tortilla help never made before

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Janet Bostwick, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. I'm going to make tortillas today for dinner. I've never made them before--is there anything I need
    to know before I start? I have a 12-inch cast iron skillet for baking them. What about the recipe? I
    thought I would go with this simple one: 2 cups unbleached flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons
    lard/shortening, 1/2 cup warm water. Thanks Janet
     
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  2. Marlene C.

    Marlene C. Guest

    Add dry ingredients, mix. Add water, SLOWLY....don't dump all of it in at once. Pour, mix, pour
    mix..till you get the consistency you want. Don't be afraid to add abit more water as needed.
    Important to get dough on the moist side.. moist but not sticky... as it dries out abit during the
    process. Too dry a dough makes for tough and brittle tortillas.

    Also, abit of 'sitting time', I've found, helps the dough have a more uniform and smooth texture.
    After you make the dough, let sit about 10 minutes or so in a bowl with a dampish cloth or paper
    towel covering.

    I can't really comment on the recipe, because I always 'eyeball' my ingredients, and never bother
    measuring them. I always mean to make note of it all, but never do.

    Yumm... homemade tortillas!! *drool*

    Marlene

    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm going to make tortillas today for dinner. I've never made them before--is there anything I
    > need to know before I start? I have a 12-inch cast iron skillet for baking them. What about the
    > recipe? I thought I would go with this simple one: 2 cups unbleached flour, 1 teaspoon salt,
    3
    > tablespoons lard/shortening, 1/2 cup warm water. Thanks Janet
     
  3. "Marlene C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Add dry ingredients, mix. Add water, SLOWLY....don't dump all of it in at once. Pour, mix, pour
    > mix..till you get the consistency you want. Don't
    be
    > afraid to add abit more water as needed. Important to get dough on the moist side.. moist but not
    > sticky... as it dries out abit during the process. Too dry a dough makes for tough and brittle
    > tortillas.
    >
    > Also, abit of 'sitting time', I've found, helps the dough have a more uniform and smooth texture.
    > After you make the dough, let sit about 10 minutes or so in a bowl with a dampish cloth or paper
    > towel covering.
    >
    > I can't really comment on the recipe, because I always 'eyeball' my ingredients, and never bother
    > measuring them. I always mean to make note of it all, but never do.
    >
    > Yumm... homemade tortillas!! *drool*
    >
    > Marlene
    Thanks for your help. Janet
     
  4. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 13:47:08 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm going to make tortillas today for dinner. I've never made them before--is there anything I need
    >to know before I start? I have a 12-inch cast iron skillet for baking them. What about the recipe?
    >I thought I would go with this simple one: 2 cups unbleached flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons
    >lard/shortening, 1/2 cup warm water. Thanks

    Let us know how it turns out. I was going to comment that "trying to make tortillas for the first
    time today" rather than making for tonight's dinner would be more practical. As Marlene says, the
    recipe includes some "eyeballing" and feel for the operation. Ex: depending on how you measure it, a
    "cup" of flour can contain something between 4 and 6-1/2 oz (weight). It's not rocket science, but
    it's not cup-of-soup, either. Good luck, and I hope they turned out perfect.
     
  5. "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 13:47:08 -0700, "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm going to make tortillas today for dinner. I've never made them before--is there anything I
    > >need to know before I start? I have a
    12-inch
    > >cast iron skillet for baking them. What about the recipe? I thought I would go with this simple
    > >one: 2 cups unbleached flour, 1 teaspoon
    salt, 3
    > >tablespoons lard/shortening, 1/2 cup warm water. Thanks
    >
    > Let us know how it turns out. I was going to comment that "trying to make tortillas for the first
    > time today" rather than making for tonight's dinner would be more practical. As Marlene says, the
    > recipe includes some "eyeballing" and feel for the operation. Ex: depending on how you measure it,
    > a "cup" of flour can contain something between 4 and 6-1/2 oz (weight). It's not rocket science,
    > but it's not cup-of-soup, either. Good luck, and I hope they turned out perfect.

    They turned out pretty good(not perfect shape)but everything else was good. I did take into account
    that cup measurements vary so I chose the middle of the road for measuring--spoon into the cup and
    level. For this particular recipe next time I will scoop the flour as it was obvious right away that
    more flour was needed(for my taste) in relation to the lard. But I fiddled with the proportions and
    then wrapped the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for a half hour. I rolled them out on Silpat
    so sticking wasn't a problem. I was undecided about which was best for production so ended up
    rolling them all out and sandwiching them between foil until baked and had a couple of stuck spots.
    All in all, they weren't that much different to handle than pizza dough, or pie crust or dog cookie
    dough and certainly not as nasty as a slack bread dough. Now that I've done it once I can see that
    it would be no problem to roll one and then while it bakes, roll out another. I had been worried
    (unnecessarily)that turning them when baking would be a problem I don't have a tortilla warmer, so
    what's the best way to keep them warm without either drying out or getting steamy? Thanks Janet
     
  6. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 14:45:22 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote

    >> Let us know how it turns out.
    >
    >They turned out pretty good(not perfect shape)but everything else was good.

    Terrific! I'm sure perfect shape is a very small consideration. I've never made a round-round dough
    thing of any description. :)

    > I don't have a tortilla warmer, so what's the best way to keep them warm without either drying out
    > or getting steamy?

    I usually just cover with a (cloth) towel. If they get cold, I nuke 'em (very briefly). For longer
    sitting, I'd put waxed paper in between the 'layers.'

    Congrats -- your first attempt certainly sounds better than mine. What did you serve these with?
     
  7. Marlene C.

    Marlene C. Guest

    Ahhh, yes.. the different state shaped tortillas. Most of mine when
    starting out,
    resembled Florida :) The key to the round shape. .(and I've in no way
    perfected it,
    but I can get a decent roundish shape :p ).. is to roll, pick up and give a
    1/4 turn, roll, pick up, give a 1/4 turn..etc etc.

    I don't roll all mine out in advance, but I do pinch off a small palmfull, make a sort of flattened
    disc shaped form out of it. I make all my little 'disc shapes' first, and then roll one at a time..
    .usually having one the skillet, the other ready to go.

    Keeping them stored has never been a problem for me, probs because we go through them pretty fast
    (in a house with 3 teenagers, it's expected). I'm trying to remember back to the authentic Mexican
    household I lived in (where I learned to make them), and honestly, I can't remember what she stored
    them in afterwards either !

    During the process, I usually keep mine in between foil. They never sit long enough to lose their
    fresh taste. :)

    M
    >
    > They turned out pretty good(not perfect shape)but everything else was
    good.
    > I did take into account that cup measurements vary so I chose the middle
    of
    > the road for measuring--spoon into the cup and level. For this particular recipe next time I will
    > scoop the flour as it was obvious right away that more flour was needed(for my taste) in relation
    > to the lard. But I
    fiddled
    > with the proportions and then wrapped the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for a half hour. I
    > rolled them out on Silpat so sticking wasn't a problem. I was undecided about which was best for
    > production so ended up rolling them all out and sandwiching them between foil until baked and had
    a
    > couple of stuck spots. All in all, they weren't that much different to handle than pizza dough, or
    > pie crust or dog cookie dough and certainly
    not
    > as nasty as a slack bread dough. Now that I've done it once I can see
    that
    > it would be no problem to roll one and then while it bakes, roll out another. I had been worried
    > (unnecessarily)that turning them when baking would be a problem I don't have a tortilla warmer, so
    > what's the best way to keep them warm without either drying out or getting steamy? Thanks Janet
     
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