Torque Wrenches

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mseries, Feb 15, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    Maybe I should ask this in rec.bicycles.tech, they are keen on torque-ing there. Who uses a torque
    wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ? For years I haven't and had only few problems, my cranks
    came loose once ! but I know I should do things in accordance with the manuals especially on my best
    bike. Also I read on r.b.t that some one was getting a proper tool for the Shimano self extracting
    crankset bolt cap, has anyone seen these for sale in the UK ? How would one manage to tighten the
    cap to the correct torque (3-7 Nm) with what I imagine is simply a small pin spanner ? I reckon it
    wouldn't really matter for this as it takes no stress in normal usage.

    Opinions please.
     
    Tags:


  2. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    I had the same thought this morning so checked my local Halfords and they only have torque wrenchs
    for cars. There must be something similar for bikes otherwise the manufacturers wouldn't specify
    tensions, unless they do it for legal reasons. Maybe our bikes would last longer with the correct
    tensions, nothing over-tightened, and nothing too loose?

    Simon
     
  3. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 15:39:26 -0000, "MSeries"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Who uses a torque wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ? For years I haven't and had only few
    >problems, my cranks came loose once ! but I know I should do things in accordance with the manuals
    >especially on my best bike. Also I read on r.b.t that some one was getting a proper tool for the
    >Shimano self extracting crankset bolt cap, has anyone seen these for sale in the UK ? How would one
    >manage to tighten the cap to the correct torque (3-7 Nm) with what I imagine is simply a small pin
    >spanner ? I reckon it wouldn't really matter for this as it takes no stress in normal usage.

    Whether or not you use a torque wrench may well depend on how good a "feel" you have when tightening
    fasteners. If you are at all mechanically/practically minded then you should be able to manage
    perfectly well without one. The diameter of the thread and materials involved should be your guide.
    You'll need to go easier with aluminium than you would with steel for example.

    By instinct, most people probably over tighten the size of fastener you find on your bike, but the
    acceptable range in this kind of application is fairly forgiving.

    The specific example you asked about, of a cap tightened to between 3-7 NM, will feel very light to
    most people. It's barely more than a pinch with your wrist, you certainly wouldn't want to apply any
    effort with a spanner or ratchet.

    If you enjoy mech'ing your bike or want to know that you are being accurate then go ahead and buy a
    torque wrench, but whatever you do buy a *proper* one. Don't go near the toy ones you'll find in
    places like Argos, they are worse than useless and will likely be wildly inaccurate.

    Good quality torque tools needn't be expensive, probably the best value option in the UK would be a
    Norbar wrench. Excellent quality and very reliable. Something like the Norbar SL1 would be ideal for
    your bike work, range of 8 - 54NM and only about £45 from a good tool dealer.

    Using a torque wrench for a while will educate your wrist, as it were, so in the future you can be
    more confident when working without one.
    --

    "Bob"

    'The people have spoken, the bastards'

    Email address is spam trapped.
    To reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  4. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Simonb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:402f9651$[email protected]...
    > I had the same thought this morning so checked my local Halfords and they only have torque wrenchs
    > for cars. There must be something similar for
    bikes
    > otherwise the manufacturers wouldn't specify tensions, unless they do it
    for
    > legal reasons.

    Go to:

    http://www.cromwell.co.uk/static/publication/106/pages/1037.pdf

    http://www.cromwell.co.uk/browse?page=11

    Like what Bob said, SL1 £46.22 mail order, credit cards accepted. (No, I don't work for Cromwell,
    they are a local company but not just for local people).

    Regards, Pete
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 15:39:26 -0000, "MSeries"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Who uses a torque wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ?

    <url:http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tork-grip.html> of course!

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
     
  6. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 15:39:26 -0000, "MSeries"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Maybe I should ask this in rec.bicycles.tech, they are keen on torque-ing there. Who uses a torque
    >wrench for their bikes ?

    I do. I'm a bit of a torque obsessive (cars too)

    My bike torque wrench is a 3/8" drive Sealey. Pretty cheap for a torque wrench, I bought it because
    none of my car-sized torque wrenches went low enough to do bike bits. I use it for cranks mainly
    (which is admittedly rare).

    What sees more use on the bike is a torque screwdriver - 1/4" drive, but a screwdriver handle. Just
    like a torque wrench, but for the extra low torques. These are essential if you're an aluminium bolt
    lightweight fanatic, otherwise you'll shear things off on a regular basis. I find it's useful for
    torquing up badly designed brake cantis like the infamous Onza HO that lock solid if mis-torqued,
    and I mainly use it for putting the steel Allens back in the extra-soft alloy of my AMP girder fork.
    Stripping a thread in that thing is a nightmare to repair.

    --
    Smert' spamionam
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > Maybe I should ask this in rec.bicycles.tech, they are keen on torque-ing there. Who uses a torque
    > wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ?

    I only feel the need for one on cranks (square taper jobs). In fact I don't even own a TR, just
    borrow a car mechanics type*. These cranks are more difficult to judge by feel than other fastenings
    on a bike, partly because of the high torque, but mostly because you're not just simply doing up a
    bolt but wedging something on. It does feel a bit different. A lot of people (including pro
    mechanics) under-tighten cranks. Proper use of a torque wrench should prevent this, and also over-
    tightening of course.

    Having said that, I did strip the steerer clamp threads on the first ahead stem I used - didn't
    realise how little torque they required.

    * which I understand are not reliably accurate at low torque

    ~PB
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    MSeries posted ...

    > Maybe I should ask this in rec.bicycles.tech, they are keen on torque-ing there. Who uses a torque
    > wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ? For years I haven't and had only few problems, my
    > cranks came loose once ! but I know I should do things in accordance with the manuals especially
    > on my best bike. Also I read on r.b.t that some one was getting a proper tool for the Shimano self
    > extracting crankset bolt cap, has anyone seen these for sale in the UK ? How would one manage to
    > tighten the cap to the correct torque (3-7 Nm) with what I imagine is simply a small pin spanner ?
    > I reckon it wouldn't really matter for this as it takes no stress in normal usage.
    >
    > Opinions please.

    Having been a 'Torque Control Engineer' for Desoutter (they make power tools and GR Electronic
    Torque Control systems) for a while of my working life, and having worked on the Raleigh production
    line, well, the Dyna-Tech part anyway, among many others, it was notable that the torque specs given
    by most manufacturing companies are mainly for use in the factories using power tools and not
    necessarily for home users to stick to. The torque characteristics of a hand and power turned bolt
    are completely different and use different torque values.

    Most Torque specs are also, nowadays, a sop to the ligitious society in USA and provide an extra
    level of 'get-out' insurance for component failure.

    IMHO a small 'home' torque wrench, used intermittently and probably without practice and under less
    than ideal conditions, can do more harm than good. I never use a torque wrench nowadays, except when
    re-building the bottom end of an engine, or other 'safety critical' component, like brake disc bolts
    for instance. General bicycle maintenance is happily reliant upon 'feel' and the correct sizes of
    spanner. One good reason for the differing lengths of spanners for differing sizes of nuts is the
    amount of leverage (torque) that can be transmitted.

    --
    Paul
     
  9. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 18:24:06 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >In fact I don't even own a TR, just borrow a car mechanics type*.

    >* which I understand are not reliably accurate at low torque

    The accuracy on all torque wrenches drop away as you approach the edge of it's working range (either
    upper or lower).
    --

    "Bob"

    'The people have spoken, the bastards'

    Email address is spam trapped.
    To reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  10. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >IMHO a small 'home' torque wrench, used intermittently and probably without practice and under less
    >than ideal conditions, can do more harm than good.

    I think you are probably right - using Allen keys or spanners, which tend to be shorter the smaller
    they are, means it's easy to feel the point at which the fastener is tight. Tightening a 6mm bolt
    into aluminium with a monstrous great torque wrench you will never feel the thread go up and you
    won't feel it strip either.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
     
  11. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, MSeries
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Opinions please.

    I have a torque wrench and I even have and have read the instructions
    :-(

    I have always been of the belief that if it feels right it probably will be. I have sheared a few
    bolts during my working life - always when loosening ones which are rusted solid.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.millport.net
     
  12. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Simonb
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > There must be something similar for bikes otherwise the manufacturers wouldn't specify tensions,
    > unless they do it for legal reasons.

    A spanner of known length and a spring balance will work if you have enough time !

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village http://www.millport.net
     
  13. Vernon Levy

    Vernon Levy Guest

    > Opinions please.

    A torque wrench should be unneccessary if you have a decent set of spanners. Spanners are designed
    to administer an appropriate torque without inflicting pain on the user...stop and think about it,
    small diameter bolts with small heads use small short spanners gripped by a few fingers and the
    thumb, if you feel pain/discomfort when tightening a bolt then you are probably using too much force
    this applies equally to the use of allen keys. There are very few instances where a high torque is
    needed on a bike, the crank being one of them . Even then I reckon the lack of a torque wrench is a
    'survivable' situation.

    Adjustable spanners should be avoided on two counts...

    a poor fit for the nuts/bolt heads easy to administer too much force on smaller sized bolts

    I'd spend my money on something that gets more use.

    Vernon in Leeds
     
  14. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    MSeries wrote:
    > Maybe I should ask this in rec.bicycles.tech, they are keen on torque-ing there. Who uses a torque
    > wrench for their bikes ? What sort is it ? For years I haven't and had only few problems, my
    > cranks came loose once ! but I know I should do things in accordance with the manuals especially
    > on my best bike. Also I read on r.b.t that some one was getting a proper tool for the Shimano self
    > extracting crankset bolt cap, has anyone seen these for sale in the UK ? How would one manage to
    > tighten the cap to the correct torque (3-7 Nm) with what I imagine is simply a small pin spanner ?
    > I reckon it wouldn't really matter for this as it takes no stress in normal usage.
    >
    > Opinions please.

    Thanks to everyone who responded, pretty much what I expected to honest. Thanks.
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    John Hearns posted ...

    > On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 17:51:26 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> What sees more use on the bike is a torque screwdriver - 1/4" drive, but a screwdriver handle.
    >> Just like a torque wrench, but for the extra low torques.
    > Oooohhhh.... what an interesting thing. Reference please? Probably can't justify one to
    > myself though.

    http://www.torqueleader.com/screwdrivers.htm

    A tad expensive for home use though .. especially if you add on any sensing devices and other
    'stuff' .. Maybe a good club purchase with a loan-out facility .. ;)

    Others available from Cromwell Tools . http://www.cromwell.co.uk/

    Look for part numbers

    KEN-555-5010K KEN-555-5020K KEN-555-8050K KEN-555-8100K

    All at about £120 ish ...

    --
    Paul
     
  16. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 18:11:28 +0000, John Hearns <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Reference please? Probably can't justify one to myself though.

    RS part 547-379 http://rswww.com (it's an unbookmarkable and generally ugly site)

    NB - I paid a _lot_ less than that - more like a tenner on eBay
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...