Tour of Britain safety concerns....

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by cupra, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. cupra

    cupra Guest

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/3620600.stm

    "The first Tour of Britain for five years has begun with a series of complaints by riders over safety.
    Olympian Roger Hammond, who finished sixth, said: "The first few riders went into a diversion for the cars at 500m, I got balked and couldn't get back."
    About half the field were thought to have wanted to halt the race twice soon after the start, and as the race passed through holiday traffic in Blackpool.
    Italian Andrea Peron said: "Cars were asked to stop but wouldn't."
    Peron told The Guardian: "The first 10 guys would pass, then the cars would move with the peloton.
    "We told the race direction they had to do something, because it was way too dangerous. They have to come up with a solution.

    British professional Charly Wegelius added: "The situation seemed to be too much for the marshals.
    "My livelihood is at stake, but I'm a British pro and I want racing in Britain to be successful, something I can be proud of."
    Event director Tony Doyle commented: "We're aware that the riders' safety is paramount.
    "We've been assured that steps will be taken to solve the problems. The police are going to extend the support they give us.
    "For some police and marshals it's been some years since they last worked on an event of this scale."

    ----------------------------

    Madness - I'd expect this sort of problem in a charity ride, but not a professional race!!
     
    Tags:


  2. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce Guest

    mae <[email protected]> wedi ysgrifennu:

    > About half the field were thought to have wanted to halt the race
    > twice soon after the start, and as the race passed through holiday
    > traffic in Blackpool.
    > Italian Andrea Peron said: "Cars were asked to stop but wouldn't."
    > Peron told The Guardian: "The first 10 guys would pass, then the cars
    > would move with the peloton.


    Standard British level of respect for cyclists (and 'other people' in
    general, come to that). Very sad, but I don't think anyone here would be
    surprised.

    <snip>

    > Madness - I'd expect this sort of problem in a charity ride, but not
    > a professional race!!



    Well, they could install a solid wall of plod and marshalls to line the
    route, but otherwise an appropriate level of civilised behavior from those
    not involved is required for this kind of event to pass without the kind of
    incident reported. In an increasingly "F**k You!" society this seems less
    and less likely to happen.

    --
    Rob

    Please keep conversations in the newsgroup so that all may contribute
    and benefit.
     
  3. >The =
    >police are going to extend the support they give us.


    I should bl**dy well hope so!

    >"For some police and marshals it's been some years since they last =
    >worked on an event of this scale."


    Ridiculous excuse, isn't it. They can quite happily shut off roads for various
    running events without incident. Forgive me for being an old cynic, but it
    smacks of the typical disregard/contempt for cyclists all too prevalent in the
    UK. After all, cyclists are slow, aren't they...

    AAAAGGGHHH!!!

    They couldn't organise a p*ss-up in brewery...

    But I really shouldn't be surprised :-(

    Cheers, helen s





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  4. On 02 Sep 2004 12:17:36 GMT, dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> "For some police and marshals it's been some years since they last =
    >> worked on an event of this scale."

    >
    > Ridiculous excuse, isn't it. They can quite happily shut off roads for
    > various
    > running events without incident.


    For one or two big running events yes, but that is certainly the minority.
    It is getting harder and harder to stage road running events. There have
    been road races where runners have been hit by passing cars. Road races
    have been reorganised and some have been cancelled. The police cost money
    and closing roads, especially the distance required for a cycle race,
    isn't easy.

    I accept that something like the Tour of Britain needs some roads to be
    closed if it is to be safe and a success but you'd have to ask the
    organisers what steps they took towards this and whether the police and
    other authorities limited the road closures.

    Colin
     
  5. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]

    > They couldn't organise a p*ss-up in brewery...


    I was once responsible for running a large multinational project that had had
    some ups and downs in its early days. When the project finished, we booked the
    Black Sheep Brewery for a night and invited everyone who had been involved with
    the project. So there was no way that the above accusation could be levelled at
    us.
    --
    Mark South, Super Genius: World Citizen, Net Denizen, Brewery Pissup Organiser
     
  6. davek

    davek Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > I accept that something like the Tour of Britain needs some roads to be
    > closed if it is to be safe and a success but you'd have to ask the
    > organisers what steps they took towards this and whether the police and
    > other authorities limited the road closures.


    Surely for a race like this not all the roads need to be closed for the
    full duration of the race?

    I was living in Leeds for the few years when the Leeds Classic was part
    of the cycling calendar, and as I recall, the city centre was only
    closed off to road traffic a fairly short time before the riders
    arrived, thus minimizing inconvenience.

    And by the time the riders arrived in the city the roads they had
    covered early on in the stage were already open again.

    It's not like the London marathon when you have thousands of runners
    spread across the whole route over a period of several hours.

    d.
     
  7. On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 13:49:53 +0100, davek <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >> I accept that something like the Tour of Britain needs some roads to
    >> be closed if it is to be safe and a success but you'd have to ask the
    >> organisers what steps they took towards this and whether the police
    >> and other authorities limited the road closures.

    >
    > Surely for a race like this not all the roads need to be closed for the
    > full duration of the race?


    No, a rolling closure is possible and frequently used for races.

    > It's not like the London marathon when you have thousands of runners
    > spread across the whole route over a period of several hours.


    The spread would be important though. Some cycle races drop those who are
    behind by a specified time and a key stage in order that the rolling
    closure doesn't expand. This is something that would be agreed with the
    police.

    All road races (running and cycling) need police permission. This follows
    a risk assessment---this is the athletics one:

    http://www.ukathletics.net/vsite/vfile/page/fileurl/0,11040,4854-136550-137858-31082-0-file,00.pdf

    The BCF one will be similar. The decisions about closure and marshalling
    would be taken following consultation with the police

    Colin
     
  8. On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 13:49:53 +0100, davek wrote:
    > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >> I accept that something like the Tour of Britain needs some roads to be
    >> closed if it is to be safe and a success but you'd have to ask the
    >> organisers what steps they took towards this and whether the police and
    >> other authorities limited the road closures.

    >
    > Surely for a race like this not all the roads need to be closed for the
    > full duration of the race? [...]
    > It's not like the London marathon when you have thousands of runners
    > spread across the whole route over a period of several hours.


    The problem was that the escape had a 18 minute lead on the peloton. See
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/road/2004/sep04/tourbritain04/?id=results/tourbritain041
     
  9. On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 14:58:03 +0200, Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 13:49:53 +0100, davek wrote:


    >> Surely for a race like this not all the roads need to be closed for the
    >> full duration of the race? [...]
    >> It's not like the London marathon when you have thousands of runners
    >> spread across the whole route over a period of several hours.

    >
    > The problem was that the escape had a 18 minute lead on the peloton.


    That would certainly be a problem for a rolling closure---imagine all the
    junctions in an 18 minute (6 miles?) stretch of road.

    Colin
     
  10. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 14:46:39 +0200, "Mark South"
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >"dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >message news:[email protected]
    >
    >> They couldn't organise a p*ss-up in brewery...

    >
    >I was once responsible for running a large multinational project that had had
    >some ups and downs in its early days. When the project finished, we booked the
    >Black Sheep Brewery for a night and invited everyone who had been involved with
    >the project. So there was no way that the above accusation could be levelled at
    >us.


    I once worked for an organisation (which shall remain nameless). For
    the Christmas lunch do, several hundred folk turned up the brewery
    just opposite Finsbury Square, in London, only to be told it was
    closed...


    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  11. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Let's hope frock-wearing defrocked Cornelius Horan doesn't make an
    appearance.

    ~PB
     
  12. cupra

    cupra Guest

    At some point:[email protected],
    Pete Biggs <pblackcherry{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> typed:
    > Let's hope frock-wearing defrocked Cornelius Horan doesn't make an
    > appearance.
    >
    > ~PB


    Nah - not enough TV coverage for him to cause chaos!
     
  13. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 11:48:58 +0100, "Robert Bruce"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    >Standard British level of respect for cyclists (and 'other people' in
    >general, come to that). Very sad, but I don't think anyone here would be
    >surprised.
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Madness - I'd expect this sort of problem in a charity ride, but not
    >> a professional race!!

    >
    >
    >Well, they could install a solid wall of plod and marshalls to line the
    >route, but otherwise an appropriate level of civilised behavior from those
    >not involved is required for this kind of event to pass without the kind of
    >incident reported. In an increasingly "F**k You!" society this seems less
    >and less likely to happen.


    So very very true, and it seems to me, ever on the increase.
    ...............

    The gentle game of soccer is so much more appealing to Joe Public, as
    you can sit on your sofa with your triple portion of Fish & Chips and
    24 pack Carling and take part ..............

    ps
    I love fish & chips and Carling (once in a while) but going off
    violent football matches .....
     
  14. cupra wrote:
    > Madness - I'd expect this sort of problem in a charity ride, but not
    > a professional race!!


    Bearing in mind the amount (or lack of) publicity this event has had, to the
    average car owner, it IS a charity ride, because no-ones told them any
    different. So you're certainly going to get people who won't stop.

    ....I'm off to Nottingham tomorrow. Thankfully the ride is in the opposite
    direction....


    Regards,

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Connolly
    http://www.acutecomputing.co.uk
    Derby
    UK
     
  15. davek

    davek Guest

    Peter Connolly wrote:
    > Bearing in mind the amount (or lack of) publicity this event has had, to the
    > average car owner, it IS a charity ride, because no-ones told them any
    > different. So you're certainly going to get people who won't stop.


    I blame the BBC. They've got several channels filled up with shit
    programmes about people having boot sales and decorating their front
    room that could easily be put to one side while the cycling's on. They
    don't seem to appreciate that having the TV rights also means having the
    responsibility to give the race adequate coverage so that new sponsors
    will be attracted for future editions.

    And following the British cycling successes in the Olympics, you'd think
    there would be enough of an audience - I bet audiences would at least
    equal what they got for the African Cup of Nations football that got
    such extensive coverage a few months ago.

    It's a fucking disgrace.

    d.
     
  16. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    > It's a fucking disgrace.

    hear, hear. Who do we direct complaints to at the BBC?

    Tony B
     
  17. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 16:08:40 +0100, "Peter Connolly"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > cupra wrote:
    >> Madness - I'd expect this sort of problem in a charity ride, but not
    >> a professional race!!



    TOUR of Britain ??? 5 days .....500 miles ....354 in the
    Midlands.....
     
  18. cupra wrote:

    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/3620600.stm
    >
    > "The first Tour of Britain for five years has begun with a series of complaints by riders over safety.
    > Olympian Roger Hammond, who finished sixth, said: "The first few riders went into a diversion for the cars at 500m, I got balked and couldn't get back."
    > About half the field were thought to have wanted to halt the race twice soon after the start, and as the race passed through holiday traffic in Blackpool.
    > Italian Andrea Peron said: "Cars were asked to stop but wouldn't."
    > Peron told The Guardian: "The first 10 guys would pass, then the cars would move with the peloton.
    > "We told the race direction they had to do something, because it was way too dangerous. They have to come up with a solution.
    >
    > British professional Charly Wegelius added: "The situation seemed to be too much for the marshals.
    > "My livelihood is at stake, but I'm a British pro and I want racing in Britain to be successful, something I can be proud of."
    > Event director Tony Doyle commented: "We're aware that the riders' safety is paramount.
    > "We've been assured that steps will be taken to solve the problems. The police are going to extend the support they give us.
    > "For some police and marshals it's been some years since they last worked on an event of this scale."


    This happened in a previous Kellogg's Tour when some old dodger in a
    brown Cortina ignored a police roadblock and drove straight through the
    peloton, forcing riders into the ditch. Adri Van der Poel was injured
    (and fuming, quite rightly).

    There isn't the culture in the UK to actually close roads properly.
     
  19. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I was on top of Holme Moss today. After the leading group a lady (surprising
    driving a 4x4) forced her way up the hill and tried to park on a load of
    people sitting and watching the race. Absolutely crackers!

    Anyways, apart from that the atmosphere on Holme Moss and at the finish in
    Sheffield was brilliant. I hope in continues and with a lot more coverage on
    TV (and a lot less mentalists) next year and beyond.

    Paul F


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  20. Temp3st

    Temp3st Guest

    ah - I'm so mad I missed it all due to work commitments.
    Managed to hit the road around 4pm and saw loads of cyclists coming back
    towards wakefield.

    bum apples!!!
     
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