Total newbie - minor pains and balance

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Cycler1337, May 15, 2021.

  1. Cycler1337

    Cycler1337 New Member

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    Hi all,

    I am basically a total newbie to cycling. I'm in my 30s, and I did ride a bike as a child and a handful of times as an adult, but basically haven't ridden a bike "for real" consistently in about 15 years. I had a hybrid but didn't really like it that much, so I recently purchased a road bike, which I enjoy riding due to it being lighter, and having 3 separate grips I can switch from, plus I like to get a "work out" in.

    Anyway, I started only 2 days ago, and I notice some soreness/tenderness in the base of my thumb area, and a bit up into the forearm. I would not call it an "injury", but after about 10 minutes of riding, it burns like lactic acid buildup, like when you are on your last rep at the gym with a heavy weight. It goes away if I take a 5-10 minute break then get back on. It also helps to rotate my grip. Also have minor soreness in sit bone area, even with a proper fit and padded pants. But it's not "bad." Is this fairly normal? The bike shop did "fit" me into the bike with the proper seat and handlebar level that they thought was best, and I did some test riding there. Nothing else feels bad.

    I imagine this is my body trying to adjust to cycling now (I got kinda addicted and did it for 1.5 hrs yesterday and an hour today already).

    Lastly, does anyone have any tips for improving my balance when turning? I can turn, but it feels clunky like I'm probably turning way wider than I need to be, in fear of falling off (I broke my wrsit from a skateboard as an adult, so I am a bit on the cautious side). Any good exercises so I can learn my limit better and learn how narrow I can actually turn?
     


  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Re:hands
    On my previous drop bar bike, I switched between three slightly different shifters and two different bars before setting on the most comfortable combination.
    If you do any group rides you’ll soon notice that the most common hand signal is the ”numb shake”.
    You are not alone.
    There are gel pads one can buy and have fitted underneath the bar wrap. Or simply double-wrap the bars.
    Also, keep in mind that the pressure on your hands will reduce as you get fitter. One reason for the forward lean is for your upper body to act as a counterweight for pedalling effort. The more consistent power you can deliver through your legs, the less pressure your hands will see.
    Regarding your butt:
    First, see above about pressure.
    Secondly, you have to give your body time to adapt.
    Imagine fracturing your leg, having your foot in a cast. Non-weight bearing. How do you think your foot would feel when you start walking?
    When you pick up cycling, your butt has it worse. Each of your sit bones has about the surface area of your thumb fingerprint. That’s smaller than your heel.
    Can’t really help with turning. Most riding is done at speed. If you need to unclip and wobble a little to make a u-turn on a single-lane road, that’s a very minor everyday problem.
     
  3. Michael Lalonde London

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    The pain subsides as your muscles get used to the labour :)
     
  4. Cycler1337

    Cycler1337 New Member

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    For anyone wondering, this all basically went away on its own after a couple of months of riding.
     
  5. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    The pressure points on a bike are your hands, feet and butt. Hands are helped but not eliminated by gloves, bar width and stem length. And to a minor amount by control position with brifters. EVERYONE has saddle problems and it is simply a point of finding a saddle that works for you. Usually it is narrow enough on the nose not to rub on your thighs and wide enough on the rear and shaped so that you are sitting on your 'sit bones' and not your crotch. Shoes have to be HAVE TO BE the correct size. Road bikes work best with clipless pedals and the one's I've found best are the Look Keo or the Shimano SpD SL. Don't try to get away with a Chinese cheapy. I've destroyed at least one crankset with a pedal stripping out in the middle of a ride.

    You will have a several months of pains as you get used to the power position and getting the proper sizes for you. Stick in there. We are all brother's of the wheel.
     
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