Touring rims

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by David, Jun 19, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. David

    David Guest

    I am building a touring bike with 700 wheels and have several choices to make: Standard rims, like
    the Mavic T520 Off center rims, such as the Ritchey or IRD.

    My questions: Do OCRs make the wheel significantly stronger (laced into a 9 sp hub) than a
    centered rim?

    Has anyone on this ng used IRD rims?

    One of the rims (Ritchey) doesn't have eyelets, while the other one (IRD) does. Should this be a
    reason to choose the IRD rim over the Ritchey?

    I will appreciate any, or at least most, responses.

    --
    David
     
    Tags:


  2. Garry Broad

    Garry Broad Guest

    On Thu, 19 Jun 2003 16:00:18 -0700, David <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am building a touring bike with 700 wheels and have several choices to make: Standard rims, like
    >the Mavic T520 Off center rims, such as the Ritchey or IRD.
    >
    >My questions: Do OCRs make the wheel significantly stronger (laced into a 9 sp hub) than a
    >centered rim?
    >
    >Has anyone on this ng used IRD rims?
    >
    >One of the rims (Ritchey) doesn't have eyelets, while the other one (IRD) does. Should this be a
    >reason to choose the IRD rim over the Ritchey?
    >
    >I will appreciate any, or at least most, responses.

    From experience, I can't help you, since I've never tried a OCR, but that day is not far away.

    I've just built a rear road wheel with a 9sp block on a 130 OLN and the difference in spoke tension
    between the drive and non-drive side is really considerable. So much so, that I can't help but
    question the strength of this wheel.

    What I would like to know is, if OCR do make stronger wheels, why are they not standard rims for
    rear wheels?

    Is it that simple, or am I missing something obvious here?

    Garry
     
  3. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 08:19:43 +0100, Garry Broad <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What I would like to know is, if OCR do make stronger wheels, why are they not standard rims for
    >rear wheels?

    Because they're expensive and they're not the same as for the front, so at a stroke you double the
    inventory necessary of rims. And then, of course, there's an issue of whether or not it's actually
    a really big problem. Possibly even a problem that could be better served by slightly more
    eccentric spoke designs than by an OCR. Personally, I'd try halfradial first, just because I wanna
    see what happens.

    Jasper
     
  4. David-<< I am building a touring bike with 700 wheels and have several choices to make: Standard
    rims, like the Mavic T520 Off center rims, such as the Ritchey or IRD. >><BR><BR>

    Problem with the OCR rims are that they are really light. The 'offcentered-ness' doesn't make up for
    lack of weight, on a touring bike, IMO.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Garry-<< I've just built a rear road wheel with a 9sp block on a 130 OLN and the difference in spoke
    tension between the drive and non-drive side is really considerable. So much so, that I can't help
    but question the strength of this wheel.

    What I would like to know is, if OCR do make stronger wheels, why are they not standard rims for
    rear wheels? >><BR><BR>

    More expensive to make is the reason. Even more to make them with eyelets.

    If the 130mm wheel you built is tensioned properly, then it should be fine and dandy. Guys like me
    and others have been building 130mm casette wheels for over a decade w/o problems.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 08:19:43 +0100, Garry Broad wrote:

    > What I would like to know is, if OCR do make stronger wheels, why are they not standard rims for
    > rear wheels?

    Because for most purposes standard rims are strong enough.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a _`\(,_ | conclusion. --
    George Bernard Shaw (_)/ (_) |
     
  7. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    "David" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB178E92.BB16%[email protected]...
    > I am building a touring bike with 700 wheels and have several choices to make: Standard rims, like
    > the Mavic T520 Off center rims, such as the Ritchey or IRD.
    >
    > My questions: Do OCRs make the wheel significantly stronger (laced into a
    9
    > sp hub) than a centered rim?
    >
    > Has anyone on this ng used IRD rims?
    >
    > One of the rims (Ritchey) doesn't have eyelets, while the other one (IRD) does. Should this be a
    > reason to choose the IRD rim over the Ritchey?
    >
    > I will appreciate any, or at least most, responses.
    >
    > --
    > David

    Check out the 700C Trekking rims at URLs: http://www.ritcheylogic.com/trcataloghome.htm
    http://www.ritcheylogic.com/trpdfcharts/rims.pdf Pro Trekking have eyelets but only 32 holes. Also
    see the Bontrager Fairlane OSB at URL: http://www.bontrager.com/rims/detail.asp?id=109&pt=6
    Rivendell carries them in 36 hole version. See URL: http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/wheels/18094.html

    I have built T520 and T519s. They are very strong rims and can handle a large load. I have also
    built the Bontrager Fairlane OSB. They are not as well finished as Mavic rims, but they build up
    very true. I think the Bontrager Fairlane OSB will be as durable as the Mavic T520 if not more so.
    The Bontrager Fairlane OSB is less expensive than the Mavic T520. The Bontrager Fairlane OSB is
    specified at 560 grams. The Mavic T520 is specified at 565 grams. David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  8. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    gee, good stuff. noone mentioned the Sun CR-18(27") or the brother 700-both double wall. I ran mine
    into an antique storm drain grate(one of three extant) hotdogging thru town after but a weeks
    running straight and tru. took a real blow, down and in to the fini at grate's end. trued it
    yesterday and beyond the point where i'm a grade c wheel builder that is the wheeels are round but i
    haven't got the... the sun came true from the 3/16th's by six inch dent put in at 10 mph with 160
    pound rider and 25 pounds rear rack gear on 14/36 spokes. that is after a visit to the Hozan first.
    no what the devil is an OCR?
     
  9. Matt Temple

    Matt Temple Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    > gee, good stuff. noone mentioned the Sun CR-18(27") or the brother 700-both double wall. I ran
    > mine into an antique storm drain grate(one of three extant) hotdogging thru town after but a weeks
    > running straight and tru. took a real blow, down and in to the fini at grate's end. trued it
    > yesterday and beyond the point where i'm a grade c wheel builder that is the wheeels are round but
    > i haven't got the... the sun came true from the 3/16th's by six inch dent put in at 10 mph with
    > 160 pound rider and 25 pounds rear rack gear on 14/36 spokes. that is after a visit to the Hozan
    > first. no what the devil is an OCR?

    And just recently, a wheelset with CR-18 rims could be bought for about $70, with skewers!

    Matt Temple
     
  10. what about using different gauge spokes on the drive and non drive sidesto help equalize tension?
    This could be done pretty easily with any rim. Just buy different spokes for left and right. I'm
    feeling a little dimwited though so I can't figure out which side the thin spokes should go.....
     
  11. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "remove the polite word to reply" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > what about using different gauge spokes on the drive and non drive sidesto help equalize tension?
    > This could be done pretty easily with any rim. Just buy different spokes for left and right. I'm
    > feeling a little dimwited though so I can't figure out which side the thin spokes should go.....

    The difference in tension determines the amount of dish, which centers the rim. Thinner spokes can
    be used on the left because the tension is lower. Thinner spokes are more elastic, which causes less
    change in tension as the rim deflects under load.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...