touring pedals?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by G.Daniels, May 5, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still attached
    to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade from the
    original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?
     
    Tags:


  2. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    > with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still attached
    > to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade from the
    > original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?

    I run Ritchey Logic Road pedals. They're single sided, SPD-style, and light. I typically use a
    mountain bike shoe, which allows me to walk while off the bike. For these, and other SPD-style
    pedals, make sure you get a good quality (i.e., stiff-soled) shoe...otherwise, you might experience
    "hot foot".

    Once you've gone to clipless, you won't go back. They're not as hard to get used to as you'd think,
    and are actually safer (IMHO) than rat-trap pedals.

    GG
     
  3. On 5 May 2003 12:57:26 -0700, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    >what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    >with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still attached
    >to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade from the
    >original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?

    Shimano makes a pedal that is SPD on one side and flat on the other. I think they are now called
    324's. I like them very much for both commuting and touring.

    Bob
     
  4. Mark Wolfe

    Mark Wolfe Guest

    I just bought a set of the new Shimano touring shoes (waiting on redphone order) and the chromoly
    spindle Performance forte pro spd road pedals (260grams, 40 bucks). I'm riding the pedals with
    mountain bike shoes right now, but the other shoes should be in any day now. They do have a good
    deal on the T091 touring shoe if you're size 40 or smaller. :(

    GaryG wrote:

    > "g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    >> with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still
    >> attached to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade
    >> from the original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?
    >
    > I run Ritchey Logic Road pedals. They're single sided, SPD-style, and light. I typically use a
    > mountain bike shoe, which allows me to walk while off the bike. For these, and other SPD-style
    > pedals, make sure you get a good quality (i.e., stiff-soled) shoe...otherwise, you might
    > experience "hot foot".
    >
    > Once you've gone to clipless, you won't go back. They're not as hard to get used to as you'd
    > think, and are actually safer (IMHO) than rat-trap pedals.
    >
    > GG

    --
    Mark Wolfe http://www.wolfenet.org gpg fingerprint = 42B6 EFEB 5414 AA18 01B7 64AC EF46 F7E6 82F6
    8C71 "They that give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither
    liberty nor safety"-B.Franklin
     
  5. Eric

    Eric Guest

    I tried these, but quickly gave up. When cliped in, it was very hard to corner without scraping the
    underside of the pedal. When using street shoes, I had to get used to flipping the pedal over before
    starting out, since the street shoe side weighs more. Very hard to use and anoying. I replaced with
    a standard SPD pedal and have no problems. If I really nee a need for street shoes, I'll get some of
    those SPD compatables made for walking.

    I would recomend MTB shoes, for walking purposes.

    Robert Quindazzi <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 5 May 2003 12:57:26 -0700, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:
    >
    > >what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    > >with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still
    > >attached to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade
    > >from the original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?
    >
    > Shimano makes a pedal that is SPD on one side and flat on the other. I think they are now called
    > 324's. I like them very much for both commuting and touring.
    >
    > Bob
     
  6. Iain Lang

    Iain Lang Guest

    .

    >I tried these, but quickly gave up. When cliped in, it was very hard to corner without scraping the
    >underside of the pedal. When using street shoes, I had to get used to flipping the pedal over
    >before starting out, since the street shoe side weighs more. Very hard to use and anoying. I
    >replaced with a standard SPD pedal and have no problems. If I really nee a need for street shoes,
    >I'll get some of those SPD compatables made for walking.
    >
    >I would recomend MTB shoes, for walking purposes.
    My LBS advised e to try stiff soles to counter the soreness I get through trainers (yes! - Guilty!
    I'm a fair-weather cyclist!). He then demonstrated the impressive stiffness in some of these
    sixty-quid-and-more shoes. All very well and good, but I could see little flex in the instep area,
    so - before I lash the cash - how easy are these things to walk in? Any recommendations? Yooors,

    Iain.
     
  7. datakoll-<< what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure
    about pedals with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown
    still attached to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an <<
    upgrade from the original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one

    Want to walk around-Time ATAC with some good MTB shoes, not car about walking around? Good fitting
    road shoes and Speedplay Zeros...

    Just converted from Campagnolo to SP, to move my feet out, trying to ease my back...and I really
    like them.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  8. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 5 May 2003 12:57:26 -0700, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    >what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    >with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still attached
    >to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade from the
    >original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?

    While I ride most of my road bikes with Look pedals and Sidi shoes (have varying models of both),
    on my touring bike I have a pair of Wellgo SPD pedals matched with el cheapo Performance Primo
    MTB shoes.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  9. Paul J Pharr

    Paul J Pharr Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" wrote in message
    > Just converted from Campagnolo to SP, to move my feet out, trying to ease
    my
    > back...and I really like them.

    I converted to SP a few weeks back. One knee began to hurt on the outside (ACL?), so my fitter
    measured the angle of my foot/ankle and installed some shims under the cleats. Haven't had a knee
    pain since, and my lower back feels much better...

    Paul J Pharr
     
  10. On Mon, 05 May 2003 12:57:26 +0000, g.daniels wrote:

    > what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    > with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still attached
    > to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade from the
    > original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?

    Do you ski? Think of these pedal systems like the bindings on skis. They do release in a fall, so
    your mental image is not relevant. They make a huge difference in riding.

    I personally use and recommend Speedplay Frogs. Walkable, totally free float over 20-some-odd
    degrees, and only one moving part. Very reliable, very secure, very comfortable.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  11. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 05 May 2003 12:57:26 +0000, g.daniels wrote:
    >
    > > what pedals do the experienced suggest for the ageing 50 mile sprinter whose unsure about pedals
    > > with clips being naturally clumsy( i can see myself arrowed into a canal upsidedown still
    > > attached to the frame) but likes nice machine work and thoughtful design but desires an upgrade
    > > from the original japanese/taiwanese 'rattraps'if there is one?
    >
    > Do you ski? Think of these pedal systems like the bindings on skis. They do release in a fall, so
    > your mental image is not relevant. They make a huge difference in riding.
    >
    > I personally use and recommend Speedplay Frogs. Walkable, totally free float over 20-some-odd
    > degrees, and only one moving part. Very reliable, very secure, very comfortable.
    >

    The lack of moving parts is no indication of longevity or easy care. These pedals require frequent
    service. Also not very good for touring unless you want to carry 2 extra items with you: 1) a dry
    lube for the cleat/pedal interface and 2) a grease injector. One ride in the rain and you better
    lube them.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  12. On Wed, 07 May 2003 14:50:00 +0000, Robin Hubert wrote:

    >> I personally use and recommend Speedplay Frogs. Walkable, totally free float over 20-some-odd
    >> degrees, and only one moving part. Very reliable, very secure, very comfortable.
    >>
    >
    > The lack of moving parts is no indication of longevity or easy care. These pedals require frequent
    > service. Also not very good for touring unless you want to carry 2 extra items with you: 1) a dry
    > lube for the cleat/pedal interface and 2) a grease injector. One ride in the rain and you better
    > lube them.

    Nonsense. I lube my pedals no more than once every 3-4 months. I also never bother with a lube on
    the cleat-pedal interface. After I shoot a bit of grease into the pedals, I grab a greasy rag to
    wipe off the excess, and some of that gets on the pedals where the cleat rides. That is it.

    Of course, I've only been uing them for 4 years/20,000 miles, so what do I know.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  13. Eric

    Eric Guest

    I'll have to look for them. Sounds like just what I need on my (soon to be built) commuter.

    Eric

    [email protected] (Chris Zacho "The Wheelman") wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Eric wrote:
    >
    > "I tried these, but quickly gave up. When cliped in, it was very hard to corner without scraping
    > the underside of the pedal. When using street shoes, I had to get used to flipping the pedal over
    > before starting out, since the street shoe side weighs more. Very hard to use and anoying. I
    > replaced with a standard SPD pedal and have no problems. If I really nee a need for street shoes,
    > I'll get some of those SPD compatables made for walking. "
    >
    > I've seen these as well, and actually considered them for my MTB. (I sometimes have trouble
    > locating the pedal clips when making quick starts). Then I saw a better model, also Shimano (I
    > forget the model number). It's basically a _two_ sided SPD pedal mounted inside a "regular"
    > MTB cage.
    >
    > The large platform is an easy target to hit, even in difficult situations, and my foot doesn't
    > slide off like it would on their smaller straight SPD pedals. And the SPD part is angled so simply
    > sliding the foot forwards engages the cleat.
    >
    > Since the SPD is on both sides, your unequal weight problem is solved, and the outer cage mekes it
    > possible to use with street shoes.
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  14. Eric

    Eric Guest

    If you're asking about the SPD street shoes, I haven't used them, so I have no idea. The MTB shoes I
    have look just like road shoes with pads around the cleat and on the heel. I can't feel any
    difference, but I'm not the best judge of those sorts of things. I think the big difference is the
    weight of the shoe, cleat style and the pads that allow walking across hardwood floors without
    scratching.

    E

    Iain Lang <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > .
    >
    > >I tried these, but quickly gave up. When cliped in, it was very hard to corner without scraping
    > >the underside of the pedal. When using street shoes, I had to get used to flipping the pedal over
    > >before starting out, since the street shoe side weighs more. Very hard to use and anoying. I
    > >replaced with a standard SPD pedal and have no problems. If I really nee a need for street shoes,
    > >I'll get some of those SPD compatables made for walking.
    > >
    > >I would recomend MTB shoes, for walking purposes.
    > My LBS advised e to try stiff soles to counter the soreness I get through trainers (yes! - Guilty!
    > I'm a fair-weather cyclist!). He then demonstrated the impressive stiffness in some of these
    > sixty-quid-and-more shoes. All very well and good, but I could see little flex in the instep area,
    > so - before I lash the cash - how easy are these things to walk in? Any recommendations? Yooors,
    >
    > Iain.
     
  15. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 07 May 2003 14:50:00 +0000, Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > >> I personally use and recommend Speedplay Frogs. Walkable, totally free float over 20-some-odd
    > >> degrees, and only one moving part. Very
    reliable,
    > >> very secure, very comfortable.
    > >>
    > >
    > > The lack of moving parts is no indication of longevity or easy care.
    These
    > > pedals require frequent service. Also not very good for touring unless
    you
    > > want to carry 2 extra items with you: 1) a dry lube for the cleat/pedal interface and 2) a
    > > grease injector. One ride in the rain and you better lube them.
    >
    > Nonsense. I lube my pedals no more than once every 3-4 months. I also never bother with a lube on
    > the cleat-pedal interface. After I shoot a bit of grease into the pedals, I grab a greasy rag to
    > wipe off the excess, and some of that gets on the pedals where the cleat rides. That is it.
    >
    > Of course, I've only been uing them for 4 years/20,000 miles, so what do I know.
    >
    > --
    >

    Gee, I dunno what you dunno, but I sell these all the time (for 4 years now) and service them also.
    I see many of these pedals come through the shop and have used them also for probably 20K or more.
    So, what do I know? What I know is I see alot of service problems due to people that, regardless of
    warnings and suggestions, insist on neglecting pedal service.

    After a ride in the rain, you better lube these pedals, or the next time you try, you'll find rust
    coming out the inside "seal". That rusty grease ought to lube your cleat/pedal interface just right.

    The funny thing is, most don't even notice the pedal body wobbling on the spindle, or that it spins
    so freely due to lack of lube, or that their cleats are worn out and ruining the pedal in the
    process. Then I ask about their service schedule and if they've read Speedplay's instructions on
    care and service ... almost always "uh ....".

    Anyway, I never said they were bad pedals (and I never said you were an idiot for using them), so
    don't be offended.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  16. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    I was thinking-that if I went to a long distance social gathering like say the sprint across
    florida, what would the pedal breakdown be? How many on what pedal with what shoe riding what bike
    type. In gross percentages, for example 75% of all old in shape farts riding road touring bikes with
    relaxed suspensions and carrying 30 pounds use what pedal equipment? MTB riders use?? Toe straps??
    Clips??? Johnson sez the tourer can slipout before endoing into the canal-is he putting us on here?
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...