Tour de France

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Gps, Jun 23, 2003.

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  1. Gps

    Gps Guest

    Hi Does anyone know of a source for detailed route and starting time information for this years TDF?
    I've searched the FAQs without much help and major websites don't have the level of detail we would
    like. Thanks
     
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  2. Mister Max

    Mister Max Guest

    "GPS" <[email protected]> posted:

    > Hi Does anyone know of a source for detailed route and starting time information for this years
    > TDF? I've searched the FAQs without much help and major websites don't have the level of detail we
    > would like. Thanks

    On the official site http://www.letour.com/2003/presentationfr/parcours_iti_00.html

    In French, but decipherable, with estimated times for the caravan and the peleton, depending on
    speed. You'll need a detailed map to understand the course - Michelin or IGN. - Max

    --
    MisterMax Slideshows of Angkor Wat, Bali, Crete, Maui, Malaysia, Morocco, Sicily (new), St Tropez,
    Thailand, Tour de France: http://buten.net/max/ (Yes,RemoveDoubles is part of my email address. The
    double letters in my last name are not.)
     
  3. Tom Weaver

    Tom Weaver Guest

    A couple weeks ago, I was in France and went through Joinville the starting town for the Team
    Time Trial. They have a website showing the starting times and probable pass through times for
    that stage.

    http://www.joinville-tourismoffice.com/index.php?page=tourdefrance&title=Tour%20de%20France

    I'm sure other towns will have similar information.

    By the way, while I was taking a picture to the town's countdown clock, a group of riders in Team
    Bianchi gear rode past. The picture can be seen at http://www.teamradpan.com/news.htm. We followed
    the team trial route for most of the distance. It starts with a one or two k uphill and then goes
    through rolling countryside. A very pretty route. I'd like to be there to see the teams go through.

    Tom "The Sag King" Weaver

    GPS wrote:
    > Hi Does anyone know of a source for detailed route and starting time information for this years
    > TDF? I've searched the FAQs without much help and major websites don't have the level of detail we
    > would like. Thanks
     
  4. "GPS" <[email protected]> wrote let it be known in news:[email protected]:

    > Hi Does anyone know of a source for detailed route and starting time information for this years
    > TDF? I've searched the FAQs without much help and major websites don't have the level of detail we
    > would like. Thanks
    >
    >

    Find yourself a copy of the VeloNews "Tour de France 2003 Official Guide"

    Team profiles, route maps, rider profiles... everything you could want to know.

    --
    Curt Bousquet [email protected] < Reverse for email

    Road biking in Southern VT and Western Mass.

    My 2002 bike log: http://www.scanline.com/bikelog/2002.html
     
  5. Ken Brown

    Ken Brown Guest

    If you click on the little US/UK flag you are taken to the English-language site, or go directly
    http://www.letour.com/2003/presentationus/index.html

    Ken

    Mister Max <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On the official site http://www.letour.com/2003/presentationfr/parcours_iti_00.html
    >
    >In French, but decipherable, with estimated times for the caravan and the peleton, depending on
    >speed. You'll need a detailed map to understand the course - Michelin or IGN. - Max

    Ken Brown, Toronto Canada Ontario Rail Trails: http://webhome.idirect.com/~brown delete "nospam" if
    replying via e-mail
     
  6. Amh

    Amh Guest

    "Tim B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]r.com>...
    > I've only been riding my road bike for about a month. I ride 20-25 miles daily, all on a rail
    > trail bike path. Only about 11.5 mph average but it gets the job done. There's a century ride 6
    > weeks from now near me, billed as a flat-to-rolling tour with lots of support and not a race. They
    > stop 5 times during the 100.
    >
    > It seems to me that if I can ride 25 in the morning and be ok to go to work afterwards without a
    > lot of noticeable pain, I should be able to have a goal of doing 20 five times in a row with
    > rest breaks in between and be fine. They have 10, 25, and 50 mile options, and I could bail from
    > the 100 to the 50 midway if I wanted to. I'm 44 without any health problems I can think of other
    > than being about 250 pounds and that's coming off nicely with the nice calorie expenditure from
    > cycling. And thinking about the century gives me a nice, seemly unattainable goal, and that
    > works for me. Within a couple of weeks I'll have appropriate shorts, shoes and shirts; the bike
    > was expensive enough (Specialized Sequoia Sport, love it) that I skimped on the extras for the
    > first month.
    >
    > Here's my questions.
    >
    > 1. Am I nuts for thinking I can do this? My first inclination is to get a physical and explain
    > what I'm up to, and presuming there's not a big problem there, go on.

    Yeah a little nuts.

    >
    > 2. If it seems ok, how can I train for this? My first inclination is to do a 50 every couple of
    > weeks on the rail trail, not early in the morning but later on in the day, 25 miles slightly
    > uphill along a river, 25 miles back slightly downhill, and if that is comfortably achievable,
    > go on and do the tour. Then in the days in between, work on getting up to about 14 mph, as it
    > looks like from the brochure that they figure about that, and work on rolling hills.

    If the route is well supported you shoudln't have too much trouble. Take a long break at the feed
    stations. Your training sounds like it will get you to the finish as long as you don't race. It will
    really help you to find a group you can train with or at least ride the century with.

    But one thing GET COMFORTABLE SHORTS NOW! It will be too late in a few weeks. You want to get what
    works for you. In order to do that it will require some experimenting. Or you may get lucky and find
    a pair of shorts you can wear for over 10 hours of riding.

    enjoy the ride, Andy
     
  7. Rg

    Rg Guest

    snip
    > >
    http://www.joinville-tourismoffice.com/index.php?page=tourdefrance&title=Tour%20de%20France
    > >
    > > I'm sure other towns will have similar information.
    > >
    > Thanks Tom!
    >
    > My gf and I will be following le tour for the first 9 stages. We don't know what we'll be staying
    > once we leave Paris so these links will come in handy.

    I suggest that unless you are planning to camp or sleep under the stars that you try and book your
    accommodation NOW - the whole area around the tour route/stages gets block booked (you may be too
    late .....) - you could try the chains like Campanile or Ibis or the Logis de France group.

    We are following the first week or so and booked hotels in January .... some were already full then.

    RG

    >> snip
     
  8. Tom Weaver

    Tom Weaver Guest

    amh wrote:
    > Tom Weaver <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>A couple weeks ago, I was in France and went through Joinville the starting town for the Team
    >>Time Trial. They have a website showing the starting times and probable pass through times for
    >>that stage.
    >>
    >>http://www.joinville-tourismoffice.com/index.php?page=tourdefrance&title=Tour%20de%20France
    >>
    >>I'm sure other towns will have similar information.
    >>
    >
    > Thanks Tom!
    >
    > My gf and I will be following le tour for the first 9 stages. We don't know what we'll be staying
    > once we leave Paris so these links will come in handy.
    >
    > I'll get to see the clock with Team Bianchi going past also!
    >
    > Andy

    While we were in France we stayed at the hotel formule1 several nights.
    http://www.hotelformule1.com/formule1/index.html They are low-cost (25 euros a night) and work well
    - as long as you don't mind going down the hall to get to the toilet and shower.

    We stayed in one in St. Dizier where two stages end. Give them a look.

    Tom
     
  9. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    > I suggest that unless you are planning to camp or sleep under the stars that you try and book your
    > accommodation NOW - the whole area around the tour route/stages gets block booked (you may be too
    > late .....)

    Even the campgrounds are hard to get into. I spent about 2 weeks in May, trying to find reservations
    in nearby campsites. I was successful, but it was difficult.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  10. Amh

    Amh Guest

    Tom Weaver <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > While we were in France we stayed at the hotel formule1 several nights.
    > http://www.hotelformule1.com/formule1/index.html They are low-cost (25 euros a night) and work
    > well - as long as you don't mind going down the hall to get to the toilet and shower.
    >
    > We stayed in one in St. Dizier where two stages end. Give them a look.
    >
    > Tom

    Found a hostle in Troyes we'll use as a base. One week and counting!

    Andy
     
  11. Tom Weaver

    Tom Weaver Guest

    amh wrote:
    > Tom Weaver <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >
    >>While we were in France we stayed at the hotel formule1 several nights.
    >>http://www.hotelformule1.com/formule1/index.html They are low-cost (25 euros a night) and work
    >>well - as long as you don't mind going down the hall to get to the toilet and shower.
    >>
    >>We stayed in one in St. Dizier where two stages end. Give them a look.
    >>
    >>Tom
    >
    >
    > Found a hostle in Troyes we'll use as a base. One week and counting!
    >
    > Andy

    We spent one night in Troyes at a very nice hotel. I hate to think what they will be charging while
    the Tour is in town. Let us know how you like Troyes. We walked around town and liked it - an old
    town with lots of half-timbered buildings.

    From Troyes we drove down to Ronchamp and visited Notre Dame du Haut there. It is a most amazing
    building. It was well worth the time spent there.

    Let us hear about your trip.

    Tom
     
  12. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Curt Bousquet wrote:
    > Find yourself a copy of the VeloNews "Tour de France 2003 Official Guide"
    >
    > Team profiles, route maps, rider profiles... everything you could want to know.

    My copy only profiles seven teams. The header page for that section says "The 22 Teams" or something
    like that. Did I get a bogus copy?

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  13. Amh

    Amh Guest

    Tom Weaver <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > We spent one night in Troyes at a very nice hotel. I hate to think what they will be charging
    > while the Tour is in town. Let us know how you like Troyes. We walked around town and liked it -
    > an old town with lots of half-timbered buildings.
    >

    Where is the best eating?

    > From Troyes we drove down to Ronchamp and visited Notre Dame du Haut there. It is a most amazing
    > building. It was well worth the time spent there.

    Thanks for the pointer. Neither one of us has been so it is all new to us.

    >
    > Let us hear about your trip.

    I'll post when I return.

    Andy

    >
    > Tom
     
  14. Raptor <[email protected]> wrote let it be known in news:[email protected]:

    > My copy only profiles seven teams. The header page for that section says "The 22 Teams" or
    > something like that. Did I get a bogus copy?

    Yup, I'd say you got a bogus copy... My copy, bought from the news stand, has 22 teams (page numbers
    131-152). Then there is one more advertising page before the back cover. If you got less than this,
    bring it back for a refund! :)

    (or maybe they printed different versions for other regions/countries?)

    --
    Curt Bousquet [email protected] < Reverse for email

    Road biking in Southern VT and Western Mass.

    My 2002 bike log: http://www.scanline.com/bikelog/2002.html
     
  15. Tom Weaver

    Tom Weaver Guest

    amh wrote:
    > Tom Weaver <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>We spent one night in Troyes at a very nice hotel. I hate to think what they will be charging
    >>while the Tour is in town. Let us know how you like Troyes. We walked around town and liked it -
    >>an old town with lots of half-timbered buildings.
    >>
    >
    >
    > Where is the best eating?
    >

    I can't remember where we ate dinner. What we tended to do for most lunches was go into one of the
    local stores and buy some bread, cheese, fruit and some of the local meatloaf-like offering. Ask the
    proprietor about them. These were always good and made an excellent meal or two.

    Don't forget that dinner is later than we are used to. It generally starts no earlier than
    7:30 or 8.

    When you get tired, just grab a seat at an outdoor cafe, order an espresso, sit and watch the world
    walk by for an hour or more. It's a great way to relax. We Americans can learn something from the
    French about this.

    Tom
     
  16. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    Tom Weaver wrote:

    >
    > When you get tired, just grab a seat at an outdoor cafe, order an espresso, sit and watch the
    > world walk by for an hour or more. It's a great way to relax. We Americans can learn something
    > from the French about this.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    You can sit for over an hour with one expresso? The expresso I had in Italy had as much volumn as
    a thimble.

    Kenny Lee
     
  17. Tom Weaver

    Tom Weaver Guest

    Kenny Lee wrote:
    > Tom Weaver wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> When you get tired, just grab a seat at an outdoor cafe, order an espresso, sit and watch the
    >> world walk by for an hour or more. It's a great way to relax. We Americans can learn something
    >> from the French about this.
    >>
    >> Tom
    >>
    > You can sit for over an hour with one expresso? The expresso I had in Italy had as much volumn as
    > a thimble.
    >
    > Kenny Lee
    >
    Ken,

    It's not about the espresso. There seems to be a much more relaxed attitude about life in
    general. The French seem to think nothing of ordering one espresso and sitting at the cafe for a
    couple hours.

    An excellent idea, IMHO.
     
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