Touring/commute shoes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul Richardson, Nov 18, 2004.

  1. Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine

    You can respond here, or [email protected]
     
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  2. do not spam

    do not spam Guest

    In article <BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>,
    Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine


    I like Shimano touring shoes (model T-092). They have a flat sole that
    is comfortable for walking, but are lighter weight and less bulky than
    most MTB shoes.
     
  3. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>,
    Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine
    >


    _ It really depends on how much you're willing to compromise
    on walking vs biking. The low end shimano mountain bike shoes,
    are very comfortable to walk in, but may not be stiff enough
    to make you happy on the bike. The Shimano M038 and M020
    are good commute shoes if they fit IMHO.

    http://www.rei.com/product/47684024.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CYCLING_TOC

    The M020 is on a lot of close-out lists at the moment, I got
    a very cheap pair at Mike's Bikes. Here's an online deal

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=15827&SRCCODE=2047

    _ You also need shimano shaped feet. These are kind of narrow
    shoes. Lake makes some very similar shoes that might have a
    wider last. Given the amount of stairs that BART and bicycles
    generally require I would go for walking comfort and tred over
    stiffness. I think any shoe that meets your requirements will
    likely be an SPD only shoe.

    _ Booker C. Bense






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  4. dgow

    dgow New Member

    Joined:
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    I also commute daily via bike/BART/bike. I used to wear Shimano M034 (or a earlier version very like it). It was fine, however the soft rubber sole wore to the point that the cleats were in contact and created pretty good skid plate on occassion. I now use Diadora Gekos for all rides, both road and MTB. The only downside- the sole cleats can actually catch on some of the non-skid stuff BART has put on some stairways- I guess nothing is perefect. Before Diadora sourced in China their shoes were wider than most. I have wide feet and the solution for me with any brand is that I have to go a size or size and a half larger. This gets the width (and a bonus room to store valuables in the toe box) and most SPD shoes have enough fore and aft adjustment for the cleats to take allow proper positioning.
     
  5. Neil Brooks

    Neil Brooks Guest

    Paul Richardson wrote:

    > Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes
    > for bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like
    > bike that I will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is
    > navigating stairs, slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats
    > (Look compatible) , I'd still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine


    A few years back, I bought a pair of (that year's version of) these:

    http://snipurl.com/aqnh

    No, they're not /optimally/ stiff, but they're comfortable, durable, pedal
    efficiently, and they're cheap, cheap, CHEAP!! Twenty bucks? Come on....

    I hosed 'em down with Scotchgard to "waterproof" em. I wear 'em for casual
    mtb riding and any rides on my touring bike where walking is likely.

    Good luck!
     
  6. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 19:31:23 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (do not spam)
    wrote:

    >In article <BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>,
    >Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >>bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >>will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >>slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >>still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine

    >
    >I like Shimano touring shoes (model T-092). They have a flat sole that
    >is comfortable for walking, but are lighter weight and less bulky than
    >most MTB shoes.


    I'll second these, and they are in stock in a few shops in SF. They
    are stiff compared to some of the other shoes recommended here. If you
    want road shoe stiffness (well, close), the TO-92s are good. They are
    also relatively low key for bike shoes so you won't look like a clown
    on his way to the circus.
     
  7. Andy M-S

    Andy M-S Guest

    Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>...
    > Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    > bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    > will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    > slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    > still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine
    >
    > You can respond here, or [email protected]



    Specialized makes some nice, inexpensive MTB shoes that aren't too
    outrageous and are quite nice and comfortable. I picked up my last
    pair on sale for about $12 from their website, IIRC.
     
  8. Booker C. Bense wrote:
    >
    > _ You also need shimano shaped feet.


    :) Ah yes, Shimano's usual philosophy!

    Fortunately, I hear Nashbar's running a special on those feet.
    Unfortunately, they're all "lefts".


    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com.
    Substitute cc dot ysu dot
    edu]
     
  9. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 19:20:16 GMT, Paul Richardson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine
    >
    >You can respond here, or [email protected]


    The Shimano T092 is my choice and it uses recessed cleats and has a
    flat bottom. I looked for a link on the Shimano website and couldn't
    find the shoe. Maybe it's no longer sold.
     
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    In article <[email protected]>,
    Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 19:20:16 GMT, Paul Richardson
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >>bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >>will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >>slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >>still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine
    >>
    >>You can respond here, or [email protected]

    >
    >The Shimano T092 is my choice and it uses recessed cleats and has a
    >flat bottom. I looked for a link on the Shimano website and couldn't
    >find the shoe. Maybe it's no longer sold.


    http://bike.shimano.com/Footwear_Pedals/footwear/componenttemplate.asp?partnumber=SH-T092

    _ Froogle has some listings for them. They wouldn't be my choice
    for navigating all the stairs on BART on a regular basis, but
    if the BART stations you use generally have working elevators
    you can avoid the stair hassle and use a more bike shoe-like shoe.

    _ Booker C. Bense

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  11. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Paul Kopit wrote:

    > On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 19:20:16 GMT, Paul Richardson
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes
    >> for bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like
    >> bike that I will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is
    >> navigating stairs, slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats
    >> (Look compatible) , I'd still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine
    >>
    >> You can respond here, or [email protected]

    >
    > The Shimano T092 is my choice and it uses recessed cleats and has a
    > flat bottom. I looked for a link on the Shimano website and couldn't
    > find the shoe. Maybe it's no longer sold.


    They do seem to be gone. However, I saw some nice Shimano shoes in a bike shop
    the other day. They were similar to the TO92, but MTB shoes with lugged soles.
    The lugged soles were rubber though, which should make them good walkers. As
    you know, the problem with shoes like my Sidis is that the soles are plastic,
    and way too slippery. This is stupid -- I can't understand why the makers don't
    address this problem with these otherwise excellent shoes. They have a jillion
    models which differ only slightly and cosmetically anyway. Surely they could
    offer one with a rubber sole that's safe to walk in.

    For a true dual-purpose bike shoe, look at the police issue boots sold by
    Diadora and Sidi. There are usually tons of them for sale on eBay, for $40 or
    so.

    Matt O.
     
  12. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Guest

    On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 11:06:16 -0500, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Booker C. Bense wrote:
    >>
    >> _ You also need shimano shaped feet.

    >
    >:) Ah yes, Shimano's usual philosophy!
    >
    >Fortunately, I hear Nashbar's running a special on those feet.
    >Unfortunately, they're all "lefts".


    I dunno. Usually when I see such things on sale they're all size 37.

    Ron
     
  13. Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>...
    > Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    > bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    > will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    > slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    > still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine



    Since you are not racing, or even time trialing, use something like
    MKS touring pedals with clips and straps. I use a thick soled deck
    shoe myself. The sole is soft enough to bite into the pedal and avoid
    slippage, but even then, you ain't racing and who cares if you arrive
    at your destination about 30 seconds later. I'll never understand why
    so many commuters (or tourists) deck out in full racing kit.

    D.M.
     
  14. soloist

    soloist New Member

    Joined:
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    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=1041&brand=&sku=10037&storetype=&estoreid=

    I bought the Lake BMX-60 from Nashbar about four years ago. It has a ridged rubber sole with a cut-out for SPD cleats. They're good for walking and have held up well through work week commuting. They're heavy, but it's because it's a sturdily built shoe that it's lasted so long.

    Nashbar has what looks like a related model, the MX-60, on sale for $35. It has a lugged sole that looks like it should work well on any walking surface. It also looks like there's more fabric than leather on the upper compared the BMX-60, which will probably wear out sooner. But it will probably weigh considerably less. It looks like a very good value.
     
  15. Super Slinky

    Super Slinky Guest

  16. g.daniels

    g.daniels Guest

    Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.tech
    Date: 2004-06-24 14:19:38 PST


    BIG FEET PEDALS(and noslip)
    i have an answer for the big foot problem.
    and the answer is comprehensive-it clears the sinuses and deviates
    from accepted practice.

    plywood! cut four u shapes 1' wider two inches longer than the bear
    traps
    marked two sides for inside bolts and clamped together then drilled.
    painted red to not look stupid, the pedal covers are large.
    bolted and drilled one more hole just outside the traps outboard edge.

    outasight.

    the course is ten miles upwind then repeat down. The upwind is 15 to
    20 percent faster with less effort. the downwind is about the same:
    whatta drag.

    the kicker. my hip hurts from a slight dislocation. the trip, a
    necessary commute was thought to cripple but noooooooooo! the hip
    feels better!!
    the hip is better! wider stance: i'm 6'4" over into the 99 percentile
    for ergonomis if the pedal people work ergonomics into the product's
    width relationship to the cyclist's physiogamy.

    and my feet are aahhhh! happy feet.

    the plan was to fashion metal extenders for the traps.the ply
    temporary. but the ply absorbs and cushions.
    this is sooo goood! i recommend playing with the installation just to
    experiment and get a feel for always hillclimbing with exquisite
    comfort. itsa production job 'cept for the paint: only takes an hour.

    idea 1.5: touring chain cleaning. when the lube evaps in the heat on
    day two, a wipe and relube gets added slip from running the overnmite
    dried lube slightly crosschained then or in the morning. the rollers
    and plates are canted and the dirt gets thrown out. left and right.
     
  17. RBS

    RBS New Member

    Joined:
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    i like the cannondale arago mountain shoe. looks just like a sneaker and terrific for walking in. could wear all day if you had to. sometimes my son calls me while i;m out riding to meet him at the park to play ball and it's no problem with these shoes. two hole cleat only - spd or eggbeater.
     
  18. Bruce Frech

    Bruce Frech Guest

    "D. A.'Dutch' Martinich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Since you are not racing, or even time trialing, use something like
    > MKS touring pedals with clips and straps. I use a thick soled deck
    > shoe myself. The sole is soft enough to bite into the pedal and avoid
    > slippage, but even then, you ain't racing and who cares if you arrive
    > at your destination about 30 seconds later. I'll never understand why
    > so many commuters (or tourists) deck out in full racing kit.
    >
    > D.M.


    My commute is 15 miles/ 24 km, and I use full "racing" kit - including
    shoes. Why - for the same reasons racers wear them - close fit clothing is
    more comfortable and faster, the shoes work better. When I tour I use
    touring shoes = mtb shoes so I don't have to carry other walking shoes, but
    I still wear the full racing kit. Again for the reasons that they are more
    comfortable and faster (= more aero, less friction, easy to keep clean, easy
    to adjust for temps hot or cold, ....)

    When my commute is years past was 1 to 3 miles I would wear my office
    clothes. At some distance you have to consider the benefits of an outfit
    designed for riding.

    Bruce
     
  19. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

    In article <[email protected]>,
    D. A.'Dutch' Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Paul Richardson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<BDC235EF.12BAB%[email protected]>...
    >> Anyone have a recommendation on a good pair of touring/commute shoes for
    >> bicycling. I have a recently acquired sngle speed (track-like bike that I
    >> will be using to travel to/from BART (SF). My concern is navigating stairs,
    >> slick tiles etc..., with my regular road cleats (Look compatible) , I'd
    >> still like to clip in (SPD or Look is fine

    >
    >
    >Since you are not racing, or even time trialing, use something like
    >MKS touring pedals with clips and straps. I use a thick soled deck
    >shoe myself. The sole is soft enough to bite into the pedal and avoid
    >slippage, but even then, you ain't racing and who cares if you arrive
    >at your destination about 30 seconds later. I'll never understand why
    >so many commuters (or tourists) deck out in full racing kit.
    >


    _ IMHO, SPD is appropriate for commuting since once you've
    mastered clipless it is MASSIVELY easier to unclip than it is to
    deal with straps and clips. Also, if you have never tortured
    yourself with clips and straps you won't have the instincts to
    use them safely. The only advantage they have is that you can
    use them with any shoe. They have a lot of disadvantages from
    a commuting perspective. Perhaps the biggest of these is being
    able to bunny hop without pulling your feet off the pedals.
    For riding in traffic and dealing with road hazards, I think
    clipless pedals are well worth the hassle of special shoes.

    _ Booker C. Bense

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  20. Booker C. Bense wrote:

    > _ IMHO, SPD is appropriate for commuting since once you've mastered
    > clipless it is MASSIVELY easier to unclip than it is to deal with straps
    > and clips. Also, if you have never tortured yourself with clips and
    > straps you won't have the instincts to use them safely. The only
    > advantage they have is that you can use them with any shoe. They have a
    > lot of disadvantages from a commuting perspective. Perhaps the biggest of
    > these is being able to bunny hop without pulling your feet off the
    > pedals. For riding in traffic and dealing with road hazards, I think
    > clipless pedals are well worth the hassle of special shoes.


    This is probably not true for everyone, but I found another disadvantage to
    clips and straps were that they started to make the tops of my feet sore
    after really long (over 200 km) rides. Perhaps I didn't have them at a
    good tightness, or perhaps it's something I would have got used to, but I
    switched to clipless shortly after my first such ride and would never go
    back.

    I agree that they're much easier to get in and out of. I didn't feel
    comfortable practicing track stands on my fixed gear bicycle until I
    installed clipless pedals instead of the clips and straps it originally
    had.

    --
    Benjamin Lewis

    I regret to say that we of the FBI are powerless to act in cases of
    oral-genital intimacy, unless it has in some way obstructed interstate
    commerce. -- J. Edgar Hoover
     
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