Touring/commuting wheel hub/rims?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jeff Kwapil, Feb 1, 2003.

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  1. Jeff Kwapil

    Jeff Kwapil Guest

    Looking for hub & rim suggestions.

    Touring/commuting wheels.

    Sealed bearings, 36 hole rear and Campy 8-speed compatibility.

    Friction shifting is OK, Ergo is much better.
     
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  2. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    "Jeff Kwapil" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Kr0%[email protected]...
    > Looking for hub & rim suggestions.
    >
    > Touring/commuting wheels.
    >
    > Sealed bearings, 36 hole rear and Campy 8-speed compatibility.
    >
    > Friction shifting is OK, Ergo is much better.

    Check out the Bontrager Fairlane and Fairlane OSB at Rivendell (sp?). If you want more width and
    double eyelets, check Mavic T520. I have tried them both. I like the OSB feature of the
    Bontrager Fairlane.

    Peter will probably pipe in on the Campy stuff. If you are really serious about hubs check out
    Phil Wood.

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  3. Jeff-<< Looking for hub & rim suggestions.

    Touring/commuting wheels.

    Sealed bearings, 36 hole rear and Campy 8-speed compatibility.

    Phil Wood...

    Mavic T-520, CXP-33, Velocity Deep V..

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Jeff Kwapil

    Jeff Kwapil Guest

    Peter, a question for a Campy proponent. As I read about touring bikes, it seems nobody recommends
    Campy for touring & commuting. Not bad-mouthed, but it's just not mentioned. Any reason it wouldn't
    be suitable?

    I can't imagine it's durability. I used to commute 4000 or 5000 miles a year on the Maillard hubs
    that Trek put on my $300 bike in 1988. Modern Campagnolo would have to be many notches up.

    Also, I don't believe it's price. My bike already has a Campy drivetrain, so a wheel with 36h
    Centaur, Chorus or even Record would be very economical compared to a Phil cassette version.

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Jeff-<< Looking for hub & rim suggestions.
    >
    > Touring/commuting wheels.
    >
    > Sealed bearings, 36 hole rear and Campy 8-speed compatibility.
    >
    > Phil Wood...
    >
    > Mavic T-520, CXP-33, Velocity Deep V..
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Tim McTeague

    Tim McTeague Guest

    > Peter, a question for a Campy proponent. As I read about touring bikes, it seems nobody recommends
    > Campy for touring & commuting. Not bad-mouthed,
    but
    > it's just not mentioned. Any reason it wouldn't be suitable?

    That's because, as a touring cyclist, you could be far afield, when you have a mechanical. Most bike
    shops will have chains, cassettes, wheels, shifters and what-not that will fit in with a Shimano
    setup. Chances of finding spare Campy gear outside big cities...not good. Also, Shimano "owns" the
    mt. bike field. A lot of tourists use mt.bike kit on their bikes as it gives them a wide price range
    of drivetrains that work well for loaded touring. Campy is certainly great stuff, and they have
    more affordable gear now, but Shimano is the best choice in this arena IMO.

    Tim
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Campy 'long cage' triple derailleurs were not considered for 32 or 34 rear cogs with 52T chainrings.
    They would not pull back far enough in the small/small combination that the derailleur pulley would
    not tick the cog. They barely could handle the small/small combination without the chain draging on
    the bottom of the rear derailleur. You could get them to work. I used a 2000 Veloce long cage on my
    tandem with
    52/42/30 and 13/32.

    That's changed now that Campy offers the 3x10 long cage. It is about the same size as an XT rear
    derailleur and handles big cogs fine.

    You'll have a much better selection of wheels if you accept respaced Shimano 8 cassettes on a
    Shimano 8/9 hub. You can take the spacer money and just get a 9sp shift disk and shift out of the
    box Shimano 9 cassettes. I'd forget the cartridge bearing hubs and go with ball bearings.

    On Sun, 02 Feb 2003 20:39:25 GMT, "Jeff Kwapil" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Peter, a question for a Campy proponent. As I read about touring bikes, it seems nobody recommends
    >Campy for touring & commuting. Not bad-mouthed, but it's just not mentioned. Any reason it wouldn't
    >be suitable?
     
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