I was psyched to get home so I perservered through them. The north of Superior is beautiful though.

    *Generally* hills are longer but less steep coming from the east.

    I've also biked to the Maritimes from Ontario several times and there are lots of great routes. Biking through Quebec becoming quite pleasant with all the Route Verte initiatives.
     
  6. byfred

    byfred New Member

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    My wife and I have biked from Vancouver to London, Ontario a couple of times, and from London to Nova Scotia as well. We have never done the whole Trans Canada Section in any one year.
    From Vancouver, we have taken the Fraser Canyon at Hope BC and the "Yellowhead" from Kamloops to just west of Winnipeg. I preferred that route over the "Hope-Princton" route, which we have also taken, and hooks up to the Trans Canada Hwy. and Lake Louise. The later is likely more spectacular, but we found it much more difficult riding.
    Across the Prairies, both routes are equally beautiful, and the local people very friendly and accepting. However, don't expect "tailwinds" every day. It just doesn't work that way, and from our experience, I would say it is about 50/50. If, and when you get your tailwind, don't "waste" it, as it can turn around very quickly.
    We never have taken the route on the north shore of Lake Superior but have always headed for Duluth, Minn. and the south shore of the Lake to Sault Ste. Marie. Then south to Sarnia-Port Huron and home. However, I was talking to a lot of cycle/tourists this past summer, and I am lead to believe that the "North Shore Route" over Lake Superior is much safer than it used to be, and that it may even have a paved shoulder now. Check that out before you attempt that stretch, as the Truck Traffic in that area is brutal.
    Speaking of "Paved Shoulders", you can expect paved shoulders on all the major roads from Vancouver right through to Kenora, and if you go the Duluth/Sault route, right to London. It sure takes the stress of traffic out of a trip like that.
    On our trips to the Maritimes, we have always biked Hwy #3 to Niagara, and picked up the "Adventure Cycling Maps" (<www.adventurecycling.ca>) and came out at Bar Harbour, Maine. From there, you can take a ferry to Yarmouth NS and beyond.
    If you feel that I could be of any help in your planning, feel free to ask.
    A trip like that is not near as big a deal as you might be led to think, almost anybody can do it. You will be suprised at variations of bicycles and people you will meet out there.

    Good luck..........byfred
     
  7. hungrycyclist

    hungrycyclist New Member

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    Hi there

    I am also planing a trip from Trto to Vancouver in the Summer of 2005. I am currently busy putting togeather the plans but it is no mean feat as I plan to take the year out and follow down the West Coast of the States and in to South America.

    I must be mad.....

    To have more of an idea of what I'm doing have a look at my site below (very simple to date but more to come.

    If you give me you email I will do mybest to keep you informed of all the adviced I get and how I get on.

    Maybe see you on the road...

    All the best from sunny London
     
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