Touching The Void on CH 4



G

Gordon

Guest
Judith <[email protected]> wrote
>
>I'm not really enjoying it. When I saw his leg jolt and he started
>screaming, it suddenly got warm in here and I wanted to change
>channel.


I read the book first, and must admit that I broke out in a cold sweat
and had to put it down for a while . . .
:)
--
Gordon Harris
 
G

Gordon

Guest
Judith <[email protected]> wrote
>On Thu, 24 Nov 2005 23:24:28 +0000, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
>wrote:
>
>>>Good film.

>>
>>Yes, but it's a truly wonderful book: I felt that the film paled in
>>comparison. You really should read it.

>
>I can't read books. It takes too long. I find other things to do.
>There must be dozens of books I am four chapters into (including one
>*you* lent me and I've started reading two others now!)
>
>Judith

I read TTV in two or three long sessions, only putting it down to
recover from the emotional exhaustion!
Of course if you have seen the film first.... :-(
--
Gordon Harris
 
F

Fran

Guest
[email protected] said...
> Judith <[email protected]> wrote
> >
> >I'm not really enjoying it. When I saw his leg jolt and he started
> >screaming, it suddenly got warm in here and I wanted to change
> >channel.

>
> I read the book first, and must admit that I broke out in a cold sweat
> and had to put it down for a while . . .
> :)
>

I haven't seen it or read it, but I know enough of the story... I'm not
very brave when it comes to 'suspense' things, and I'm not sure I'd be
able to sit through the film even though I know it all works out in the
end.
--
To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
where common sense dictates.
 
P

Paul Saunders

Guest
Tony Buckley wrote:

>> Anyway, it was good for a laugh, it's finished now, Most of them
>> did really badly, but the dancer came out on top

>
> I didn't see it, but that result doesn't surprise me. However you
> measure it (general strength, localised strength, stamina, endurance,
> flexibility, speed etc) dancers have to be damn fit.


Yeah. Actually, although the series has finished, I just remembered that
they are showing slightly longer uncut versions at a later time and date, so
if you want to see it, there may be one or two episodes left.

It's on Channel 5 at 1:05am tonight (early tomorrow morning). Worth a look.

Paul
 
P

Peewiglet

Guest
On Fri, 25 Nov 2005 18:01:41 -0000, "Bob Watkinson"
<[email protected]> wrote:

[...]
>> And absolutely again. I'm quite sure I coulnd't have done it, in the
>> same way as I know there's no way I could have cut off my arm as Aaron
>> Ralston did. I don't have that sort of determination to cling to life.

>
>I wonder. If you could have asked both people before their experiences,
>whether they could have done it, would they have said they could or not?
>

Interesting question! If I ever get to a Jo Simpson lecture I'll ask
him :)


Wet fishes,
--
,,
(**)PeeWiglet~~
/ \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
 
Bob Watkinson wrote:

> The decision that always astonishes me is the one JS made to descend
> further into the crevasse. I don't think that would have occurred to me if I
> were in that position


I thought he made that pretty clear in the book. He couldn't go up or
sideways - down was his only option. Since he choice was 'certain
death' or 'almost certain death' (by going down) he chose 'almost
certain death'. It had the added 'advantage' that when he ran out of
rope he would die quickly rather than spending 3 or 4 terrifying nights
dying slowly.

I'm sure anyone there with the length of time he had to think would
make the same decision. (of course some of us might choose to give up
and die there).
 
Bob Watkinson wrote:

> The decision that always astonishes me is the one JS made to descend
> further into the crevasse. I don't think that would have occurred to me if I
> were in that position


I thought he made that pretty clear in the book. He couldn't go up or
sideways - down was his only option. Since he choice was 'certain
death' or 'almost certain death' (by going down) he chose 'almost
certain death'. It had the added 'advantage' that when he ran out of
rope he would die quickly rather than spending 3 or 4 terrifying nights
dying slowly.

I'm sure anyone there with the length of time he had to think would
make the same decision. (of course some of us might choose to give up
and die there).
 
Bob Watkinson wrote:

> The decision that always astonishes me is the one JS made to descend
> further into the crevasse. I don't think that would have occurred to me if I
> were in that position


I thought he made that pretty clear in the book. He couldn't go up or
sideways - down was his only option. Since he choice was 'certain
death' or 'almost certain death' (by going down) he chose 'almost
certain death'. It had the added 'advantage' that when he ran out of
rope he would die quickly rather than spending 3 or 4 terrifying nights
dying slowly.

I'm sure anyone there with the length of time he had to think would
make the same decision. (of course some of us might choose to give up
and die there).
 
Bob Watkinson wrote:

> The decision that always astonishes me is the one JS made to descend
> further into the crevasse. I don't think that would have occurred to me if I
> were in that position


I thought he made that pretty clear in the book. He couldn't go up or
sideways - down was his only option. Since he choice was 'certain
death' or 'almost certain death' (by going down) he chose 'almost
certain death'. It had the added 'advantage' that when he ran out of
rope he would die quickly rather than spending 3 or 4 terrifying nights
dying slowly.

I'm sure anyone there with the length of time he had to think would
make the same decision. (of course some of us might choose to give up
and die there).
 
R

Rudi Winter

Guest
Peewiglet <[email protected]> wrote:
> Excellent! You must be the only person in the whole country who hasn't
> seen it! (You weird person... ;-)


I haven't either (still haven't) but I found the book "unputdownable"!
--
Rudi Winter, Aberystwyth, Wales
 
R

Rudi Winter

Guest
Mike Clark <[email protected]> wrote:
> When Joe Simpson was on Desert Island discs, Sue Lawley continually
> questioned him on any religious influence on him at the time of the
> incident. He withstood the onslaught from her very well.


It didn't seem like an onslaught to me at all. The two of them worked
out that point rather very well. I thought that was an excellent
programme - it triggered my buying the book!
--
Rudi Winter, Aberystwyth, Wales
 
M

Mike Clark

Guest
In message <[email protected]>
Peewiglet <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Fri, 25 Nov 2005 18:01:41 -0000, "Bob Watkinson"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> [...]
> >> And absolutely again. I'm quite sure I coulnd't have done it, in the
> >> same way as I know there's no way I could have cut off my arm as Aaron
> >> Ralston did. I don't have that sort of determination to cling to life.

> >
> >I wonder. If you could have asked both people before their experiences,
> >whether they could have done it, would they have said they could or not?
> >

> Interesting question! If I ever get to a Jo Simpson lecture I'll ask
> him :)
>
>
> Wet fishes,


Joe Simpson seems to have spent his life taking chances and getting into
tricky situations, often involving injury (to himself and others) and
sometimes death (of close friends).

--
o/ \\ // |\ ,_ o Mike Clark
<\__,\\ // __o | \ / /\, "A mountain climbing, cycling, skiing,
"> || _`\<,_ |__\ \> | immunology lecturer, antibody engineer and
` || (_)/ (_) | \corn computer user"